News Releases

09/29/2016
Grant helps bring award-winning author to Mariner High School
Matt de la Pena photo
Last Stop on Market Street book cover photo

On the basketball court and in life, Matt de la Peña knows something about taking the shot.

As a teenager, de la Peña says he dreamed of finger rolls in pickup games at San Diego’s Balboa Park. His persistence in pursuing that dream paid off, taking him 500 miles north and a world away to the University of the Pacific on a full-ride basketball scholarship.

A 6-foot-1 guard, de la Peña made an impact on the court, but what he found in the college classroom made an impact on his life. That’s where he was introduced to books like “The Color Purple,” “Their Eyes Were Watching God” and Junot Díaz’s “Drown.”

“When I finally fell for literature, I fell hard,” de la Peña said.

The self-described “half-Mexican hoop-head” earned a master’s degree in creative writing at San Diego State University and went from reading books to writing them.

In six young adult novels, de la Peña writes about what he knows in “Ball Don’t Lie,” “Mexican WhiteBoy,” “We Were Here,” “I Will Save You,” “The Living” and “The Hunted.” And this year, de la Peña received the Newbery Medal for his 2015 picture book, “Last Stop on Market Street.”

De la Peña’s stories, both in his books and his life, struck a chord with Mariner High School librarian Stephanie Wilson. Wilson was looking for a way to connect students with good role models and decided to try to get de la Peña to the school.

“There was an article he wrote on NPR a few years ago called ‘Sometimes the Tough Teen is Quietly Writing Stories,’” Wilson said. “I sent it to the English department and our principal. The principal said, ‘Get him here.’”

On Tuesday, Oct. 4, Wilson’s own persistence will pay off when the author arrives for a full day of events with students and faculty. However, getting to this point wasn’t easy.

“I started applying for grants and got $1,500 from the Friends of the Mill Creek Library,” Wilson said.

Sue Ramsey, secretary of the Friends group, said the request was a bit unusual. “We have a professional development grant fund,” Ramsey said, adding that normally those requests are for teacher training opportunities. “This was for a whole school. We just thought this one was special.”

Still, more was needed. Some came from school-supporter funds and some came from Wilson's own library budget. In the middle of all that, she went on leave for a year.

“And then, he wins the Newbery,” Wilson said. “I’m not sure our students and maybe some of our staff understand the magnitude of him coming.”

Wilson is going to wring everything she can out of the visit.

“We will have two assemblies on that day, two book signings at lunch and he will work with staff after school in a seminar and Q&A format,” Wilson said. While those events aren't open to the public, de la Peña will be at University Book Store in Mill Creek from 7-8 p.m., Oct. 4, where he is scheduled for a free and open reading and book signing.

For his part, de la Peña says he still can’t quite believe what has happened in his life.

“Growing up, I never could’ve imagined anything like this,” de la Peña said in his comments accepting the Newbery Medal earlier this year. “Me and books? Reading? Nah, man, I was a working-class kid.

“Over the past 10 years, I’ve visited hundreds of schools and met tens of thousands of young people. And so many of them are just like that old version of me. Self-defined nonreaders who spend all day reading the world. My mission as an author is to help a few of them translate those skills to the written word.

“But what if I can nudge a few of these kids toward the magic of books at a younger age? What if I can write a story that offers that tough, hoodied kid in the back of the auditorium a secret place to feel?”

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

09/27/2016
State's poet laureate coming to Edmonds LIbrary

Washington State Poet Laureate Tod Marshall 

Write on Tod

Tod Marshall is the author of three books of poetry, most recently Bugle, which won the Washington State Book Award in 2015.  His work has been published in many journals, including Narrative, The Southern Review, The American Poetry Review, The Iowa Review, Shenandoah, The Colorado Review, Poetry Northwest, Volt, The Canary, The Kenyon Review and elsewhere.

Tod Marshall, Washington’s Poet Laureate, is coming to the Edmonds Library.

Marshall will read from his work and answer questions from 5-5:45 p.m., Friday, Sept. 30, at the library, 650 Main St., Edmonds. The Edmonds Bookshop will be at the library with copies of Marshall's books available for sale.

Marshall is in town to participate as a presenter at the sold-out 2016 Write on the Sound writer’s conference presented by the City of Edmonds Arts Commission that runs through Sunday, Oct. 2. His presentation at the library on Friday is funded by the Friends of the Edmonds Library.

Marshall will also available to sign books at the conference Book Signing Reception from 5:15-6:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 1, in the Edmonds Plaza Room, directly above the library. The reception is free and open to the public.

An English professor at Gonzaga University, Marshall’s two-year appointment as the state’s poet laureate began this year in February. The role includes building awareness and appreciation of poetry through public readings, workshops, lectures and presentations across the state.

And Marshall is taking the statewide part of that mission to heart. He is presenting at the conference on Saturday morning, zipping north to Bellingham for a Poetry Camp, then heading back south for sessions in Edmonds later Saturday and Sunday.

“The previous three laureates have all traveled a great deal and so I think that (a lot of travel) is an expectation,” Marshall said. “Outreach in the arts - in the humanities generally - is something that I’m passionate about, and so although the long hours on the road can get exhausting, I’m always enthused by the encounters with people.”

To get to those encounters and help the miles go by, Marshall said he is getting plenty of podcasts, talk radio, sporting events and ’70s/’80s rock.

“I am continually reminded of how important the arts, the humanities, are to people,” said Marshall, who is attending his first Write on the Sound conference. “Poetry doesn’t just thrive at universities or in schools; from my many encounters with very young students and with old enthusiasts, I know that there is a powerful appetite for art, for philosophy, for history, for poetry - it’s great to encounter that.”

Marshall said the poet-laureate duties are an extension of outreach he’s been doing since his undergraduate days at Siena Heights University in Michigan. “I’ve always felt that education is both continual and for everyone,” he said.

Whatever the setting, Marshall said he tries to take the same respectful approach.

“Whether folks are enrolling in a class or taking time out of their evenings to hear me talk, that gesture is a profound one; I want to make whatever happens worth their time, their attention,” he said.

During his talks in Edmonds, Marshall said he’ll be talking about blurring of lines between different modes of writing.  “Poetry, fiction and non-fiction all share so many qualities; I’ll try to help writers see how they can work on all those modes of writing,” he said.

