Sno-Isle Libraries News Releases http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington's Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels. Tue, 27 Sep 2016 00:08:37 GMT 'Screenagers' film looks at screen-time issues and impacts http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=283 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="line-height:22.4px; width:250px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Screenagers movie poster" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/2604/2604_20160825050056.png" style="height:350px; width:250px" /></td> <td><img alt="Delaney Ruston photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/2604/2604_20160825050204.jpg" style="float:left; font-family:sans-serif,arial,verdana,trebuchet ms; height:349px; line-height:22.4px; width:250px" /> <div>&nbsp;</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><em>Delaney Ruston</em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Screen time.</p> <p>Delaney Ruston is well-versed on the level of chaos that can erupt when a parent utters those two simple words to a child staring at a computer, smartphone or game console.</p> <p>The filmmaker and physician examines the impacts of screen time on children, teenagers and their families in her 2016 documentary, <a href="http://www.screenagersmovie.com/">&ldquo;Screenagers: Growing Up in the Digital Age.&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;The film will is scheduled for showing at both the Monroe and Coupeville libraries:</p> <ul> <li>Monroe Library,&nbsp;6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 5, and again at 11 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 8</li> <li><span style="background-color:rgb(255, 255, 255); font-family:calibri,arial,helevetica; font-size:medium">Coupeville&nbsp;Library,&nbsp;6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 5, and again at 2&nbsp;p.m., Saturday, Oct. 8</span></li> </ul> <p>Ruston uses her own experience to probe the corners of family life and explore struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. A former University of Washington faculty member, Ruston saw her own children turning toward a screen-based world and learned that the average U.S. young person spends 6.5 hours a day looking at screens. Ruston decided to look into the possible impacts of all this time and about the friction occurring in homes and schools around negotiating screen time.</p> <p>One review says &ldquo;Screenagers&rdquo; is sure to prompt conversations about family communication and responsible use of technology, especially if parents and children watch the documentary together.</p> <p>Ruston&rsquo;s previous documentaries include &ldquo;Hidden Pictures: A Personal Story into Global Mental Health&rdquo; that explores personal mental health stories in five countries, and &ldquo;Unlisted: A Story of Schizophrenia&rdquo; depicting her journey to reconnect with her father after hiding from him for 10 years.</p> <p>Ruston has been a family physician in California and Washington. She completed a Fulbright Fellowship producing short films on mental health in India. She has been a keynote speaker on mental health topics at the World Health Organization and the United Nations.</p> <p>Ruston is currently the filmmaker-in-residence at Stony Brook Medicine, NY.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services&nbsp;and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Phil Spirito, Monroe Library Managing Librarian, 360-7647851, pspirito@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Leslie Franzen, Coupeville&nbsp;Library Branch Manager, 360-678-4911, lfranzen@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=283 'Screenagers' film looks at screen-time issues and impacts http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=284 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="line-height:22.4px; width:250px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Screenagers movie poster" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/2604/2604_20160825050056.png" style="height:350px; width:250px" /></td> <td><img alt="Delaney Ruston photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/2604/2604_20160825050204.jpg" style="float:left; font-family:sans-serif,arial,verdana,trebuchet ms; height:349px; line-height:22.4px; width:250px" /> <div>&nbsp;</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> <td><em>Delaney Ruston</em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Screen time.</p> <p>Delaney Ruston is well-versed on the level of chaos that can erupt when a parent utters those two simple words to a child staring at a computer, smartphone or game console.</p> <p>The filmmaker and physician examines the impacts of screen time on children, teenagers and their families in her 2016 documentary,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.screenagersmovie.com/">&ldquo;Screenagers: Growing Up in the Digital Age.&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;The film will show at the Coupeville&nbsp;Library at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 5, and again at 2&nbsp;p.m., Saturday, Oct. 8</p> <p>Ruston uses her own experience to probe the corners of family life and explore struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. A former University of Washington faculty member, Ruston saw her own children turning toward a screen-based world and learned that the average U.S. young person spends 6.5 hours a day looking at screens. Ruston decided to look into the possible impacts of all this time and about the friction occurring in homes and schools around negotiating screen time.</p> <p>One review says &ldquo;Screenagers&rdquo; is sure to prompt conversations about family communication and responsible use of technology, especially if parents and children watch the documentary together.</p> <p>Ruston&rsquo;s previous documentaries include &ldquo;Hidden Pictures: A Personal Story into Global Mental Health&rdquo; that explores personal mental health stories in five countries, and &ldquo;Unlisted: A Story of Schizophrenia&rdquo; depicting her journey to reconnect with her father after hiding from him for 10 years.</p> <p>Ruston has been a family physician in California and Washington. She completed a Fulbright Fellowship producing short films on mental health in India. She has been a keynote speaker on mental health topics at the World Health Organization and the United Nations.</p> <p>Ruston is currently the filmmaker-in-residence at Stony Brook Medicine, NY.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services&nbsp;and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Leslie Franzen, Coupeville&nbsp;Library Branch Manager, 360-678-4911, lfranzen@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=284 Get tickets for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016 starting Oct. 10 http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=295 <p>Registration to see and hear the region&rsquo;s most fascinating thinkers, innovators and performers live onstage will open Oct. 10.</p> <p>TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016 will take place on Friday, Nov. 18 at Edmonds Center for the Arts. Tickets are free, but online registration is required at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/tedx">sno-isle.org/tedx</a>.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="TEDx logo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160926123715.jpg" style="float:left; height:92px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&ldquo;These tickets quickly became very hot items in 2015, our inaugural year,&rdquo; said Ken Harvey, Sno-Isle Libraries Communications Director and TEDx organizer. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve already had a number of people asking when tickets will be available and we encourage early registration.&rdquo;</p> <p>The event at Edmonds Center for the Arts will start at 9 a.m. and run through 4:30 p.m. with morning and afternoon breaks and a pause for lunch.</p> <p>And who will be presenting that day?</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ll be making that announcement in the coming weeks,&rdquo; Harvey said. &ldquo;I can tell you that it is a very exciting lineup. We&rsquo;re working with the nominees now and I think it&rsquo;s going to be transformational.&rdquo;</p> <p>In addition to the speakers, the IdeaLab will again be part of the experience at Edmonds Center for the Arts.</p> <p>&ldquo;This year, the IdeaLab will include an opportunity for attendees to interact with the presenters and our event sponsors,&rdquo; Harvey said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m also excited about a really interesting interactive art installation, with the support of the Snohomish County Arts Commission, by Edmonds artist Mona T. Smiley-Fairbanks that will also be in the Idea Lab.&rdquo;</p> <p>Registration options will be available for full-day, half-day morning and half-day afternoon at Edmonds Center for the Arts, as well as 16 community viewing sites where the event will be livestreamed.</p> <p>Viewing sites include 13 Sno-Isle Libraries facilities at Camano Island, Coupeville, Darrington, Edmonds, Freeland, Granite Falls, Lynnwood, Marysville, Monroe, Mukilteo, Oak Harbor, Snohomish and Stanwood.</p> <p>Additional public viewing sites will be at the Snohomish Public Utilities District auditorium in Everett, the University of Washington Bothell and Edmonds Community College. No registration is required for those locations.&nbsp;</p> <p>Last year&rsquo;s TEDxSnoIsleLibraries received overwhelmingly positive feedback from attendees, speakers and partners.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was a powerful day,&rdquo; said Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, Executive Director of Sno-Isle Libraries. &ldquo;The 2016 event reinforces Sno-Isle Libraries&rsquo; role in transforming communities, convening people for public discourse and programs that address community needs and interests.&rdquo;</p> <p>The 2015 event drew more than 700 attendees for the live event at Edmonds Center for the Arts and thousands more viewed the livestream at the public viewing sites or their own devices.</p> <p>In 2015, <a href="http://sno-isle.org/tedx/speakers">speakers and performers</a> took the stage with subjects ranging from innovation strategies to preparing for a NASA mission to Mars. Attendees and viewers also reflected a broad cross-section with an age range from 14 to over 80 and a geographic draw from British Columbia, California, Arizona, Texas, North Carolina and Massachusetts.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was clear as we prepared for last year&rsquo;s event that we have a deep well of ideas and innovations in our region,&rdquo; Harvey said. &ldquo;We barely scratched the surface then on ideas which were submitted. Inspiring nominations of amazing people doing innovative work came to us from the speaker nomination process that we hosted last spring.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation is a key partner for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s critical to the purpose and values of the library district to make this event free for everyone, ensuring free and equal access to information and ideas,&rdquo; said Paul Pitkin, Executive Director of the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. &ldquo;Our support of TEDxSnoIsleLibraries was completely validated by our results in 2015.&rdquo;</p> <p>Other organizations that have chosen to become partners for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016 include:</p> <ul> <li>The Daily Herald</li> <li>Edmonds Center for the Arts</li> <li>Alaska Airlines</li> <li>United Way of Snohomish County</li> <li>The Everett Clinic</li> <li>Economic Alliance Snohomish County</li> <li>Institute of Flight</li> <li>Community Transit</li> <li>Snohomish County Arts Commission</li> <li>Leadership Snohomish County</li> <li>Washington State University North Puget Sound</li> <li>University of Washington Bothell</li> <li>Coastal Community Bank</li> <li>Edmonds Community College</li> <li>Crosscut</li> <li>Starbucks</li> <li>Island County Economic Development Council</li> <li>KSER</li> <li>City of Edmonds</li> <li>Heritage Bank</li> <li>Whole Foods Market</li> <li>Anderson Hunter</li> <li>OverDrive</li> <li>Innovative-Polaris</li> <li>First Washington</li> <li>Pacific Copy &amp; Printing</li> <li>Snohomish County Public Utility District</li> <li>Everett Community College</li> <li>ED! Edmonds Downtown Alliance</li> </ul> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries </strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Ken Harvey, Communications Director,&nbsp;360-651-7030, <a href="mailto:kharvey@sno-isle.org">kharvey@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Susan Hempstead, Sno-Isle Libraries Strategic Relations Manager, 360-651-7013, <a href="mailto:shempstead@sno-isle.org">shempstead@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=295 Road trips are reading trips for Lake Stevens siblings http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=296 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160926010701.jpg" style="float:left; height:333px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Saho (left) and Shogo Yamashita settle in with their books during a recent visit to the Lake Stevens Library. Both children were gold-medal winners in the Sno-Isle Libraries Explore Summer reading program, even continuing their reading logs while in summer school in Japan. <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskE3DWvS">Photo gallery</a></em></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h3>Reading-log jam</h3> <ul> <li>107,870 &ndash; Hours of reading logged this summer by all participants</li> <li>4,217&nbsp; - Bronze medal winners (10 hours of reading)</li> <li>1,965 - Silver medal winners (25 hours of reading)</li> <li>1,449 - Gold medal winners (50 hours of reading)</li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Saho and Shogo Yamashita are used to reading on the road.</p> <p>The Lake Stevens brother and sister know that the trip to Kent for Shogo&rsquo;s gymnastics lessons will take a good 90 minutes - each way - so they grab at least one book a piece for ride. &ldquo;We read the whole way there and back,&rdquo; said Saho, 11, and a sixth-grader at North Lake Middle School.</p> <p>However, reading on the road took on a whole new meaning this summer when the family took a trip to Kobe, Japan that included a month-long summer-school stint. &ldquo;The school is for Japanese children born abroad and whose parents want them to have a Japanese language and cultural experience,&rdquo; said Hiroko Yamashita, the kids&rsquo; mom.</p> <p>On this trip, the children did two languages and two cultures at the same time. &ldquo;We took our books from the library and reading logs with us to Japan,&rdquo; Saho said. &ldquo;We went to school in Japanese and then read in English.&rdquo;</p> <p>The reading logs were part of Sno-Isle Libraries Explore Summer program, which receives funding support from the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. Participants who logged 10 hours of reading over the summer received bronze medals while 25 hours brought a silver medal. Readers who racked up 50 hours were gold-medal winners.</p> <p>&ldquo;Saho and Shogo easily surpassed the gold-medal mark,&rdquo; said Yoko Cailotto, a staff member at the Lake Stevens Library.</p> <p>Finding the Lake Stevens Library turned out to be a stroke of luck for the family that has been in Lake Stevens for less than a year after moving from Chicago.</p> <p>&ldquo;We had to leave behind most of our books,&rdquo; Hiroko Yamashita said. &ldquo;We were very excited to find the library here. (Saho and Shogo) like to read; they would rather read than do anything else.&rdquo;</p> <p>Ironically, it wasn&rsquo;t books that first made them aware of the library.</p> <p>&ldquo;Saho saw a flyer for a Minecraft class I was teaching,&rdquo; Cailotto said of the popular virtual-world video game. &ldquo;Then, she got here and saw this is a library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That discovery turned into regular visits and, this past summer, the Explore Summer reading challenge.</p> <p>&ldquo;The reading logs helped me find more books and made me want to read more,&rdquo; Saho said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m still reading more than before, even though the logs are over.&rdquo;</p> <p>Shogo increased his reading pace, too, and both children are generally reading two to three books at a time. &ldquo;I just pick the one that interests me most at the time,&rdquo; Shogo said.</p> <p>In school, both Saho and Shogo gravitate toward math as a favorite subject. Saho, says she likes graphing equations while 8-year-old Shogo, a third-grader at Sunnycrest Elementary, says he likes &ldquo;times-ing.&rdquo;</p> <p>Saho said she does see differences between Chicago, Lake Stevens and Japan.</p> <p>&ldquo;School is very different,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;In PE in Japan, they run a lot and there&rsquo;s lots of testing. There are pools and everyone must take swimming lessons. Here, there are a lot of games.&rdquo;</p> <p>She said the weather is different, too. &ldquo;Chicago has lots of snow and wind and the summer is short and hot,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Here, it is rainy and the summer is not hot.</p> <p>The one thing that is the same no matter where they are is reading. While Saho finds it easier to read English and Shogo says reading Japanese goes a bit better for him, reading is the constant.</p> <p>&ldquo;We read as soon as we get up,&rdquo; Shogo said. &ldquo;If I&rsquo;m bored, I read.&rdquo;</p> <h3>About Sno-Isle Libraries</h3> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <h3>For more information</h3> <ul> <li>Sonia Gustafson, Managing Librarian Lake Stevens Library, 425-334-1900, sgustafson@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> Mon, 26 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=296 Voter registration coming to libraries on Sept. 27 http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=294 <p><img alt="" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160920051244.jpg" style="float:right; height:127px; width:500px" />Sno-Isle Libraries will be doing its part on National Voter Registration Day, Tuesday, Sept. 27, to help eligible residents get registered to vote in time for the Nov. 8 election.</p> <p>&ldquo;Sno-Isle Libraries is committed to building connected communities through civic engagement,&rdquo; said Susan Hempstead, Strategic Relations Manager for the library district. &ldquo;Our libraries are partnering with the League of Women Voters of Snohomish County to help ensure that everyone has a voice in the electoral process.&nbsp; The choices we all make by voting matter to our communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>The League of Women Voters of Snohomish County is a local branch of the national organization. It is nonpartisan and dedicated to enabling voter registration, organizing candidate and issue forums and encouraging the informed and active participation of citizens in government.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re very pleased to again be working with Sno-Isle Libraries to help more people become in knowledgeable about and involved with their government,&rdquo; said Jody Trautwein, League Voter Service Chair.</p> <p>On Sept. 27, League volunteers will assist with&nbsp;voter registration at eight libraries across the district.</p> <ul> <li>Edmonds Library, 650 Main St., Edmonds&nbsp;</li> <li>Lynnwood Library, 19200 44<sup>th</sup> Ave W, Lynnwood</li> <li>Marysville Library, 6120 Grove St., Marysville</li> <li>Mill Creek Library, 15429 Bothell-Everett Hwy., Mill Creek&nbsp;</li> <li>Monroe Library, 1070 Village Way, Monroe&nbsp;</li> <li>Mountlake Terrace Library, 2330 58<sup>th</sup> Ave. W, Mountlake Terrace</li> <li>Mukilteo Library, 4675 Harbour Point Blvd, Mukilteo</li> <li>Snohomish Library, 311 Maple Ave., Snohomish</li> </ul> <p>&ldquo;National Voter Registration Day and this year&rsquo;s partnership between the Sno-Isle Libraries and the Snohomish County League of Women Voters put the spotlight on the importance of registering to vote,&rdquo; said Snohomish County Auditor Carolyn Weikel. &ldquo;Today&rsquo;s society represents, in part, the choices of yesterday&rsquo;s voters.&nbsp; Be part of shaping the future; register to vote today!&rdquo;</p> <p>To register to vote in Washington, you must be:&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>A citizen of the United States&nbsp;</li> <li>A legal resident of Washington state and not claiming the right to vote in any other state</li> <li>At least 18 years old by election day (Nov. 8, 2016)&nbsp;</li> <li><a href="https://wei.sos.wa.gov/agency/osos/en/voters/Pages/felons_and_voting_rights.aspx" target="_blank">Not under the authority of the Department of Corrections</a>&nbsp;</li> <li>Not disqualified from voting due to a court order</li> </ul> <p>Registered voters who have recently changed addresses may also update their voter information to be ready to vote in November.&nbsp;</p> <p>For more information</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.lwvsnoho.org/">League of women Voters of Snohomish County</a></li> <li><a href="https://snohomishcountywa.gov/224/Elections-Voter-Registration">Snohomish County elections</a></li> <li><a href="http://sno-isle.org/elections">Sno-Isle Libraries election information</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.sos.wa.gov/elections/">Washington Secretary of State</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.nationalvoterregistrationday.org/">National Voter Registration Day</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>About the League of Women Voters</strong></p> <p>The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization that encourages the informed and active participation of citizens in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information, contact:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Susan Hempstead, Sno-Isle Libraries Strategic Relations Manager, 360-651-7013,&nbsp;<a href="mailto:shempstead@sno-isle.org">shempstead@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050,&nbsp;<a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Tue, 20 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=294 Sound Transit 3 forum coming to Lynnwood Library http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=293 <p>The Lynnwood Library will host a League of Women Voters forum on one of the defining issues for this region, transportation.</p> <p>At 7 p.m., Monday, Sept. 19, advocates and opponents of the Sound Transit 3 (ST3) proposal will share their views of the project that will be on this November&rsquo;s ballot.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Sno-Isle Libraries and League of Women Voters logos" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160916025928.jpg" style="float:left; height:127px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Speakers will include Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff, who will outline the proposal; Shefali Ranganathan, Executive Director of Transportation Choices Coalition, speaking in favor of the measure; and Maggie Fimia, People for Smarter Transit &ndash; No on ST3, speaking in opposition. There will be an opportunity for the public to ask questions.</p> <p>The forum will be in Lynnwood Library meeting room at 19200 44th Ave. W., Lynnwood. The event will be <a href="http://www.tvw.org/watch/?eventID=2016091093">live-streamed</a> by TVW.org.</p> <p>According to League officials, because the ST3 proposal is so complex, it is sponsoring a forum in each sub-area of the Sound Transit district, which includes the Snohomish Sub-Area.</p> <p>The League of Women Voters has not taken any position on ST3 and encourages voters to attend these forums to obtain substantial background for their voting choices. Sno-Isle Libraries doesn&rsquo;t take positions on such issues. As part of its strategic plan, Sno-Isle Libraries supports convening people for public discourse, coordinating programs that address community needs and interests, and helps to build civic engagement.</p> <p><strong>About the League of Women Voters</strong></p> <p>The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan political organization that encourages the informed and active participation of citizens in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information, contact:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Cynthia Stewart, Vice President League of Women Voters of Washington Education Fund, 206-310-8965, <a href="mailto:stewdahl@comcast.net">stewdahl@comcast.net</a></li> <li>Susan Hempstead, Sno-Isle Libraries Strategic Relations Manager, 360-651-7013, <a href="mailto:shempstead@sno-isle.org">shempstead@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Michael Delury, Lynnwood Managing Librarian, 425-778-2148, <a href="mailto:mdelury@sno-isle.org">mdelury@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Fri, 16 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=293 Library and colleges offer help to displaced students http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=288 <p><em>(<a href="http://www.heraldnet.com/news/local-colleges-reaching-out-to-help-former-itt-tech-students/">An article</a>&nbsp;published Sept. 14, 2016 by Daily Herald writer Kari Bray contributed to this story)&nbsp;</em></p> <p>The sudden closure of ITT Technical Institute campuses across the nation has hundreds of now-former students in this region looking for options.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:400px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="business class photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160914113012.jpg" style="float:left; height:286px; width:400px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Sean Callaghan teaches a class in how to start a home-based business on Sept. 12, 2016 at Coupeville Library. The class is part of a <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/business-events">business class series</a> hosted by Sno-Isle Libraries.</em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Everett Community College is hosting an information session aimed at ex-ITT Tech students from 4-6 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 15, at Gray Wolf Hall, Room 166, 2000 Tower St., in Everett. Parking is free for the session and <a href="http://www.everettcc.edu/">more information</a> is available online or by calling 425-388-9219.&nbsp;Edmonds Community College <a href="http://www.edcc.edu/itt/">launched a webpage</a> for stranded ITT students.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries also has classes and resources that may help displaced students gain the skills and knowledge they need to continue their education or find a new path to employment.