And modes of presentation. Marshall said he believes poetry needs to be both read and heard.

“I think that it needs both forms to thrive.  They are two different flowers - think radiant, exuberant sunflower and tiny, quiet orchid,” he said. “You know what, though?  Both of them have the opportunity to achieve a similar sort of beauty - sometimes in the hush after a spoken line, there is a hushed echo of how ‘page’ poems function; sometimes in the raucous music of a Hopkins or June Jordan, there is a brash energy that unfolds in the mind. 

“We need all of our poetries.”

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

09/27/2016
Sno-Isle Libraries buys land for new Lake Stevens Library
Sno-Isle and Lake Stevens city officials photo
Sno-Isle Libraries and City of Lake Stevens officials gather at the site earmarked for a new, larger Lake Stevens Library and new city facilities. From left are: Sonia Gustafson, Lake Stevens Library Managing Librarian; Kendra Trachta, Sno-Isle Libraries Deputy Director; Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees President Sue Cohn; Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory; Lake Stevens Mayor John Spencer; Lake Stevens City Council member Sam Low, Lake Stevens City Council member Kim Daughtry and Lake Stevens City Administrator Mary Swenson.  Photo gallery

Sno-Isle Libraries is buying land for a new library to serve the Lake Stevens community.

A purchase and sale agreement for property on the northwest corner of 99th Avenue NE and Market Place in Lake Stevens was unanimously approved by the library district’s Board of Trustees at the Sept. 26 regular meeting.

“I’m thankful for the leadership and vision of our trustees,” Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. “Their commitment to the Lake Stevens community brings us one step closer to the new, larger library the community deserves."

The land is adjacent to property purchased earlier this year by the City of Lake Stevens. The library district and city are working together to site the new library as well as new city facilities. The purchase price of the library district’s parcel is $850,000, plus closing costs.

The Sno-Isle Libraries 2016-25 Capital Facilities Plan calls for replacing the Lake Stevens Library with a new, larger building. Community input strongly indicates the current library is too small to serve the growing Lake Stevens community.  Building and opening a larger library, however, would require voter approval for funding.

Sno-Isle Libraries will work with the City and County to place two ballot measures before voters for consideration. The first measure would ask whether a Library Capital Facility Area (LCFA) should be formed to raise necessary tax funds to construct and furnish a new Lake Stevens Library. A Lake Stevens library capital facility area would mirror the boundaries of the Lake Stevens School District.

This potential measure requires a simple majority approval to pass. A second potential ballot measure would ask voters whether library bonds should be issued for a new, larger Lake Stevens Library. For passage of this measure, 40 percent of those who voted in the previous general election must vote on this bond-issue question. In addition, passage of the bond measure requires approval by 60 percent or more of those voting.

Both library measures need to be approved for work to proceed on a new Lake Stevens Library. The first possible date for the measures to be on a ballot is Feb. 14, 2017.

Normally, the full price of the land would be included in the setting the bond amount, but not in this case. The trustees pledged half of the land cost, $425,000 plus closing costs, from library district reserves toward the purchase as part of the motion approved on Monday night.

“Sno-Isle Libraries’ commitment to pay half of the land purchase demonstrates our support for this project,” Board of Trustees President Sue Cohn said.

The site and building in which the current library operates are owned by the city. The City of Lake Stevens has long envisioned other uses for the property and is currently moving through a planning process for the downtown area. City officials have said the library and at least some city services must move from the downtown area.

“The current Lake Stevens Library serves the community as well as it can, but it is just too small to meet the needs of this growing area,” Woolf-Ivory said. “Community members told us they want a new, larger library and we’re working to help make their vision a reality.”

Board Vice-President Marti Anamosa added her support, saying, “This is a great partnership between the City of Lake Stevens and Sno-Isle Libraries.”

Beginning next week, the four-member committee called for in an interlocal agreement approved in August will start work on a joint site development plan. The committee includes two representatives from the city and two from the library district.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
09/26/2016
'Screenagers' film looks at screen-time issues and impacts
Screenagers movie poster Delaney Ruston photo
 
  Delaney Ruston

Screen time.

Delaney Ruston is well-versed on the level of chaos that can erupt when a parent utters those two simple words to a child staring at a computer, smartphone or game console.

The filmmaker and physician examines the impacts of screen time on children, teenagers and their families in her 2016 documentary, “Screenagers: Growing Up in the Digital Age.” The film will is scheduled for showing at both the Monroe and Coupeville libraries:

  • Monroe Library, 6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 5, and again at 11 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 8
  • Coupeville Library, 6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 5, and again at 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 8

Ruston uses her own experience to probe the corners of family life and explore struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. A former University of Washington faculty member, Ruston saw her own children turning toward a screen-based world and learned that the average U.S. young person spends 6.5 hours a day looking at screens. Ruston decided to look into the possible impacts of all this time and about the friction occurring in homes and schools around negotiating screen time.

One review says “Screenagers” is sure to prompt conversations about family communication and responsible use of technology, especially if parents and children watch the documentary together.

Ruston’s previous documentaries include “Hidden Pictures: A Personal Story into Global Mental Health” that explores personal mental health stories in five countries, and “Unlisted: A Story of Schizophrenia” depicting her journey to reconnect with her father after hiding from him for 10 years.

Ruston has been a family physician in California and Washington. She completed a Fulbright Fellowship producing short films on mental health in India. She has been a keynote speaker on mental health topics at the World Health Organization and the United Nations.

Ruston is currently the filmmaker-in-residence at Stony Brook Medicine, NY.

About Sno-Isle Libraries
Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Phil Spirito, Monroe Library Managing Librarian, 360-7647851, pspirito@sno-isle.org
  • Leslie Franzen, Coupeville Library Branch Manager, 360-678-4911, lfranzen@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
09/26/2016
'Screenagers' film looks at screen-time issues and impacts
Screenagers movie poster Delaney Ruston photo
 
  Delaney Ruston

Screen time.

Delaney Ruston is well-versed on the level of chaos that can erupt when a parent utters those two simple words to a child staring at a computer, smartphone or game console.

The filmmaker and physician examines the impacts of screen time on children, teenagers and their families in her 2016 documentary, “Screenagers: Growing Up in the Digital Age.” The film will show at the Coupeville Library at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 5, and again at 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 8

Ruston uses her own experience to probe the corners of family life and explore struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. A former University of Washington faculty member, Ruston saw her own children turning toward a screen-based world and learned that the average U.S. young person spends 6.5 hours a day looking at screens. Ruston decided to look into the possible impacts of all this time and about the friction occurring in homes and schools around negotiating screen time.