</p> <p>&ldquo;Our <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/elearning">eLearning</a> page features several learning tools, including Microsoft Imagine Academy, Lynda.com and LearningExpress that can be accessed with a no-charge Sno-Isle Libraries card,&rdquo; said Lead Librarian for Business Kassy Rodeheaver. &ldquo;We also have online access to funding databases for <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/grantseekers/">individual grantseekers</a>, including students searching for scholarship information.&rdquo;</p> <p>For those looking to add skills to start a business, this fall&nbsp;Rodeheaver launched a series of classes aimed at helping entrepreneurs move from the idea stage to being in business.</p> <p>The classes are scheduled at 11 libraries in five areas, including:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=11&amp;ln=13&amp;ln=15">South</a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=11">Lynnwood</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=13">Mill Creek</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=15">Mountlake Terrace</a></li> </ul> </li> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=8">East</a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=8">Granite Falls</a></li> </ul> </li> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=19&amp;ln=2">North</a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=19">Stanwood</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=2">Camano Island</a></li> </ul> </li> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=17&amp;ln=4">North Whidbey</a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=17&amp;ln=4">Oak Harbor</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=4">Coupeville</a></li> </ul> </li> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=7&amp;ln=10&amp;ln=3">South Whidbey</a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=3">Clinton</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=10">Langley</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=7">Freeland</a></li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>Registration for these classes is required and available through the&nbsp;<a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=7&amp;ln=10&amp;ln=3&amp;ln=11&amp;ln=13&amp;ln=15&amp;ln=17&amp;ln=4&amp;ln=2&amp;ln=19&amp;ln=8">class listings in the online calendar.</a></p> <p>&ldquo;Some areas have more or fewer classes based on the classes each library chose to host,&rdquo; Rodeheaver said. &ldquo;However, anyone can attend any of the sessions. They are all free and open to the public.&rdquo;</p> <p>ITT Tech is a for-profit college that last week announced the nationwide closures due to sanctions by the U.S. Department of Education. The federal agency in August decided that it would no longer allow ITT to enroll new students who receive federal financial aid. The Washington Student Achievement Council also barred the school from receiving state aid.</p> <h4>About Sno-Isle Libraries</h4> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <h4>For more information</h4> <ul> <li>Kassy Rodeheaver, Lead Librarian - Business, 360-651-7017, krodeheaver@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 14 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=288 'Read and Rock' hits right note for early literacy http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=289 <p>The ABC song is more than just a fun way to learn the alphabet, it&rsquo;s an early introduction to the critical life-long skill of reading.</p> <p>&nbsp;&ldquo;Getting ready to read starts well-before a child gets to school,&rdquo; said Joy Feldman, early&nbsp;learning&nbsp;coordinator for Sno-Isle Libraries. &ldquo;Singing, talking, playing as well as reading and writing can all help lay the foundation for strong reading skills.&rdquo;</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Read and Rock graphic" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160914021307.jpg" style="float:left; height:146px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h3>Ready to Read and Rock?</h3> <ul> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?ag=Preschool%2C+School-Age&amp;et=Family+Program&amp;kw=Rock&amp;dt=dr&amp;ds=2016-9-1&amp;de=2016-10-31&amp;df=list&amp;cn=0&amp;private=0&amp;ln=ALL">Checkout the online calender</a></li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>To help young children get ready to read, Sno-Isle Libraries is hosting a&nbsp;series this fall that uses&nbsp;singing, music and movement. Feldman said the series called &ldquo;Every Child Ready to Read and Rock!&rdquo; features entertaining and engaging performers, many of whom&nbsp;also happen to be recognized experts in early literacy.</p> <p>&ldquo;Charlie Williams and Nancy Stewart are &lsquo;The Chancy and Narly Show,&rsquo; but Nancy is also a national advocate for communities singing together and she has a strong early literacy background,&rdquo; Feldman said.</p> <p>Another performer in the series is Charlie Hope, winner of the Juno Award and three International Independent Music Awards. Also on the list is Christine Roberts, founder of Seattle-based Nurturing Pathways which focuses on the role movement plays in early childhood education. Ray Soriano, an early childhood educator and teaching musician, will use his West African drums and instruments to explore rhythms and Ian Dobson&rsquo;s Steel Drum Party uses singing and dancing to engage and prepare young minds for reading.</p> <p>&ldquo;Parents and caregivers can bring children to these programs for a fun, entertaining experiences, but also know that they are providing an important learning opportunity,&rdquo; Feldman said.</p> <p>Supporting early literacy is part of the strategic plan of Sno-Isle Libraries.</p> <p>&ldquo;Our &lsquo;Ready Readers&rsquo; program includes the five practices of reading readiness, talking, singing, reading, writing and playing,&rdquo; Feldman said. &ldquo;In addition to in-library programs, we have <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/kids/learning">videos and resources for parents</a> to help their children.&rdquo;</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries also offers a series of <a href="http://sno-isle.org/kids/stars">STARS classes</a> aimed at early childhood educators, parents and caregivers. The free classes are led by Sno-Isle Libraries staff who are state-approved trainers and have an expertise in early literacy and early learning. The classes meet the ongoing professional development requirements outlined by the state Department of Early Learning.</p> <p>&ldquo;We know that these kinds of early literacy experiences can help prepare children for success as readers,&rdquo; Feldman said.</p> <h4>About Sno-Isle Libraries</h4> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <h4>For more information</h4> <ul> <li>Joy Feldman, Sno-Isle Libraries Early Learning Coordinator, 360-651-7105, jfeldman@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> Wed, 14 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=289 Ready to Rock and Read events in south Snohomish County http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=290 <p>Dear media representative,</p> <p>Earlier this afternoon, I sent a new release regarding a Sno-Isle Libraries program called &quot;Ready to Rock and Read.&quot; The release includes a link to our online calendar, but I thought I&#39;d send along&nbsp;a list (see below)&nbsp;of program events and dates in your area. Thanks for your consideration of our news and for all&nbsp;the important work you do for our communities.</p> <p>Jim Hills<br /> Public Information Manager<br /> Sno-Isle Libraries<br /> 7312 35<sup>th</sup> Ave. NE<br /> Marysville, WA 98271-7417<br /> <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a><br /> 360-651-7050</p> <p><strong><u>Ready to Rock and Read - South Snohomish County</u></strong></p> <p><strong>Brier Library </strong></p> <p>Thursday, Oct. 6 2 p.m. Charlie Hope&rsquo;s music is full of melody, cheer and sing-able songs for the whole family.</p> <p><strong>Edmonds Library </strong></p> <p>Friday, Sept. 23 10 a.m. Come prepared to jump, dance and wiggle. Christine Roberts, founder of Nurturing Pathways will introduce children and caregivers to the joy of creative dance.</p> <p><strong>Lynnwood Library </strong></p> <p>Friday, Oct. 7 10 a.m. Come prepared to jump, dance and wiggle. Christine Roberts, founder of Nurturing Pathways will introduce children and caregivers to the joy of creative dance.</p> <p><strong>Mill Creek Library</strong></p> <p>Wednesday, Oct. 5, 7 p.m. Ray Soriano will share a variety of West African drums and instruments and lead lively rhythm activities and drum beats to participate in.</p> <p><strong>Mountlake Terrace Library </strong></p> <p>Thursday, Oct. 13 10:30 a.m. Charlie Hope&rsquo;s music is full of melody, cheer and sing-able songs for the whole family.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Mukilteo Library </strong></p> <p>Saturday, Oct. 22 10 a.m. Charlie Williams and Nancy Stewart present: The Chancy and Narly Show</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 14 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=290 Ready to Rock and Read events on Whidbey Island http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=291 <p>Dear media representative,</p> <p>Earlier this afternoon, I sent a new release regarding a Sno-Isle Libraries program called &quot;Ready to Rock and Read.&quot; The release includes a link to our online calendar, but I thought I&#39;d send along&nbsp;a list (see below)&nbsp;of program events and dates in your area. Thanks for your consideration of our news and for all&nbsp;the important work you do for our communities.</p> <p>Jim Hills<br /> Public Information Manager<br /> Sno-Isle Libraries<br /> 7312 35<sup>th</sup>&nbsp;Ave. NE<br /> Marysville, WA 98271-7417<br /> <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a><br /> 360-651-7050</p> <p><strong><u>Ready to Rock and Read &ndash; Whidbey Island</u></strong></p> <p><strong>Oak Harbor Library </strong></p> <p>Thursday, Sept. 15 10:30 a.m., Charlie Williams and Nancy Stewart present: The Chancy and Narly Show</p> <p><strong>Clinton Community Hall</strong></p> <p>Saturday, Oct. 29 1 p.m. Ray Soriano will share a variety of West African drums and instruments and lead lively rhythm activities and drum beats to participate in.</p> <p><strong>Langley Library</strong></p> <p>Wednesday, Sept. 21 10 a.m. Join Ian Dobson&rsquo;s Steel Drum Party for a rhythmical journey that uses music, dance, and movement.</p> Wed, 14 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=291 Ready to Rock and Read events in your area http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=292 <p>Dear media representative,</p> <p>Earlier this afternoon, I sent a new release regarding a Sno-Isle Libraries program called &quot;Ready to Rock and Read.&quot; The release includes a link to our online calendar, but I thought I&#39;d send along&nbsp;a list (see below)&nbsp;of program events and dates in your area. Thanks for your consideration of our news and for all&nbsp;the important work you do for our communities.</p> <p>Jim Hills<br /> Public Information Manager<br /> Sno-Isle Libraries<br /> 7312 35<sup>th</sup>&nbsp;Ave. NE<br /> Marysville, WA 98271-7417<br /> <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org" style="color: rgb(72, 94, 52); font-weight: bold; text-decoration: none;">jhills@sno-isle.org</a><br /> 360-651-7050</p> <p><strong><u>North &amp; East Snohomish County/Camano Island</u></strong></p> <p><strong>Arlington Library </strong></p> <p>Wednesday, Sept. 28, 10:30 a.m. Join Ian Dobson&rsquo;s Steel Drum Party for a rhythmical journey that uses music, dance, and movement.</p> <p><strong>Camano Island Library </strong></p> <p>Monday, Sept. 19, 10 a.m. Charlie Williams and Nancy Stewart present: The Chancy and Narly Show.</p> <p><strong>Granite Falls Library </strong></p> <p>Thursday, Oct. 6, 10 a.m., Charlie Hope&rsquo;s music is full of melody, cheer and sing-able songs for the whole family.</p> <p><strong>Lake Stevens Library </strong></p> <p>Monday, Sept. 26, 10:30 a.m. Come prepared to jump, dance and wiggle. Christine Roberts, founder of Nurturing Pathways will introduce children and caregivers to the joy of creative dance.</p> <p><strong>Snohomish Library </strong></p> <p>Saturday, Oct. 22, 2 p.m. Charlie Williams and Nancy Stewart present: The Chancy and Narly Show</p> <p><strong>Monroe Library </strong></p> <p>Thursday, Oct. 6, 10:30 a.m. Join Ian Dobson&rsquo;s Steel Drum Party for a rhythmical journey that uses music, dance, and movement</p> <p><strong>Granite Falls Library </strong></p> <p>Thursday, Oct. 6, 10 a.m., Charlie Hope&rsquo;s music is full of melody, cheer and sing-able songs for the whole family.</p> Wed, 14 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=292 Business resources take entrepreneur's 3D printing idea to next dimension http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=287 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Sam Hightower photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160907010946.jpg" style="float:left; height:333px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Samuel Hightower holds two of the containers he makes using the 3D printers at &quot;3D Buildtower,&quot; his kiosk-based business at the Everett Mall.</em></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h3>Looking for a little help?</h3> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/business/">Sno-Isle Libraries business resources</a></li> <li><a href="http://snocomakers.com/">SnoCoMAKERSPACE</a></li> <li><a href="http://snohomishscore.org/">SCORE Snohomish County</a></li> </ul> <h3>Read more</h3> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.heraldnet.com/life/kiosk-at-the-everett-mall-specializes-in-3d-printing/">Herald newspaper story from Sept. 13</a></li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Some people like to say they are &ldquo;serial entrepreneurs.&rdquo; They get an idea, create a business and then move on to the next idea.</p> <p>Samuel Hightower&rsquo;s brain is just too full of ideas to wait for one project to finish before starting another; call him a &ldquo;simultaneous entrepreneur.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;I just like doing things I&rsquo;ve never done before,&rdquo; the 27-year-old said, standing in the middle of the Everett Mall next to his kiosk, <a href="http://www.3dbuildtower.com/">&ldquo;3D Buildtower,&rdquo;</a> an on-demand, 3D-printing service which opened for business in late May. &ldquo;I always wanted to make my own business, I just wasn&rsquo;t sure what or how.&rdquo;</p> <p>That&rsquo;s when he bumped into Kassy Rodeheaver, lead librarian for business at Sno-Isle Libraries.</p> <p>&ldquo;I met Kassy at a SnoCo Makers meeting,&rdquo; Hightower said of the maker-space group headquartered on Casino Road in Everett. &ldquo;Kassy showed me the market research and databases available at Sno-Isle Libraries. It helped form my business.&rdquo;</p> <p>Rodeheaver says that visit to SnoCo Makers was a first for her, too. &ldquo;I&rsquo;d heard about them and wanted to check them out,&rdquo; said Rodeheaver, who has a focus on helping entrepreneurs.</p> <p>For Hightower, that meant showing him just what was available for free through the library.</p> <p>&ldquo;We have market research that can identify trends in an industry,&rdquo; Rodeheaver said. &ldquo;There are databases, company profiles, SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analyses and thousands of periodicals and news reports.&rdquo;</p> <p>Rodeheaver also referred Hightower to SCORE, the business mentoring service that now offers their services in four Sno-Isle Libraries community libraries.</p> <p>&ldquo;Every part of that web is important in terms of the business-support ecosystem,&rdquo; Rodeheaver said. &ldquo;And, they&rsquo;re all available to everyone.&rdquo;</p> <p>That ecosystem helped Hightower launch his business.</p> <p>&ldquo;I now have two Leapfrog printers here and a scanner with two more printers at home,&rdquo; he said. The printers use various kinds of plastic materials to print objects, anything from keyrings and business-card holders to cosplay masks and an arm.</p> <p>An arm?</p> <p>&ldquo;A clothing manufacturer came by and wanted an arm to use as a model for some clothing,&rdquo; Hightower said. &ldquo;So, I used the handheld scanner, scanned the person&rsquo;s arm and printed it in plastic, exactly the same size and shape as the real one.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hightower&rsquo;s kiosk also has a sign, &ldquo;3D artists wanted.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;My training is in graphic design and art,&rdquo; said Hightower, who came to the region from Minnesota in 2009, a two-year degree in hand. Once here, he enrolled at the Seattle Art Institute earned a Bachelor&rsquo;s in Fine Arts degree.</p> <p>&ldquo;I want to bridge the gap between technology and art. Once I found what 3D printing can do, I felt so free to create,&rdquo; he said. And he&rsquo;s trying to bring that freedom, and business, to others, too. An artist can bring their file to Hightower and he&rsquo;ll print and display it for sale in the mall.</p> <p>&ldquo;The artist gets most of the money, as they should. I keep enough for the material and small fee,&rdquo; said Hightower, who also sells the printers he uses from The Netherlands-based company.</p> <p>After doing the market research with Rodeheaver&rsquo;s help, Hightower found that his mall-based business may be just one of a kind.</p> <p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s one at Mall of America (in Minnesota), but they scan your whole body and then print you in miniature,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;My model is like a sign shop of 3D printing, which I did that, too, worked at a sign shop in Minnesota.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hightower brings all of his experiences together to make this business work, including the customer interaction: He was a member of the crew that opened the Microsoft store at University Village in Seattle.</p> <p>&ldquo;That was my first exposure to retail and I learned a lot there,&rdquo; he said, adding that just getting the job was an education. &ldquo;They had a job fair for all the finalists. There must have been 150 of us and all the other people were from Microsoft, watching us interact.&rdquo;</p> <p>It was while at the Microsoft store that Hightower says his interest in 3D printing began: &ldquo;I became the local expert on 3D.&rdquo;</p> <p>The start-a-business bug bit in 2015.</p> <p>&ldquo;I jumped off the cliff,&rdquo; Hightower said. &ldquo;I let Microsoft go in August 2015. I was doing freelance web and design work and had this 3D idea. A buddy said, &lsquo;Try the mall.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p>Hightower said he started talking to officials at Everett and Alderwood malls this past January and met Rodeheaver about the same time.</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;ve had lots of help: Kassy, Kelly Gruol at SnoCo Makers; I got the (printers) from Kelly. And, I couldn&rsquo;t do all this without the support of my grandparents,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;As you would imagine, its 24-7 running a business.&rdquo;</p> <p>Yes, 24-7, but somehow Hightower finds time for other interests.</p> <p>Hightower and his roommate are both halves of the duo, &ldquo;Wombo Buxom.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;We started playing music together and that became the group which became DJ&rsquo;ing at clubs,&rdquo; he said. According to their website, Wombo Buxom is &ldquo;an audio visual design duo &hellip; (to) produce and DJ (electronic dance music) that will send you &hellip; to a place filled with hiphop and house drenched dance music.&rdquo;</p> <p>The duo perform at The Crocodile in Seattle and other venues in the area. The two worlds do overlap a bit, he said: &ldquo;We wore the masks I printed, lit up with LED lights. It was a big hit.&rdquo;</p> <p>So what&rsquo;s next?</p> <p>&ldquo;I like the technical aspect, the business side and the creative side. And, I&rsquo;m interested in gaming,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m definitely juggling, but I have a high level of interest in creating whatever I can.&rdquo;</p> <h4>About Sno-Isle Libraries</h4> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <h4>For more information</h4> <ul> <li>Kassy Rodeheaver, Lead Librarian - Business, 360-651-7017, krodeheaver@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> Wed, 07 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=287 Snohomish Library shows off new floors and layout http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=286 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:400px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="children at library photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160906122627.jpg" style="float:left; height:600px; width:400px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Children play in the children&#39;s area at the Snohomish Library on Sept. 6, 2016.</em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The Snohomish Library doors reopened at 9 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016 after being closed since Aug. 6 for a flooring project.</p> <p>&ldquo;Customers have been coming in waves all morning,&rdquo; Managing Librarian Jude Anderson said on Sept. 6. &ldquo;People are saying they really like the new carpet and flooring.&rdquo;</p> <p>Those sentiments were echoed by customer Alicia Percival, who was there with her two children and two of their friends and liked the new look. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve been waiting for this day,&rdquo; said the Lake Stevens-area resident. &ldquo;This is our favorite library.&rdquo;</p> <p>The library was closed for a month for the project that replaced most of the flooring throughout the building. Some things got rearranged, during the closure, too.</p> <p>Some material displays and furniture were moved, based on customer patterns. The media area was expanded and there is better browsing of reference and non-fiction materials, Anderson said. There are more quiet study areas now and power outlets have been added to more carrels.</p> <p>The flooring work is part of ongoing maintenance and upgrades to the Snohomish facility in recent years. After energy efficiency upgrades in 2015, the building is using 17 percent less electricity and 70 percent less natural gas than in 2011.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Jude Anderson, managing Librarian, Snohomish Library, 360-651-4020, janderson@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Chy Ross, District Manager, Community Libraries, 360-651-7015, cross@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> Tue, 06 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=286 Snohomish Library about to open with new carpet and layout http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=285 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Workers at Snohomish Library photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160830041914.jpg" style="float:left; height:281px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><em>Workers install shelving at the Snohomish Library, getting it ready for the Sept. 6 re-opening after being closed a month for new carpeting and flooring.</em></p> <p><a href="https://youtu.be/JaDq2QIHHL4"><em>See time-lapse video of the&nbsp;project!</em></a></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <h3>Snohomish Library hours</h3> <p>Starting Sept. 6</p> <ul> <li>Mon-Thu:&nbsp;9&nbsp;a.m.-8&nbsp;p.m.</li> <li>Fri-Sat: 10&nbsp;a.m.-6&nbsp;p.m.</li> <li>Sun: 1-5&nbsp;p.m.</li> </ul> <p><em>Note: All Snohomish Library services, including the meeting room mini-library,&nbsp;will be closed Sept. 2-5.</em></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The Snohomish Library will re-open Tuesday, Sept. 6, following an extensive replacement of the flooring.</p> <p>And Managing Librarian Jude Anderson says customers should be ready to be floored, too.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ll be open and celebrating all day on Sept. 6, so come on over to the library,&rdquo; Anderson said, Tuesday, Aug. 30. &ldquo;The new carpeting looks just great, but we also took this month-long closure as an opportunity to rearrange some of our materials and services to give customers a better experience.&rdquo;</p> <p>While some of the shelving remained in place, other material displays and furniture have been moved. The adjustments are in response to the customer usage levels and patterns library staff were seeing.</p> <p>&ldquo;We have better browsing of reference and non-fiction materials,&rdquo; Anderson said. Also, media materials such as CDs, DVDs and audiobooks get new, more accessible shelving and are now grouped with the appropriate age areas.</p> <p>&ldquo;Teen audiobooks are near the teen section; children&rsquo;s music CDs are in the children&rsquo;s section,&rdquo; Anderson said.</p> <p>The library also addressed&nbsp;carrels and study areas.</p> <p>&ldquo;We added quiet study areas to supplement the space available for groups,&rdquo; Anderson said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve also added power access to study carrels for electronic devices.&rdquo;</p> <p>And, special attention was given to special collections.</p> <p>&ldquo;The international collection gets a high profile location and the classics collections is expanded to better meet high demand,&rdquo; Anderson said.</p> <p>While the library was closed, staff operated a mini-library out of the meeting room.</p> <p>&ldquo;That went very well,&rdquo; Anderson said. &ldquo;The mini-library was well-used and customers said they really appreciated the effort to keep some library services available.&rdquo;</p> <p>The flooring project that enabled all these changes went smoothly, said Brian Rush, facilities manager for Sno-Isle Libraries.</p> <p>&ldquo;The work went well and was actually ahead of schedule,&rdquo; Rush said. &ldquo;After 13 years of use in a public space, it was time to replace the carpet,&rdquo; Rush said. The staff work area also had its hard floor replaced with hard tiles that are easy to replace but also more resistant to wear.</p> <p>The flooring work is just part of ongoing maintenance and upgrades to the Snohomish facility in recent years. After energy efficiency upgrades in 2015, the building is using 17 percent less electricity and 70 percent less natural gas than in 2011.