One review says “Screenagers” is sure to prompt conversations about family communication and responsible use of technology, especially if parents and children watch the documentary together.

Ruston’s previous documentaries include “Hidden Pictures: A Personal Story into Global Mental Health” that explores personal mental health stories in five countries, and “Unlisted: A Story of Schizophrenia” depicting her journey to reconnect with her father after hiding from him for 10 years.

Ruston has been a family physician in California and Washington. She completed a Fulbright Fellowship producing short films on mental health in India. She has been a keynote speaker on mental health topics at the World Health Organization and the United Nations.

Ruston is currently the filmmaker-in-residence at Stony Brook Medicine, NY.

About Sno-Isle Libraries
Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Leslie Franzen, Coupeville Library Branch Manager, 360-678-4911, lfranzen@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
09/26/2016

Updated:
09/28/2016
Registration opens Oct. 10 for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016

Registration to see and hear the region’s most fascinating thinkers, innovators and performers live onstage will open Oct. 10.

TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016 will take place on Friday, Nov. 18 at Edmonds Center for the Arts. Admission is free, but online registration is required at sno-isle.org/tedx.

TEDx logo

 

 

Watch the 2105 TEDxSnoIsleLibraries speaker videos!  

“This event quickly became a very hot item in 2015, our inaugural year,” said Ken Harvey, Sno-Isle Libraries Communications Director and TEDx organizer. “We encourage early registration.”

The event at Edmonds Center for the Arts will start at 9 a.m. and run through 4:30 p.m. with morning and afternoon breaks and a pause for lunch.

And who will be presenting that day?

“We’ll be making that announcement in the coming weeks,” Harvey said. “Our 2016 TEDx speakers are preparing a fascinating line-up of ideas for the audience.””

In addition to the speakers, the IdeaLab will again be part of the experience at Edmonds Center for the Arts.

“This year will include a new opportunity for TEDx attendees to interact with presenters and event sponsors and other organizations through idea and innovation spaces within the IdeaLab,” Harvey said. Attendees will also have an opportunity to meet Edmonds artist Mona T. Smiley-Fairbanks who was selected through the Snohomish County Arts Commission to serve as the 2016 TEDxSnoIsleLibraries event artist. “She is creating an interactive art installation which will be a centerpiece of the IdeaLab.”

Registration options will be available for full-day, half-day morning and half-day afternoon at Edmonds Center for the Arts, as well as 16 community viewing sites where the event will be livestreamed.

Viewing sites include 13 Sno-Isle Libraries facilities at Camano Island, Coupeville, Darrington, Edmonds, Freeland, Granite Falls, Lynnwood, Marysville, Monroe, Mukilteo, Oak Harbor, Snohomish and Stanwood.

Additional public viewing sites will be at the Snohomish Public Utilities District auditorium in Everett, the University of Washington Bothell and Edmonds Community College. No registration is required for those locations. 

Last year’s TEDxSnoIsleLibraries received overwhelmingly positive feedback from attendees, speakers and partners.

“It was a powerful day,” said Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, Executive Director of Sno-Isle Libraries. “The 2016 event reinforces Sno-Isle Libraries’ role in transforming communities, convening people for public discourse and programs that address community needs and interests.”

The 2015 event drew more than 700 attendees for the live event at Edmonds Center for the Arts and thousands more viewed the livestream at the public viewing sites or their own devices.

In 2015, speakers and performers took the stage with subjects ranging from innovation strategies to preparing for a NASA mission to Mars. Attendees and viewers also reflected a broad cross-section with an age range from 14 to over 80 and a geographic draw from British Columbia, California, Arizona, Texas, North Carolina and Massachusetts.

“It was clear as we prepared for last year’s event that we have a deep well of ideas and innovations in our region,” Harvey said. “We barely scratched the surface then on ideas which were submitted. Inspiring nominations of amazing people doing innovative work came to us from the speaker nomination process that we hosted last spring.”

The Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation is a key partner for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries.

“It’s critical to the purpose and values of the library district to make this event free for everyone, ensuring free and equal access to information and ideas,” said Paul Pitkin, Executive Director of the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. “Our support of TEDxSnoIsleLibraries was completely validated by our results in 2015.”

Other organizations that have chosen to become partners for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016 include:

  • The Daily Herald
  • Edmonds Center for the Arts
  • Alaska Airlines
  • United Way of Snohomish County
  • The Everett Clinic
  • Economic Alliance Snohomish County
  • Institute of Flight
  • Community Transit
  • Snohomish County Arts Commission
  • Leadership Snohomish County
  • Washington State University North Puget Sound
  • University of Washington Bothell
  • Coastal Community Bank
  • Edmonds Community College
  • Crosscut
  • Starbucks
  • Island County Economic Development Council
  • KSER
  • City of Edmonds
  • Heritage Bank
  • Whole Foods Market
  • Anderson Hunter
  • OverDrive
  • Innovative-Polaris
  • First Washington
  • Pacific Copy & Printing
  • Snohomish County Public Utility District
  • Everett Community College
  • ED! Edmonds Downtown Alliance

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

09/26/2016
Road trips are reading trips for Lake Stevens siblings
Saho (left) and Shogo Yamashita settle in with their books during a recent visit to the Lake Stevens Library. Both children were gold-medal winners in the Sno-Isle Libraries Explore Summer reading program, even continuing their reading logs while in summer school in Japan. Photo gallery

Reading-log jam

  • 107,870 – Hours of reading logged this summer by all participants
  • 4,217  - Bronze medal winners (10 hours of reading)
  • 1,965 - Silver medal winners (25 hours of reading)
  • 1,449 - Gold medal winners (50 hours of reading)

Saho and Shogo Yamashita are used to reading on the road.

The Lake Stevens brother and sister know that the trip to Kent for Shogo’s gymnastics lessons will take a good 90 minutes - each way - so they grab at least one book a piece for ride. “We read the whole way there and back,” said Saho, 11, and a sixth-grader at North Lake Middle School.

However, reading on the road took on a whole new meaning this summer when the family took a trip to Kobe, Japan that included a month-long summer-school stint. “The school is for Japanese children born abroad and whose parents want them to have a Japanese language and cultural experience,” said Hiroko Yamashita, the kids’ mom.