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Jude Anderson, managing Librarian, Snohomish Library, 360-651-4020, janderson@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Chy Ross, District Manager, Community Libraries, 360-651-7015, cross@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> Thu, 01 Sep 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=285 Sno-Isle Libraries, City of Lake Stevens set stage for new library and civic facilities http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=282 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:350px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160824124635.jpg" style="float:left; height:146px; width:350px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><img alt="" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160824124758.jpg" style="float:left; height:249px; width:350px" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries and the City of Lake Stevens will work together on a project that could result in a new library and civic facilities.</p> <p>In separate meetings on Aug. 22 and 23, the library district Board of Trustees and the City Council passed an interlocal agreement that calls for both entities to jointly develop a site for a new, larger library as well as civic facilities for the city.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re very pleased this interlocal agreement is in place,&rdquo; Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Lake Stevens-area residents <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/lake-stevens-capital-facilities-project">deserve a new, larger library</a>. Sno-Isle Libraries, the City of Lake Stevens and the community have been working toward this for a long time.&rdquo;</p> <p>Lake Stevens Mayor John Spencer agreed that the time has come for expanded facilities to serve residents.</p> <p>The mayor said the new site will place the library and civic facilities, including a new police station, closer to the center of the city&rsquo;s population making services more easily available.&nbsp;&ldquo;It&rsquo;s great working together to develop these library and civic facilities,&rdquo; Spencer said.</p> <p>During this past Legislative session, lawmakers included funding to help remove some current city buildings that Spencer has called &ldquo;totally inadequate.&rdquo; The city is working on a <a href="http://www.lakestevenswa.gov/index.aspx?nid=363">Downtown Lake Stevens Subarea Plan</a> focused on redeveloping city-owned property in the area and has established a citizens advisory committee for the subarea plan.</p> <p>The <a href="http://sno-isle.org/facplan">Sno-Isle Libraries 2016-25 Capital Facilities Plan</a> calls for replacing the Lake Stevens Library with a new, larger building. According to the plan&nbsp;approved this past month by the Board of Trustees, &ldquo;The Lake Stevens Library is too small to meet existing and future community needs. Public comments collected for this plan indicate strong interest in building a new library within the community.&rdquo;</p> <p>The current library building is owned by the city and the city&rsquo;s redevelopment plans preclude expanding the library at the current site.</p> <p>The city has already purchased property in the Frontier Village area for potential civic-facilities use. With the interlocal agreement now in hand, library-district officials are working to finalize the purchase of property.</p> <p>Once the library-district purchase is final, the interlocal agreement says the city and library district will work together to develop the site. A four-member committee, two from the city and two from the library district, would work out the details and supervise the process.</p> <p>Both Woolf-Ivory and Spencer said they&rsquo;re pleased with the agreement and the opportunity to bring increased service to residents.</p> <p>&ldquo;The current Lake Stevens Library is well-used and beloved, but it just isn&rsquo;t meeting the needs of this growing community,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Sno-Isle Libraries is here to serve community members and they&rsquo;ve told us they want a new library.&rdquo;</p> <p>Lake Stevens is one of the fastest growing cities in Snohomish County through annexations and an influx of families looking for affordable housing and good schools. Spencer has indicated the city will continue to grow. &ldquo;We have areas that haven&rsquo;t been annexed that we&rsquo;re looking to annex and we&rsquo;ve been growing a lot organically in the city,&rdquo; the mayor told The Daily Herald newspaper in February.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in&nbsp;Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services&nbsp;and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>About the City of Lake Stevens</strong><br /> With about 30,000&nbsp;residents, the City of Lake Stevens is dedicated to improving, and diversifying the Lake Stevens economic and business climate. Our goal is to support a lively, active city where people can live, work and play.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries&nbsp;Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Mary Swenson, Interim City Administrator, 425-377-3230, mswenson@lakestevenswa.gov</li> </ul> Wed, 24 Aug 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=282 Lake Stevens Library at back-to-school event http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=281 <p>Lake Stevens Library staff will be at a &ldquo;Back to School Fair&rdquo; scheduled for 10 a.m.-noon, Saturday, Aug. 27, at the Lake Stevens Boys &amp; Girls Club, 1609 E. Lakeshore Drive, Lake Stevens.</p> <p>&ldquo;Children&rsquo;s Librarian Monica Jackson will be there with information about the library and our programs for the coming school year,&rdquo; Managing Librarian Sonia Gustafson said. &ldquo;Lake Stevens students at Sunnyside Elementary won last year&rsquo;s Third-Grade Reading Challenge and we&rsquo;re looking forward to this coming school year.&rdquo;</p> <p>The event is sponsored by the Lake Stevens Family Center.&nbsp;</p> Mon, 22 Aug 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=281 The Oak Harbor Library Board has an opening http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=280 <p>There is an opening on the Oak Harbor Library Board.</p> <table align="left" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:128px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Susan Norman photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160811054923.jpg" style="float:left; height:179px; line-height:22.4px; width:128px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Susan Norman</em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Susan Norman, current president of the five-member board, is leaving the board on Dec. 31, 2016 due to term limits. Members the city board are appointed by the mayor with city council confirmation for a term of five years.&nbsp; Each member may serve two terms. The other current board members are Pat Morse, Marshall Goldberg, Margaret Grunwald and Anne Sullivan. Mary Anderson, Oak Harbor Senior Services Administrator, serves as city staff liaison.</p> <p>Board duties include providing advice and recommendations to the mayor and city council regarding general supervision and provision of library facilities and programs in accordance with the contract with Sno-Isle Libraries. In addition, the board members serve as liaison to share community needs, provide a forum for discussion, recommend programs, services and strategic focus, and to encourage best use of library facilities and resources.</p> <p>The board meets quarterly at 2 p.m. on the second Wednesday of January, April, July and October in the Oak Harbor Library Meeting Room, 1000 SE Regatta Drive, Oak Harbor, WA 98277</p> <p>Application and information packets are available at the library and the <a href="http://www.oakharbor.org/page.cfm?pageId=1506">City of Oak Harbor website</a>. Applicants must live in Oak Harbor in order to qualify. Applications may be submitted by email to the Oak Harbor City Clerk at <a href="mailto:athompson@oakharbor.org">athompson@oakharbor.org</a> or by mail to: City of Oak Harbor, Attn: City Clerk, 865 SE Barrington Drive, Oak Harbor, WA 98277.</p> <p>Applications must be received by 6 p.m., Sept. 30, 2016.</p> <p>For more information, contact Oak Harbor Library Managing Librarian Mary Campbell, 360-675-5115 or <a href="mailto:mcampbell@sno-isle.org">mcampbell@sno-isle.org</a>.</p> Thu, 11 Aug 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=280 Classes can help cultivate your business http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=279 <p>Whether your business is sketched on a napkin or already pulling in customers, Sno-Isle Libraries has classes that can help take it to the next level.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:400px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=7&amp;ln=10&amp;ln=3&amp;ln=11&amp;ln=13&amp;ln=15&amp;ln=17&amp;ln=4&amp;ln=2&amp;ln=19&amp;ln=8"><img alt="Business classes graphic" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160810103322.jpg" style="float:left; height:117px; width:400px" /></a></td> </tr> <tr> <td><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventsignup.asp?ID=79198&amp;rts=&amp;disptype=&amp;ret=eventcalendar.asp&amp;pointer=&amp;returnToSearch=&amp;num=0&amp;ad=&amp;dt=mo&amp;mo=9/1/2016&amp;df=calendar&amp;EventType=Business&amp;Lib=11&amp;AgeGroup=ALL&amp;LangType=0&amp;WindowMode=&amp;noheader=&amp;lad=&amp;pub=1&amp;nopub=&amp;page=&amp;pgdisp="><img alt="Business class poster" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160810103433.jpg" style="float:left; height:518px; width:400px" /></a></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>The first in a series of 40 business-related classes at Sno-Isle Libraries is Saturday morning, Aug. 13, at the Lynnwood Library.&nbsp;<a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=7&amp;ln=10&amp;ln=3&amp;ln=11&amp;ln=13&amp;ln=15&amp;ln=17&amp;ln=4&amp;ln=2&amp;ln=19&amp;ln=8">See the full calendar of classes</a>&nbsp;</em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re committed to helping start and grow businesses,&rdquo; said&nbsp;Lead Librarian for Business&nbsp;Kassy Rodeheaver. Rodeheaver and community-library staff members have lined up 40 classes that start&nbsp;Aug.&nbsp;13 and run&nbsp;through December at 11 libraries.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve got everything from &lsquo;Steps to Starting a New Business&rsquo; to more advanced subjects such as &lsquo;SEO and Getting Your Business to Rank on Google,&rsquo;&rdquo; Rodeheaver said. &ldquo;And, lots more in-between.&rdquo;</p> <p>Teaching the classes are 10 local and regional experts in a variety of business-support areas. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m excited about the expertise of our presenters,&rdquo; Rodeheaver said, adding that many have advanced business degrees and years of experience managing their own businesses.&nbsp;</p> <p>The list includes <a href="http://snohomishscore.org/">Jack Stiegler</a>, who heads the Snohomish County branch of SCORE; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/mayasullivanauthor">Maya Sullivan</a>, author of &ldquo;Dare to Be Your Own Boss;&rdquo; and <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/jean-sagvold-simpson-2818891">Jean Simpson</a>, of GROWashington and the Girandola Academy. Also, two presenters from the 2015 <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/tedx">SnoIsleLibrariesTEDx</a>, <a href="http://www.annarohrbough.com/">Anna Rohrbough</a> and <a href="http://superchargemarketing.com/">Matt Cail</a>, will teach classes this fall.</p> <p>Other presenters include <a href="http://bhale.esourcecoach.com/">Bob Hale</a>, a franchising coach; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/jane-wines-23363b25">Jane Wines</a>, a senior benefits adviser with the&nbsp;U. S. Department of Labor&rsquo;s Employee Benefits Security Administration; <a href="http://www.improv-ableresults.com/about.asp">Sandy Bjorgen</a>, a presentation and speaking coach; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/robinackerbush">Robin Bush</a>, on organizational structures, and <a href="http://www.blockbeta.com/">Robbin&nbsp; Block</a>, on creative marketing strategies.</p> <p>The classes are scheduled at 11 libraries in five areas, including:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=11&amp;ln=13&amp;ln=15"><strong>South</strong></a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=11">Lynnwood</a>, <a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=13">Mill Creek</a> and <a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=15">Mountlake Terrace</a></li> </ul> </li> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=8"><strong>East</strong></a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=8">Granite Falls</a></li> </ul> </li> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=19&amp;ln=2"><strong>North</strong></a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=19">Stanwood</a> and <a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=2">Camano Island</a></li> </ul> </li> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=17&amp;ln=4"><strong>North Whidbey</strong></a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=17&amp;ln=4">Oak Harbor</a> and <a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=4">Coupeville</a></li> </ul> </li> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=7&amp;ln=10&amp;ln=3"><strong>South Whidbey</strong></a> <ul style="list-style-type:circle"> <li><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=3">Clinton</a>, <a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=10">Langley</a> and <a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=7">Freeland</a></li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>Registration for these classes is required and available through the <a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?et=business&amp;ln=7&amp;ln=10&amp;ln=3&amp;ln=11&amp;ln=13&amp;ln=15&amp;ln=17&amp;ln=4&amp;ln=2&amp;ln=19&amp;ln=8">class listings in the online calendar.</a></p> <p>&ldquo;Some areas have more or fewer classes based on the classes each library chose to host,&rdquo; Rodeheaver said. &ldquo;However, anyone can attend any of the sessions. They are all free and open to the public.&rdquo;</p> <p>So why does Sno-Isle Libraries offer business classes? It&rsquo;s a question Rodeheaver says she often hears.</p> <p>&ldquo;This region ranks near the top in the U.S. for <a href="http://www.geekwire.com/2015/the-top-20-startup-ecosystems-in-the-world-new-report-ranks-seattle-no-8/">entrepreneurship and business startups</a>. Our strategic focus says &lsquo;We will build economically sound communities (through) entrepreneur and small-business support,&rsquo;&rdquo; Rodeheaver said. &ldquo;Library customers can access amazing market research databases and other resources related to business as a part of our regular services. These business-focused programs are an extension of our service.&rdquo;</p> <p>Rodeheaver added that these classes are just some of the ongoing business-support programs at Sno-Isle Libraries. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve got programs going on all the time in our libraries and we&rsquo;re adding new resources and new offerings; just check for the latest at our website, <a href="http://sno-isle.org/business/">sno-isle.org/business</a>.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745&nbsp;residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Kassy Rodeheaver, Lead Librarian for Business, 360-651-717, <a href="mailto:KRodeheaver@sno-isle.org">KRodeheaver@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 10 Aug 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=279 Music series coming to Edmonds Library http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=278 <p><img alt="library and art logos" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160809115911.jpg" style="float:right; height:375px; margin:5px; width:350px" /></p> <p>A new music series is coming to the Edmonds Library in partnership with the City of Edmonds Arts Commission.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re excited to bring entertaining and informative musical performances to the library,&rdquo; said Edmonds Library Managing Librarian Richard Suico. The series will be in the Plaza Room above the library. Three of the scheduled five events will coincide with Art Walk Edmonds on the third Thursday of the month.</p> <ul> <li>On Thursday, Oct. 20 at 6:30 p.m., world flute artist and storyteller Gary Stroutsos will present a tribute to the tradition of song and story in the Zuni, Navajo and Salish cultures. The event will include a showing of &quot;Remembering the Songs,&quot;&nbsp;- a 30-minute film offering a glimpse of the music-makers of the Din&eacute;, Zuni, and Salish communities. Stroutsos will play his traditional American Indian made flutes and answer questions following the presentation.</li> <li>On Thursday, Nov. 17 at 6:30 p.m., The Hot Club of Troy will present a musical performance and education about the jazz and life of the Belgian-born French jazz guitar genius Django Reinhardt. The Langley-based Hot Club of Troy features Troy Chapman, guitar; Keith Bowers, guitar,&nbsp;and Kristi O&#39;Donnell, bass.</li> <li>On Thursday, Jan. 19 at 6:30 p.m., Bryan Stratton will guide listeners through the lives and music of Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, the Beatles and other influential singer-songwriters of the &rsquo;60s. Library regulars may recognize Stratton, a Sno-Isle Libraries staff member, who uses his music-education degree to perform and inform at many libraries and other venues in the area.</li> <li>On Saturday, Feb. 4 at 2 p.m., the DownTown Mountain Boys will preview <a href="http://wintergrass.com/">Wintergrass 2017</a> with a 45-minute performance. After performing, the band will stay for a jam session and audience members are encouraged bring an instrument to join in or just stay and listen. The DownTown Mountain Boys include Paul Elliott, violin; Don Share, guitar, lead and harmony vocals; Dave Keenan, banjo, lead and harmony vocals; Terry Enyeart, bass, lead and harmony vocals; and Tom Moran, mandolin.</li> </ul> <p>Suico said the March, 2017, event is still in the planning stages.</p> <p>The City of Edmonds Arts Commission and the library are collaborating on the series, based on the intersecting values that build on and foster the power of community and cultural experiences. &ldquo;The City of Edmonds Arts Commission is excited to be a partner with the library on this program,&rdquo; said Frances Chapin, Edmonds Arts &amp; Culture Manager.</p> <p>&ldquo;Over the years, Sno-Isle Libraries has developed relationships with many local performers. We&rsquo;re so happy to be able to bring some of our friends to Edmonds for this series,&rdquo; Suico said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re also thankful to the Friends of Edmonds Library. They gladly fund many of these events and we appreciate seeing their hard volunteer work expressed&nbsp;in high quality programs for community.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Richard Suico, Managing Llibrarian Edmonds Llibrary, 425-771-1933, rsuico@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Frances White Chapin, Edmonds Arts &amp; Culture Manager, 425-771-228, frances.chapin@edmondswa.gov</li> <li>Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> Tue, 09 Aug 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=278 Project floors Snohomish Library in August http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=277 <p><img alt="library customers photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160808025044.jpg" style="float:left; height:529px; width:850px" /></p> <p><em>Snohomish Library customers use the &quot;mini-library&quot; that is&nbsp;open&nbsp;Aug. 8-31 while flooring is replaced in the main library. The&nbsp;full&nbsp;library will re-open Sept. 6. <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskFUG1EU">Photo gallery</a></em></p> <p>The main area of the Snohomish Library building will be closed through Sept. 5 for a carpeting and flooring project.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:350px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Terminator flooring machine photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160808013453.jpg" style="float:left; height:294px; width:350px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td>A worker operates the &quot;Terminator,&quot; a machine that removes old flooring, as part of the work at the Snohomish Library.</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>During the closure, a &ldquo;mini-library&rdquo; is open in the building&rsquo;s meeting room from 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Mondays-Saturdays and 1-5 p.m. on Sundays. Available services include picking up materials on hold, returning materials, checkout materials, wi-fi, accepting Explore Summer logs and handing out prizes. No public computers and no public restrooms will be available during the project.</p> <p>The full&nbsp;library will re-open&nbsp;on Sept. 6.</p> <p>&ldquo;This is a standard replacement and update cycle of carpeting for us. After 13 years of use in a public space we would expect to be replacing the carpet,&rdquo; said Brian Rush, facilities manager for Sno-Isle Libraries. Most of the carpet and flooring in the 23,000-square-foot library is original to when it was built in 2003.</p> <p>Flooring in the public areas of the library were a combination of carpet tiles and rolled carpet. The new material will be all carpet tiles to make it easier to replace damaged or worn areas. The staff work area was a hard flooring material that had been put down in one piece. Rush said the replacement material will also be tiles and much more resistant to wear.</p> <p>The flooring work is just part of ongoing maintenance and upgrades to the Snohomish facility in recent years. After energy efficiency upgrades in 2015, the building is using 17 percent less electricity and 70 percent less natural gas than in 2011.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Jude Anderson, managing Librarian, Snohomish Library, 360-651-4020, <a href="mailto:janderson@sno-isle.org">janderson@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Chy Ross, District Manager, Community Libraries, 360-651-7015, <a href="mailto:cross@sno-isle.org">cross@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Mon, 08 Aug 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=277 Volunteers helping libraries and cities http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=276 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:400px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Painting the Stanwood Library" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160805041150.jpg" style="float:left; height:600px; width:400px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Sheri Lieurance, a Grove Church member from Camano Island, braces the roller handle against her head to reach the top of the wall with a new coat of paint for the Stanwood Library, Aug. 4, 2016. <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskFQUuit">Photo gallery</a></em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Fresh paint is going on at the Stanwood and Arlington libraries, courtesy of members of The Grove Church in Marysville and volunteer programs in both cities.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re just excited&nbsp;for the help in getting the library painted,&rdquo; Stanwood Managing Librarian Charles Pratt said. &ldquo;The city owns the building and they arranged to provide the materials with the church members volunteering the labor.&rdquo;</p> <p>At the Arlington Library, Managing Librarian Kathy Bullene said the work includes new paint in both restrooms as well as general cleanup of the landscaping around the library.</p> <p>The volunteer effort has been going on for about five years, said Duane Palmer, a Stanwood-area resident and church member who was overseeing the crew at the Stanwood Library on Thursday, Aug. 4.</p> <p>&ldquo;Overall, there are about 300 members working in crews out doing projects,&rdquo; Palmer said on Thursday, Aug. 4. &ldquo;We have 10 people here today. We started on Tuesday and we&rsquo;ll be finished Friday.&rdquo;</p> <p>Palmer said other community projects include painting restrooms at the Arlington Library as well as non-library projects in Lake Stevens, Marysville, Everett and Tulalip. Previous-year projects in the Stanwood area include painting the Triangle Bridge and at Church Creek Park, he said.</p> <p>Longtime Stanwood Library staff member Almira Jones said this is the first time in her memory that the library hasn&rsquo;t been painted white, but the change seems to be just fine with customers. &ldquo;People are saying they like the new color,&rdquo; Jones said. &ldquo;And, it matches with the neighboring buildings.&rdquo;</p> Fri, 05 Aug 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=276 Lynnwood Library listed among new 10-year plan for library buildings http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=271 <p>A new library in Lynnwood could be one of as many as seven new facilities in the Sno-Isle Libraries system over the coming decade, according to a plan unanimously approved by the library district&rsquo;s Board of Trustees at the regularly scheduled July 25, 2016, meeting.</p> <p>&ldquo;We call it the &lsquo;Capital Facilities Plan,&rsquo; but really it&rsquo;s more of a statement of library building needs across the region,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;This plan responds to the services our customers are requesting and the growth in the communities we serve.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan puts facilities in four broad categories: maintain, renovate, replace and areas of opportunity.</p> <p>A potential new Lynnwood Library is listed as an area of opportunity category.</p> <p>&ldquo;While the existing library meets today&rsquo;s needs, tomorrow is a different story,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>More than 1,000 multi-family housing units are under construction or permitted in and around Lynnwood&rsquo;s core. City officials are also moving forward with the City Center Project, which envisions a new library as part a new civic center. In addition, Lynnwood is already a regional transit hub and Link Light Rail is expected to open in 2023.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to be prepared to support the city&rsquo;s vision for itself,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Other areas of opportunity include a new library in the greater Mill Creek area and two library demonstration projects, one in the 128<sup>th</sup> Street/ Mariner High School area and the other in the Lakewood/Smokey Point area.</p> <p>&nbsp;&ldquo;The common theme of these projects is addressing unserved or underserved community needs, as well as population growth,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>According to the plan, the current Mill Creek Library is too small to adequately serve the existing customer base. That library is slated for renovation because site restrictions may preclude an expanded facility. However, significant population growth is projected in the areas east and south of the current Mill Creek Library. Strong community feedback from area residents indicate they want the existing Mill Creek Library to remain at its current location in addition to a new library in the area, according to the plan.