On this trip, the children did two languages and two cultures at the same time. “We took our books from the library and reading logs with us to Japan,” Saho said. “We went to school in Japanese and then read in English.”

The reading logs were part of Sno-Isle Libraries Explore Summer program, which receives funding support from the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. Participants who logged 10 hours of reading over the summer received bronze medals while 25 hours brought a silver medal. Readers who racked up 50 hours were gold-medal winners.

“Saho and Shogo easily surpassed the gold-medal mark,” said Yoko Cailotto, a staff member at the Lake Stevens Library.

Finding the Lake Stevens Library turned out to be a stroke of luck for the family that has been in Lake Stevens for less than a year after moving from Chicago.

“We had to leave behind most of our books,” Hiroko Yamashita said. “We were very excited to find the library here. (Saho and Shogo) like to read; they would rather read than do anything else.”

Ironically, it wasn’t books that first made them aware of the library.

“Saho saw a flyer for a Minecraft class I was teaching,” Cailotto said of the popular virtual-world video game. “Then, she got here and saw this is a library.”

That discovery turned into regular visits and, this past summer, the Explore Summer reading challenge.

“The reading logs helped me find more books and made me want to read more,” Saho said. “I’m still reading more than before, even though the logs are over.”

Shogo increased his reading pace, too, and both children are generally reading two to three books at a time. “I just pick the one that interests me most at the time,” Shogo said.

In school, both Saho and Shogo gravitate toward math as a favorite subject. Saho, says she likes graphing equations while 8-year-old Shogo, a third-grader at Sunnycrest Elementary, says he likes “times-ing.”

Saho said she does see differences between Chicago, Lake Stevens and Japan.

“School is very different,” she said. “In PE in Japan, they run a lot and there’s lots of testing. There are pools and everyone must take swimming lessons. Here, there are a lot of games.”

She said the weather is different, too. “Chicago has lots of snow and wind and the summer is short and hot,” she said. “Here, it is rainy and the summer is not hot.

The one thing that is the same no matter where they are is reading. While Saho finds it easier to read English and Shogo says reading Japanese goes a bit better for him, reading is the constant.

“We read as soon as we get up,” Shogo said. “If I’m bored, I read.”

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Sonia Gustafson, Managing Librarian Lake Stevens Library, 425-334-1900, sgustafson@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
09/20/2016
Voter registration coming to libraries on Sept. 27

Sno-Isle Libraries will be doing its part on National Voter Registration Day, Tuesday, Sept. 27, to help eligible residents get registered to vote in time for the Nov. 8 election.

“Sno-Isle Libraries is committed to building connected communities through civic engagement,” said Susan Hempstead, Strategic Relations Manager for the library district. “Our libraries are partnering with the League of Women Voters of Snohomish County to help ensure that everyone has a voice in the electoral process.  The choices we all make by voting matter to our communities.”

The League of Women Voters of Snohomish County is a local branch of the national organization. It is nonpartisan and dedicated to enabling voter registration, organizing candidate and issue forums and encouraging the informed and active participation of citizens in government.

“We’re very pleased to again be working with Sno-Isle Libraries to help more people become in knowledgeable about and involved with their government,” said Jody Trautwein, League Voter Service Chair.

On Sept. 27, League volunteers will assist with voter registration at eight libraries across the district.

  • Edmonds Library, 650 Main St., Edmonds 
  • Lynnwood Library, 19200 44th Ave W, Lynnwood
  • Marysville Library, 6120 Grove St., Marysville
  • Mill Creek Library, 15429 Bothell-Everett Hwy., Mill Creek 
  • Monroe Library, 1070 Village Way, Monroe 
  • Mountlake Terrace Library, 2330 58th Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace
  • Mukilteo Library, 4675 Harbour Point Blvd, Mukilteo
  • Snohomish Library, 311 Maple Ave., Snohomish

“National Voter Registration Day and this year’s partnership between the Sno-Isle Libraries and the Snohomish County League of Women Voters put the spotlight on the importance of registering to vote,” said Snohomish County Auditor Carolyn Weikel. “Today’s society represents, in part, the choices of yesterday’s voters.  Be part of shaping the future; register to vote today!”

To register to vote in Washington, you must be: 

  • A citizen of the United States 
  • A legal resident of Washington state and not claiming the right to vote in any other state
  • At least 18 years old by election day (Nov. 8, 2016) 
  • Not under the authority of the Department of Corrections 
  • Not disqualified from voting due to a court order

Registered voters who have recently changed addresses may also update their voter information to be ready to vote in November. 

For more information

About the League of Women Voters

The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization that encourages the informed and active participation of citizens in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy. 

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information, contact:

09/16/2016
Sound Transit 3 forum coming to Lynnwood Library

The Lynnwood Library will host a League of Women Voters forum on one of the defining issues for this region, transportation.

At 7 p.m., Monday, Sept. 19, advocates and opponents of the Sound Transit 3 (ST3) proposal will share their views of the project that will be on this November’s ballot.

Sno-Isle Libraries and League of Women Voters logos

Speakers will include Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff, who will outline the proposal; Shefali Ranganathan, Executive Director of Transportation Choices Coalition, speaking in favor of the measure; and Maggie Fimia, People for Smarter Transit – No on ST3, speaking in opposition. There will be an opportunity for the public to ask questions.

The forum will be in Lynnwood Library meeting room at 19200 44th Ave. W., Lynnwood. The event will be live-streamed by TVW.org.

According to League officials, because the ST3 proposal is so complex, it is sponsoring a forum in each sub-area of the Sound Transit district, which includes the Snohomish Sub-Area.

The League of Women Voters has not taken any position on ST3 and encourages voters to attend these forums to obtain substantial background for their voting choices. Sno-Isle Libraries doesn’t take positions on such issues. As part of its strategic plan, Sno-Isle Libraries supports convening people for public discourse, coordinating programs that address community needs and interests, and helps to build civic engagement.

About the League of Women Voters

The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization that encourages the informed and active participation of citizens in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy. 