</p> <p>As for the 128th Street/Mariner demonstration project, Woolf-Ivory said, &ldquo;There are 30,000 people living in this island of unincorporated Snohomish County surrounded by Mukilteo, Everett, Mill Creek and Lynnwood. The tremendous library needs in the Mariner area were becoming apparent a decade ago, but the economic downturn put things on&nbsp;hold.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Lakewood/Smokey Point area, identified for a second demonstration project, has significant growth now with more expected by 2025, according to the plan.</p> <p>Demonstration projects could mean a library using leased space, staffed with existing Sno-Isle Libraries employees and stocked with existing materials and the normal collection-addition processes. &ldquo;The Camano Library (which opened in 2015), started as a demonstration project,&rdquo; said Woolf-Ivory, adding that 128<sup>th</sup> Street Mariner could be up and running in the first quarter of this coming year with Lakewood Smokey point in the fourth quarter.</p> <p>Most of the existing 21 libraries, and the administrative service center in Marysville, fall into the &ldquo;maintain&rdquo; category. These facilities are anticipated to meet current and projected needs with regular and ongoing maintenance, according to the plan.</p> <p>One facility, the Mill Creek Library, is identified for renovation. Built in 1987 and expanded in 1992, the plan acknowledges that the library &ldquo;is significantly undersized&rdquo; for the community. However, further expansion at the current site may not be possible so the plan recommends renovating the building to maximize its service to the community.</p> <p>The plan also calls out library buildings in Arlington, Lake Stevens and Stanwood as too small to meet current needs, let alone existing and anticipated growth in those areas.</p> <p>&ldquo;These communities told us they want new libraries and we&rsquo;re working with them to determine the best way forward &ldquo;,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;There are reasons for each of these facilities to be replaced.&rdquo;</p> <p>While the plan lays out the needs, it doesn&rsquo;t include a timeline for the projects or the costs.</p> <p>&ldquo;Each of these projects is as unique as the community it serves now or will serve,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The timeline for each project will be a collaborative effort and influenced by each community&#39;s sense of urgency for an improved library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That said, some projects on the list that are likely to move ahead more quickly than others.</p> <p>&ldquo;Lake Stevens&rsquo; efforts for a new library 10 years ago were frustrated by the economic downturn,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Voter-approval for funding will be required to match the community&rsquo;s urgency for a larger library. &ldquo;The soonest that could happen is Feb. 14, 2017,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>&nbsp;&ldquo;This document reflects what we heard from our communities and customers,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We asked questions and listened. Residents told us they love their libraries and want more space to read, to study and to gather as a community.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for costs, that, too, is determined through the collaborative process with each community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Size, location, new building or existing building, level of philanthropic support; there are many variables that can affect project cost,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Library facilities are generally funded by capital bonds, which must be approved by voters in a designated Library Capital Facilities Area. &ldquo;In the end, it is a decision by the community, not by Sno-Isle Libraries.&rdquo;</p> <p>Work on the plan began mid-2015 when the library district commissioned a study to look at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/12675/12675_20160420023603.pdf">the future of libraries</a>. &ldquo;We could see our own data, but we wanted to check our trends against a national perspective,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Findings from that study, released in September, 2015, confirmed what Sno-Isle Libraries officials were seeing, that libraries are becoming places to meet, study, attend programs and use technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;More people are coming to the community libraries and they are coming for more than checking out a book,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. While numbers vary from library to library, data comparing the first quarter of 2015 and 2016 show an average 12 percent increase in people going to libraries across the district.</p> <p>This past fall, an initial phase of public meetings, an online survey and interviews with community leaders began with the help of the Seattle-based consulting firm, <a href="http://enviroissues.com/" target="_blank">EnviroIssues</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;We knew that some of the community libraries are undersized for their communities; the Lake Stevens Library is a prime example,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;But we work closely with our communities to provide the library and services that they want. We needed to go listen to our customers and the communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>That community input became part of a draft plan that was released this past May. &ldquo;Then, we took the draft plan back out to the communities to check our work,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the second phase of public review. An online survey and face-to-face presentations to community groups by her and other library officials helped fine-tune the plan.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was very helpful and we did make some changes,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;For example, the draft plan identified the Arlington Library for renovation. The community told us they wanted more, that they want a new building, and that&rsquo;s reflected in the plan approved by our trustees.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>SIDEBAR</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 728,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=271 Mill Creek Library listed among new 10-year plan for library buildings http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=272 <p>Mill Creek-area residents could be getting a renovated library and another brand-new facility according to a plan unanimously approved by Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees at the regularly scheduled July 25, 2016, meeting.</p> <p>&ldquo;We call it the &lsquo;Capital Facilities Plan,&rsquo; but really it&rsquo;s more of a statement of capital facilities needs across the district,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;This plan responds to the services our customers are requesting and the growth in the communities we serve.&rdquo;</p> <p>According to the plan, there could be as many as seven new facilities across the Sno-Isle Libraries system over the coming decade. The plan puts facilities in four broad categories: maintain, renovate, replace and areas of opportunity.</p> <p>Most of the existing 21 libraries, and the administrative service center in Marysville, fall into the &ldquo;maintain&rdquo; category. These facilities are anticipated to meet current and projected needs with regular and ongoing maintenance, according to the plan.</p> <p>The Mill Creek Library, is identified for renovation. Built in 1987 and expanded in 1992, the plan acknowledges that the library &ldquo;is significantly undersized&rdquo; for the community. However, further expansion at the current site may not be possible so the plan recommends renovating the building to maximize its service to the community.</p> <p>The plan also calls out library buildings in Arlington, Lake Stevens and Stanwood as too small to meet current needs, let alone existing and anticipated growth in those areas.</p> <p>&ldquo;These communities told us they want new libraries and we&rsquo;re working with them to determine the best way forward,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;There are reasons for each of these facilities to be replaced.&rdquo;</p> <p>The &ldquo;Greater Mill Creek Area&rdquo; appears in the plan&rsquo;s &ldquo;Areas of Opportunity&rdquo; category.</p> <p>&ldquo;The common theme of these projects is addressing unserved or underserved community needs, as well as population growth,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>According to the plan, &ldquo;The current (Mill Creek Library) is too small to adequately serve the existing customer base and significant population growth is projected in the areas east and south of the current Mill Creek Library.&rdquo; Strong community feedback from area residents indicate they want the existing Mill Creek Library to remain at its current location in addition to a new library in the area.</p> <p>Also listed as areas of opportunity are two &ldquo;library demonstration projects,&rdquo; one in the 128<sup>th</sup> Street/Mariner High School area and a second in the Lakewood/Smokey Point area. Such projects could mean a library using leased space, staffed with existing Sno-Isle Libraries employees and stocked with existing materials and the normal collection-addition processes.</p> <p>&ldquo;There are 30,000 people living in this island of unincorporated Snohomish County surrounded by Mukilteo, Everett, Mill Creek and Lynnwood,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the area south of the Everett city limits which includes Mariner High School. &ldquo;The tremendous library needs in the Mariner area were becoming apparent a decade ago, but the economic downturn put things on&nbsp;hold.&rdquo;</p> <p>Woolf-Ivory says a location in the 128<sup>th</sup> Street/Mariner area could be up and running in the first quarter of this coming year.</p> <p>A second demonstration project is slated for the Lakewood/Smokey Point area, where significant growth is occurring now with more expected by 2025. &ldquo;The Camano Library (which opened in 2015), started as a demonstration project,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Using the demonstration-project model, I&rsquo;m hoping we can provide increased services to Lakewood/Smokey Point by the fourth quarter of 2017.&rdquo;</p> <p>Also in the areas-of-opportunity category is the Lynnwood Library. &ldquo;While the existing library meets today&rsquo;s needs, tomorrow is a different story,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>More than 1,000 multi-family housing units are under construction or permitted in and around Lynnwood&rsquo;s core. City officials are also moving forward with the City Center Project, which envisions a new library as part a new civic center. In addition, Lynnwood is already a regional transit hub and Link Light Rail is expected to open in 2023.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to be prepared to support the city&rsquo;s vision for itself,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>While the plan lays out the needs, it doesn&rsquo;t include a timeline for the projects or the costs.</p> <p>&ldquo;Each of these projects is as unique as the community it serves now or will serve,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The timeline for each project will be a collaborative effort and influenced by each community&#39;s sense of urgency for an improved library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That said, some projects on the list that are likely to move ahead more quickly than others.</p> <p>&ldquo;Lake Stevens&rsquo; efforts for a new library 10 years ago were frustrated by the economic downturn,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Voter-approval for funding will be required to match the community&rsquo;s urgency for a larger library. &ldquo;The soonest that could happen is Feb. 14, 2017,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Also on a potentially faster track are the library demonstration projects at 128<sup>th</sup> Street/Mariner and Lakewood/Smokey Point. Because they will get started with the library district&rsquo;s existing budget and won&rsquo;t require voter approval, both projects could up and running in 2017.</p> <p>&ldquo;This document reflects what we heard from our communities and customers,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We asked questions and listened. Residents told us they love their libraries and want more space to read, to study and to gather as a community.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for costs, that too, is determined through the collaborative process with each community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Size, location, new building or existing building, level of philanthropic support; there are many variables that can affect project cost,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Library facilities are generally funded by capital bonds, which must be approved by voters in a designated Library Capital Facilities Area. &ldquo;In the end, it is a decision by the community, not by Sno-Isle Libraries.