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information, contact:

09/14/2016
Library and colleges offer help to displaced students

(An article published Sept. 14, 2016 by Daily Herald writer Kari Bray contributed to this story) 

The sudden closure of ITT Technical Institute campuses across the nation has hundreds of now-former students in this region looking for options.

business class photo
Sean Callaghan teaches a class in how to start a home-based business on Sept. 12, 2016 at Coupeville Library. The class is part of a business class series hosted by Sno-Isle Libraries.

Everett Community College is hosting an information session aimed at ex-ITT Tech students from 4-6 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 15, at Gray Wolf Hall, Room 166, 2000 Tower St., in Everett. Parking is free for the session and more information is available online or by calling 425-388-9219. Edmonds Community College launched a webpage for stranded ITT students.

Sno-Isle Libraries also has classes and resources that may help displaced students gain the skills and knowledge they need to continue their education or find a new path to employment.

“Our eLearning page features several learning tools, including Microsoft Imagine Academy, Lynda.com and LearningExpress that can be accessed with a no-charge Sno-Isle Libraries card,” said Lead Librarian for Business Kassy Rodeheaver. “We also have online access to funding databases for individual grantseekers, including students searching for scholarship information.”

For those looking to add skills to start a business, this fall Rodeheaver launched a series of classes aimed at helping entrepreneurs move from the idea stage to being in business.

The classes are scheduled at 11 libraries in five areas, including:

Registration for these classes is required and available through the class listings in the online calendar.

“Some areas have more or fewer classes based on the classes each library chose to host,” Rodeheaver said. “However, anyone can attend any of the sessions. They are all free and open to the public.”

ITT Tech is a for-profit college that last week announced the nationwide closures due to sanctions by the U.S. Department of Education. The federal agency in August decided that it would no longer allow ITT to enroll new students who receive federal financial aid. The Washington Student Achievement Council also barred the school from receiving state aid.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Kassy Rodeheaver, Lead Librarian - Business, 360-651-7017, krodeheaver@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

 

09/14/2016
'Read and Rock' hits right note for early literacy

The ABC song is more than just a fun way to learn the alphabet, it’s an early introduction to the critical life-long skill of reading.

 “Getting ready to read starts well-before a child gets to school,” said Joy Feldman, early learning coordinator for Sno-Isle Libraries. “Singing, talking, playing as well as reading and writing can all help lay the foundation for strong reading skills.”

Read and Rock graphic

Ready to Read and Rock?

To help young children get ready to read, Sno-Isle Libraries is hosting a series this fall that uses singing, music and movement. Feldman said the series called “Every Child Ready to Read and Rock!” features entertaining and engaging performers, many of whom also happen to be recognized experts in early literacy.

“Charlie Williams and Nancy Stewart are ‘The Chancy and Narly Show,’ but Nancy is also a national advocate for communities singing together and she has a strong early literacy background,” Feldman said.

Another performer in the series is Charlie Hope, winner of the Juno Award and three International Independent Music Awards. Also on the list is Christine Roberts, founder of Seattle-based Nurturing Pathways which focuses on the role movement plays in early childhood education. Ray Soriano, an early childhood educator and teaching musician, will use his West African drums and instruments to explore rhythms and Ian Dobson’s Steel Drum Party uses singing and dancing to engage and prepare young minds for reading.

“Parents and caregivers can bring children to these programs for a fun, entertaining experiences, but also know that they are providing an important learning opportunity,” Feldman said.

Supporting early literacy is part of the strategic plan of Sno-Isle Libraries.

“Our ‘Ready Readers’ program includes the five practices of reading readiness, talking, singing, reading, writing and playing,” Feldman said. “In addition to in-library programs, we have videos and resources for parents to help their children.”

Sno-Isle Libraries also offers a series of STARS classes aimed at early childhood educators, parents and caregivers. The free classes are led by Sno-Isle Libraries staff who are state-approved trainers and have an expertise in early literacy and early learning. The classes meet the ongoing professional development requirements outlined by the state Department of Early Learning.

“We know that these kinds of early literacy experiences can help prepare children for success as readers,” Feldman said.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Joy Feldman, Sno-Isle Libraries Early Learning Coordinator, 360-651-7105, jfeldman@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
09/07/2016

Updated:
09/13/2016
Business resources take entrepreneur's 3D printing idea to next dimension
Sam Hightower photo
Samuel Hightower holds two of the containers he makes using the 3D printers at "3D Buildtower," his kiosk-based business at the Everett Mall.

Looking for a little help?

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Some people like to say they are “serial entrepreneurs.” They get an idea, create a business and then move on to the next idea.

Samuel Hightower’s brain is just too full of ideas to wait for one project to finish before starting another; call him a “simultaneous entrepreneur.”

“I just like doing things I’ve never done before,” the 27-year-old said, standing in the middle of the Everett Mall next to his kiosk, “3D Buildtower,” an on-demand, 3D-printing service which opened for business in late May. “I always wanted to make my own business, I just wasn’t sure what or how.”

That’s when he bumped into Kassy Rodeheaver, lead librarian for business at Sno-Isle Libraries.

“I met Kassy at a SnoCo Makers meeting,” Hightower said of the maker-space group headquartered on Casino Road in Everett. “Kassy showed me the market research and databases available at Sno-Isle Libraries. It helped form my business.”

Rodeheaver says that visit to SnoCo Makers was a first for her, too. “I’d heard about them and wanted to check them out,” said Rodeheaver, who has a focus on helping entrepreneurs.

For Hightower, that meant showing him just what was available for free through the library.

“We have market research that can identify trends in an industry,” Rodeheaver said. “There are databases, company profiles, SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analyses and thousands of periodicals and news reports.”

Rodeheaver also referred Hightower to SCORE, the business mentoring service that now offers their services in four Sno-Isle Libraries community libraries.

“Every part of that web is important in terms of the business-support ecosystem,” Rodeheaver said. “And, they’re all available to everyone.”

That ecosystem helped Hightower launch his business.

“I now have two Leapfrog printers here and a scanner with two more printers at home,” he said. The printers use various kinds of plastic materials to print objects, anything from keyrings and business-card holders to cosplay masks and an arm.

An arm?

“A clothing manufacturer came by and wanted an arm to use as a model for some clothing,” Hightower said. “So, I used the handheld scanner, scanned the person’s arm and printed it in plastic, exactly the same size and shape as the real one.”

Hightower’s kiosk also has a sign, “3D artists wanted.”

“My training is in graphic design and art,” said Hightower, who came to the region from Minnesota in 2009, a two-year degree in hand. Once here, he enrolled at the Seattle Art Institute earned a Bachelor’s in Fine Arts degree.

“I want to bridge the gap between technology and art. Once I found what 3D printing can do, I felt so free to create,” he said. And he’s trying to bring that freedom, and business, to others, too. An artist can bring their file to Hightower and he’ll print and display it for sale in the mall.

“The artist gets most of the money, as they should. I keep enough for the material and small fee,” said Hightower, who also sells the printers he uses from The Netherlands-based company.

After doing the market research with Rodeheaver’s help, Hightower found that his mall-based business may be just one of a kind.

“There’s one at Mall of America (in Minnesota), but they scan your whole body and then print you in miniature,” he said. “My model is like a sign shop of 3D printing, which I did that, too, worked at a sign shop in Minnesota.”

Hightower brings all of his experiences together to make this business work, including the customer interaction: He was a member of the crew that opened the Microsoft store at University Village in Seattle.

“That was my first exposure to retail and I learned a lot there,” he said, adding that just getting the job was an education. “They had a job fair for all the finalists. There must have been 150 of us and all the other people were from Microsoft, watching us interact.”

It was while at the Microsoft store that Hightower says his interest in 3D printing began: “I became the local expert on 3D.”

The start-a-business bug bit in 2015.

“I jumped off the cliff,” Hightower said. “I let Microsoft go in August 2015. I was doing freelance web and design work and had this 3D idea. A buddy said, ‘Try the mall.’”

Hightower said he started talking to officials at Everett and Alderwood malls this past January and met Rodeheaver about the same time.

“I’ve had lots of help: Kassy, Kelly Gruol at SnoCo Makers; I got the (printers) from Kelly. And, I couldn’t do all this without the support of my grandparents,” he said. “As you would imagine, its 24-7 running a business.”

Yes, 24-7, but somehow Hightower finds time for other interests.

Hightower and his roommate are both halves of the duo, “Wombo Buxom.”

“We started playing music together and that became the group which became DJ’ing at clubs,” he said. According to their website, Wombo Buxom is “an audio visual design duo … (to) produce and DJ (electronic dance music) that will send you … to a place filled with hiphop and house drenched dance music.”

The duo perform at The Crocodile in Seattle and other venues in the area. The two worlds do overlap a bit, he said: “We wore the masks I printed, lit up with LED lights. It was a big hit.”

So what’s next?

“I like the technical aspect, the business side and the creative side. And, I’m interested in gaming,” he said. “I’m definitely juggling, but I have a high level of interest in creating whatever I can.”

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Kassy Rodeheaver, Lead Librarian - Business, 360-651-7017, krodeheaver@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
09/06/2016
Snohomish Library shows off new floors and layout
children at library photo
Children play in the children's area at the Snohomish Library on Sept. 6, 2016.

The Snohomish Library doors reopened at 9 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016 after being closed since Aug. 6 for a flooring project.

“Customers have been coming in waves all morning,” Managing Librarian Jude Anderson said on Sept. 6. “People are saying they really like the new carpet and flooring.”

Those sentiments were echoed by customer Alicia Percival, who was there with her two children and two of their friends and liked the new look. “We’ve been waiting for this day,” said the Lake Stevens-area resident. “This is our favorite library.”

The library was closed for a month for the project that replaced most of the flooring throughout the building. Some things got rearranged, during the closure, too.

Some material displays and furniture were moved, based on customer patterns. The media area was expanded and there is better browsing of reference and non-fiction materials, Anderson said. There are more quiet study areas now and power outlets have been added to more carrels.

The flooring work is part of ongoing maintenance and upgrades to the Snohomish facility in recent years. After energy efficiency upgrades in 2015, the building is using 17 percent less electricity and 70 percent less natural gas than in 2011.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Jude Anderson, managing Librarian, Snohomish Library, 360-651-4020, janderson@sno-isle.org
  • Chy Ross, District Manager, Community Libraries, 360-651-7015, cross@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
09/01/2016
Snohomish Library about to open with new carpet and layout
Workers at Snohomish Library photo

Workers install shelving at the Snohomish Library, getting it ready for the Sept. 6 re-opening after being closed a month for new carpeting and flooring.

See time-lapse video of the project!

Snohomish Library hours

Starting Sept. 6

  • Mon-Thu: 9 a.m.-8 p.m.
  • Fri-Sat: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
  • Sun: 1-5 p.m.

Note: All Snohomish Library services, including the meeting room mini-library, will be closed Sept. 2-5.

The Snohomish Library will re-open Tuesday, Sept. 6, following an extensive replacement of the flooring.

And Managing Librarian Jude Anderson says customers should be ready to be floored, too.

“We’ll be open and celebrating all day on Sept. 6, so come on over to the library,” Anderson said, Tuesday, Aug. 30. “The new carpeting looks just great, but we also took this month-long closure as an opportunity to rearrange some of our materials and services to give customers a better experience.”

While some of the shelving remained in place, other material displays and furniture have been moved. The adjustments are in response to the customer usage levels and patterns library staff were seeing.

“We have better browsing of reference and non-fiction materials,” Anderson said. Also, media materials such as CDs, DVDs and audiobooks get new, more accessible shelving and are now grouped with the appropriate age areas.

“Teen audiobooks are near the teen section; children’s music CDs are in the children’s section,” Anderson said.

The library also addressed carrels and study areas.

“We added quiet study areas to supplement the space available for groups,” Anderson said. “We’ve also added power access to study carrels for electronic devices.”

And, special attention was given to special collections.

“The international collection gets a high profile location and the classics collections is expanded to better meet high demand,” Anderson said.

While the library was closed, staff operated a mini-library out of the meeting room.

“That went very well,” Anderson said. “The mini-library was well-used and customers said they really appreciated the effort to keep some library services available.”

The flooring project that enabled all these changes went smoothly, said Brian Rush, facilities manager for Sno-Isle Libraries.

“The work went well and was actually ahead of schedule,” Rush said. “After 13 years of use in a public space, it was time to replace the carpet,” Rush said. The staff work area also had its hard floor replaced with hard tiles that are easy to replace but also more resistant to wear.

The flooring work is just part of ongoing maintenance and upgrades to the Snohomish facility in recent years. After energy efficiency upgrades in 2015, the building is using 17 percent less electricity and 70 percent less natural gas than in 2011.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Jude Anderson, managing Librarian, Snohomish Library, 360-651-4020, janderson@sno-isle.org
  • Chy Ross, District Manager, Community Libraries, 360-651-7015, cross@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
08/24/2016
Sno-Isle Libraries, City of Lake Stevens set stage for new library and civic facilities

Sno-Isle Libraries and the City of Lake Stevens will work together on a project that could result in a new library and civic facilities.

In separate meetings on Aug. 22 and 23, the library district Board of Trustees and the City Council passed an interlocal agreement that calls for both entities to jointly develop a site for a new, larger library as well as civic facilities for the city.

“We’re very pleased this interlocal agreement is in place,” Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. “Lake Stevens-area residents deserve a new, larger library. Sno-Isle Libraries, the City of Lake Stevens and the community have been working toward this for a long time.”

Lake Stevens Mayor John Spencer agreed that the time has come for expanded facilities to serve residents.

The mayor said the new site will place the library and civic facilities, including a new police station, closer to the center of the city’s population making services more easily available. “It’s great working together to develop these library and civic facilities,” Spencer said.

During this past Legislative session, lawmakers included funding to help remove some current city buildings that Spencer has called “totally inadequate.” The city is working on a Downtown Lake Stevens Subarea Plan focused on redeveloping city-owned property in the area and has established a citizens advisory committee for the subarea plan.

The Sno-Isle Libraries 2016-25 Capital Facilities Plan calls for replacing the Lake Stevens Library with a new, larger building. According to the plan approved this past month by the Board of Trustees, “The Lake Stevens Library is too small to meet existing and future community needs. Public comments collected for this plan indicate strong interest in building a new library within the community.”

The current library building is owned by the city and the city’s redevelopment plans preclude expanding the library at the current site.

The city has already purchased property in the Frontier Village area for potential civic-facilities use. With the interlocal agreement now in hand, library-district officials are working to finalize the purchase of property.

Once the library-district purchase is final, the interlocal agreement says the city and library district will work together to develop the site. A four-member committee, two from the city and two from the library district, would work out the details and supervise the process.

Both Woolf-Ivory and Spencer said they’re pleased with the agreement and the opportunity to bring increased service to residents.

“The current Lake Stevens Library is well-used and beloved, but it just isn’t meeting the needs of this growing community,” Woolf-Ivory said. “Sno-Isle Libraries is here to serve community members and they’ve told us they want a new library.”

Lake Stevens is one of the fastest growing cities in Snohomish County through annexations and an influx of families looking for affordable housing and good schools. Spencer has indicated the city will continue to grow. “We have areas that haven’t been annexed that we’re looking to annex and we’ve been growing a lot organically in the city,” the mayor told The Daily Herald newspaper in February.

About Sno-Isle Libraries
Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

About the City of Lake Stevens
With about 30,000 residents, the City of Lake Stevens is dedicated to improving, and diversifying the Lake Stevens economic and business climate. Our goal is to support a lively, active city where people can live, work and play.

For more information

  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
  • Mary Swenson, Interim City Administrator, 425-377-3230, mswenson@lakestevenswa.gov
08/22/2016
Lake Stevens Library at back-to-school event

Lake Stevens Library staff will be at a “Back to School Fair” scheduled for 10 a.m.-noon, Saturday, Aug. 27, at the Lake Stevens Boys & Girls Club, 1609 E. Lakeshore Drive, Lake Stevens.

“Children’s Librarian Monica Jackson will be there with information about the library and our programs for the coming school year,” Managing Librarian Sonia Gustafson said. “Lake Stevens students at Sunnyside Elementary won last year’s Third-Grade Reading Challenge and we’re looking forward to this coming school year.”

The event is sponsored by the Lake Stevens Family Center. 

08/11/2016
The Oak Harbor Library Board has an opening

There is an opening on the Oak Harbor Library Board.

Susan Norman photo
Susan Norman

Susan Norman, current president of the five-member board, is leaving the board on Dec. 31, 2016 due to term limits. Members the city board are appointed by the mayor with city council confirmation for a term of five years.  Each member may serve two terms. The other current board members are Pat Morse, Marshall Goldberg, Margaret Grunwald and Anne Sullivan. Mary Anderson, Oak Harbor Senior Services Administrator, serves as city staff liaison.

Board duties include providing advice and recommendations to the mayor and city council regarding general supervision and provision of library facilities and programs in accordance with the contract with Sno-Isle Libraries. In addition, the board members serve as liaison to share community needs, provide a forum for discussion, recommend programs, services and strategic focus, and to encourage best use of library facilities and resources.

The board meets quarterly at 2 p.m. on the second Wednesday of January, April, July and October in the Oak Harbor Library Meeting Room, 1000 SE Regatta Drive, Oak Harbor, WA 98277

Application and information packets are available at the library and the City of Oak Harbor website. Applicants must live in Oak Harbor in order to qualify. Applications may be submitted by email to the Oak Harbor City Clerk at athompson@oakharbor.org or by mail to: City of Oak Harbor, Attn: City Clerk, 865 SE Barrington Drive, Oak Harbor, WA 98277.

Applications must be received by 6 p.m., Sept. 30, 2016.

For more information, contact Oak Harbor Library Managing Librarian Mary Campbell, 360-675-5115 or mcampbell@sno-isle.org.

08/10/2016
Classes can help cultivate your business

Whether your business is sketched on a napkin or already pulling in customers, Sno-Isle Libraries has classes that can help take it to the next level.

Business classes graphic
Business class poster
The first in a series of 40 business-related classes at Sno-Isle Libraries is Saturday morning, Aug. 13, at the Lynnwood Library. See the full calendar of classes 

“We’re committed to helping start and grow businesses,” said Lead Librarian for Business Kassy Rodeheaver. Rodeheaver and community-library staff members have lined up 40 classes that start Aug. 13 and run through December at 11 libraries.

“We’ve got everything from ‘Steps to Starting a New Business’ to more advanced subjects such as ‘SEO and Getting Your Business to Rank on Google,’” Rodeheaver said. “And, lots more in-between.”

Teaching the classes are 10 local and regional experts in a variety of business-support areas. “I’m excited about the expertise of our presenters,” Rodeheaver said, adding that many have advanced business degrees and years of experience managing their own businesses. 

The list includes Jack Stiegler, who heads the Snohomish County branch of SCORE; Maya Sullivan, author of “Dare to Be Your Own Boss;” and Jean Simpson, of GROWashington and the Girandola Academy. Also, two presenters from the 2015 SnoIsleLibrariesTEDx, Anna Rohrbough and Matt Cail, will teach classes this fall.

Other presenters include Bob Hale, a franchising coach; Jane Wines, a senior benefits adviser with the U. S. Department of Labor’s Employee Benefits Security Administration; Sandy Bjorgen, a presentation and speaking coach; Robin Bush, on organizational structures, and Robbin  Block, on creative marketing strategies.

The classes are scheduled at 11 libraries in five areas, including:

Registration for these classes is required and available through the class listings in the online calendar.

“Some areas have more or fewer classes based on the classes each library chose to host,” Rodeheaver said. “However, anyone can attend any of the sessions. They are all free and open to the public.”

So why does Sno-Isle Libraries offer business classes? It’s a question Rodeheaver says she often hears.

“This region ranks near the top in the U.S. for entrepreneurship and business startups. Our strategic focus says ‘We will build economically sound communities (through) entrepreneur and small-business support,’” Rodeheaver said. “Library customers can access amazing market research databases and other resources related to business as a part of our regular services. These business-focused programs are an extension of our service.”

Rodeheaver added that these classes are just some of the ongoing business-support programs at Sno-Isle Libraries. “We’ve got programs going on all the time in our libraries and we’re adding new resources and new offerings; just check for the latest at our website, sno-isle.org/business.”

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Washington’s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.

For more information

 

08/09/2016
Music series coming to Edmonds Library

library and art logos

A new music series is coming to the Edmonds Library in partnership with the City of Edmonds Arts Commission.

“We’re excited to bring entertaining and informative musical performances to the library,” said Edmonds Library Managing Librarian Richard Suico. The series will be in the Plaza Room above the library. Three of the scheduled five events will coincide with Art Walk Edmonds on the third Thursday of the month.

  • On Thursday, Oct. 20 at 6:30 p.m., world flute artist and storyteller Gary Stroutsos will present a tribute to the tradition of song and story in the Zuni, Navajo and Salish cultures. The event will include a showing of "Remembering the Songs," - a 30-minute film offering a glimpse of the music-makers of the Diné, Zuni, and Salish communities. Stroutsos will play his traditional American Indian made flutes and answer questions following the presentation.
  • On Thursday, Nov. 17 at 6:30 p.m., The Hot Club of Troy will present a musical performance and education about the jazz and life of the Belgian-born French jazz guitar genius Django Reinhardt. The Langley-based Hot Club of Troy features Troy Chapman, guitar; Keith Bowers, guitar, and Kristi O'Donnell, bass.
  • On Thursday, Jan. 19 at 6:30 p.m., Bryan Stratton will guide listeners through the lives and music of Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, the Beatles and other influential singer-songwriters of the ’60s. Library regulars may recognize Stratton, a Sno-Isle Libraries staff member, who uses his music-education degree to perform and inform at many libraries and other venues in the area.
  • On Saturday, Feb. 4 at 2 p.m., the DownTown Mountain Boys will preview Wintergrass 2017 with a 45-minute performance. After performing, the band will stay for a jam session and audience members are encouraged bring an instrument to join in or just stay and listen. The DownTown Mountain Boys include Paul Elliott, violin; Don Share, guitar, lead and harmony vocals; Dave Keenan, banjo, lead and harmony vocals; Terry Enyeart, bass, lead and harmony vocals; and Tom Moran, mandolin.

Suico said the March, 2017, event is still in the planning stages.

The City of Edmonds Arts Commission and the library are collaborating on the series, based on the intersecting values that build on and foster the power of community and cultural experiences. “The City of Edmonds Arts Commission is excited to be a partner with the library on this program,” said Frances Chapin, Edmonds Arts & Culture Manager.

“Over the years, Sno-Isle Libraries has developed relationships with many local performers. We’re so happy to be able to bring some of our friends to Edmonds for this series,” Suico said. “We’re also thankful to the Friends of Edmonds Library. They gladly fund many of these events and we appreciate seeing their hard volunteer work expressed in high quality programs for community.”

About Sno-Isle Libraries
Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Washington’s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Richard Suico, Managing Llibrarian Edmonds Llibrary, 425-771-1933, rsuico@sno-isle.org
  • Frances White Chapin, Edmonds Arts & Culture Manager, 425-771-228, frances.chapin@edmondswa.gov
  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
08/08/2016
Project floors Snohomish Library in August

library customers photo

Snohomish Library customers use the "mini-library" that is open Aug. 8-31 while flooring is replaced in the main library. The full library will re-open Sept. 6. Photo gallery

The main area of the Snohomish Library building will be closed through Sept. 5 for a carpeting and flooring project.

Terminator flooring machine photo
A worker operates the "Terminator," a machine that removes old flooring, as part of the work at the Snohomish Library.

During the closure, a “mini-library” is open in the building’s meeting room from 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Mondays-Saturdays and 1-5 p.m. on Sundays. Available services include picking up materials on hold, returning materials, checkout materials, wi-fi, accepting Explore Summer logs and handing out prizes. No public computers and no public restrooms will be available during the project.

The full library will re-open on Sept. 6.

“This is a standard replacement and update cycle of carpeting for us. After 13 years of use in a public space we would expect to be replacing the carpet,” said Brian Rush, facilities manager for Sno-Isle Libraries. Most of the carpet and flooring in the 23,000-square-foot library is original to when it was built in 2003.

Flooring in the public areas of the library were a combination of carpet tiles and rolled carpet. The new material will be all carpet tiles to make it easier to replace damaged or worn areas. The staff work area was a hard flooring material that had been put down in one piece. Rush said the replacement material will also be tiles and much more resistant to wear.

The flooring work is just part of ongoing maintenance and upgrades to the Snohomish facility in recent years. After energy efficiency upgrades in 2015, the building is using 17 percent less electricity and 70 percent less natural gas than in 2011.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Washington’s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.

For more information


There is not such a cradle of democracy upon the earth as the Free Public Library,
this republic of letters, where neither rank, office, nor wealth receives the slightest consideration.
- Andrew Carnegie


Sno-Isle Libraries Administrative & Service Center
7312 35th Ave NE, Marysville, WA 98271-7417
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