&rdquo;</p> <p>Work on the plan began mid-2015 when the library district commissioned a study to look at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/12675/12675_20160420023603.pdf">the future of libraries</a>. &ldquo;We could see our own data, but we wanted to check our trends against a national perspective,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Findings from that study, released in September, 2015, confirmed what Sno-Isle Libraries officials were seeing, that libraries are becoming places to meet, study, attend programs and use technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;More people are coming to the community libraries and they are coming for more than checking out a book,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. While numbers vary from library to library, data comparing the first quarter of 2015 and 2016 show an average 12 percent increase in people going to libraries across the district.</p> <p>This past fall, an initial phase of public meetings, an online survey and interviews with community leaders began with the help of the Seattle-based consulting firm, <a href="http://enviroissues.com/" target="_blank">EnviroIssues</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;We knew that some of the community libraries are undersized for their communities; the Lake Stevens Library is a prime example,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;But we work closely with our communities to provide the library and services that they want. We needed to go listen to our customers and the communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>That community input became part of a draft plan that was released this past May. &ldquo;Then, we took the draft plan back out to the communities to check our work,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the second phase of public review. An online survey and face-to-face presentations to community groups by her and other library officials helped fine-tune the plan.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was very helpful and we did make some changes,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;For example, the draft plan identified the Arlington Library for renovation. The community told us they wanted more, that they want a new building, and that&rsquo;s reflected in the plan approved by our trustees.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>SIDEBAR</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 728,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=272 Lake Stevens Library listed among new 10-year plan for library buildings http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=270 <p>A new Lake Stevens Library could be one of as many as seven new facilities in the Sno-Isle Libraries system over the coming decade, according to a plan unanimously approved by the library district&rsquo;s Board of Trustees at the regularly scheduled July 25, 2016, meeting.</p> <p>&ldquo;We call it the &lsquo;Capital Facilities Plan,&rsquo; but really it&rsquo;s more of a statement of library building needs across the region,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;This plan responds to the services our customers are requesting and the growth in the communities we serve.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Lake Stevens Library is one of three, along with Arlington and Stanwood, called out in the plan as too small to meet current needs, let alone existing and anticipated growth in those areas.</p> <p>The current Lake Stevens Library can&rsquo;t support requested community events and library programs. In an attempt to accommodate some events and programs, library staff are forced to book space in other public facilities.</p> <p>The area&rsquo;s population is expected to approach 50,000 people by 2025, according to forecasts. The fastest growing areas are projected to be on the west side of the lake. While public comments indicate a strong interest in a new, larger library, expanding at the current location is not possible.</p> <p>&ldquo;These communities told us they want new libraries and we&rsquo;re working with them to determine the best way forward,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>The plan puts all library-district facilities in four broad categories: maintain, renovate, replace and areas of opportunity.</p> <p>Most of the existing 21 libraries, and the administrative service center in Marysville, fall into the &ldquo;maintain&rdquo; category. These facilities are anticipated to meet current and projected needs with regular and ongoing maintenance, according to the plan.</p> <p>One facility, the Mill Creek Library, is identified for renovation. Built in 1987 and expanded in 1992, the plan acknowledges that the library &ldquo;is significantly undersized&rdquo; for the community. However, further expansion at the current site may not be possible so the plan recommends renovating the building to maximize its service to the community.</p> <p>The replace category includes Lake Stevens, Arlington and Stanwood.</p> <p>The plan also has &ldquo;Areas of Opportunity&rdquo; category, which includes an interesting mix of projects.</p> <p>&ldquo;The common theme of these projects is addressing unserved or underserved community needs, as well as population growth,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Topping the list is an area identified in the plan as &ldquo;128th Street/Mariner.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;There are 30,000 people living in this island of unincorporated Snohomish County surrounded by Mukilteo, Everett, Mill Creek and Lynnwood,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the area south of the Everett city limits which includes Mariner High School. &ldquo;The tremendous library needs in the Mariner area were becoming apparent a decade ago, but the economic downturn put things on&nbsp;hold.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan calls for a &ldquo;library demonstration project&rdquo; for the area and Woolf-Ivory says it could be up and running in the first quarter of this coming year. Such a project could mean a library using leased space, staffed with existing Sno-Isle Libraries employees and stocked with existing materials and the normal collection-addition processes.</p> <p>The plan calls for a second demonstration project in the Lakewood/Smokey Point area, where significant growth is occurring now with more expected by 2025, according to the plan. &ldquo;The Camano Library (which opened in 2015), started as a demonstration project,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Using the demonstration-project model, I&rsquo;m hoping we can provide increased services to Lakewood/Smokey Point by the fourth quarter of 2017.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan identifies a new library for what is termed the greater Mill Creek area.</p> <p>According to the plan, &ldquo;The current (Mill Creek Library) is too small to adequately serve the existing customer base and significant population growth is projected in the areas east and south of the current Mill Creek Library.&rdquo; Strong community feedback from area residents indicate they want the existing Mill Creek Library to remain at its current location in addition to a new library in the area.</p> <p>Also in the areas-of-opportunity category is the Lynnwood Library. &ldquo;While the existing library meets today&rsquo;s needs, tomorrow is a different story,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>More than 1,000 multi-family housing units are under construction or permitted in and around Lynnwood&rsquo;s core. City officials are also moving forward with the City Center Project, which envisions a new library as part a new civic center. In addition, Lynnwood is already a regional transit hub and Link Light Rail is expected to open in 2023.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to be prepared to support the city&rsquo;s vision for itself,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>While the plan lays out the needs, it doesn&rsquo;t include a timeline for the projects or the costs.</p> <p>&ldquo;Each of these projects is as unique as the community it serves now or will serve,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The timeline for each project will be a collaborative effort and influenced by each community&#39;s sense of urgency for an improved library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That said, some projects on the list that are likely to move ahead more quickly than others.</p> <p>&ldquo;Lake Stevens&rsquo; efforts for a new library 10 years ago were frustrated by the economic downturn,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Voter-approval for funding will be required to match the community&rsquo;s urgency for a larger library. &ldquo;The soonest that could happen is Feb. 14, 2017,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Also on a potentially faster track are the library demonstration projects at 128<sup>th</sup> Street/Mariner and Lakewood/Smokey Point. Because they will get started with the library district&rsquo;s existing budget and won&rsquo;t require voter approval, both projects could up and running in 2017.</p> <p>&ldquo;This document reflects what we heard from our communities and customers,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We asked questions and listened. Residents told us they love their libraries and want more space to read, to study and to gather as a community.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for costs, that, too, is determined through the collaborative process with each community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Size, location, new building or existing building, level of philanthropic support; there are many variables that can affect project cost,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Library facilities are generally funded by capital bonds, which must be approved by voters in a designated Library Capital Facilities Area. &ldquo;In the end, it is a decision by the community, not by Sno-Isle Libraries.&rdquo;</p> <p>Work on the plan began mid-2015 when the library district commissioned a study to look at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/12675/12675_20160420023603.pdf">the future of libraries</a>. &ldquo;We could see our own data, but we wanted to check our trends against a national perspective,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Findings from that study, released in September, 2015, confirmed what Sno-Isle Libraries officials were seeing, that libraries are becoming places to meet, study, attend programs and use technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;More people are coming to the community libraries and they are coming for more than checking out a book,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. While numbers vary from library to library, data comparing the first quarter of 2015 and 2016 show an average 12 percent increase in people going to libraries across the district.</p> <p>This past fall, an initial phase of public meetings, an online survey and interviews with community leaders began with the help of the Seattle-based consulting firm, <a href="http://enviroissues.com/" target="_blank">EnviroIssues</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;We knew that some of the community libraries are undersized for their communities; the Lake Stevens Library is a prime example,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;But we work closely with our communities to provide the library and services that they want. We needed to go listen to our customers and the communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>That community input became part of a draft plan that was released this past May. &ldquo;Then, we took the draft plan back out to the communities to check our work,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the second phase of public review. An online survey and face-to-face presentations to community groups by her and other library officials helped fine-tune the plan.</p> <p><strong>SIDEBAR</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 728,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=270 New 10-Year Plan for Library Buildings http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=268 <p>A new Lake Stevens Library could be one of as many as seven new facilities in the Sno-Isle Libraries system over the coming decade, according to a plan unanimously approved by the library district&rsquo;s Board of Trustees at the regularly scheduled July 25, 2016 meeting.</p> <p>&ldquo;We call it the &lsquo;Capital facilities Plan,&rsquo; but really it&rsquo;s more of a statement of library building needs across the region,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;This plan responds to the services our customers are requesting and the growth in the communities we serve.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Lake Stevens Library is one of three, along with Arlington and Stanwood, called out in the plan as too small to meet current needs, let alone existing and anticipated growth in those areas.</p> <p>The current Lake Stevens Library can&rsquo;t support requested community events and library programs. In an attempt to accommodate some events and programs, forcing library staff to book space in other public facilities.</p> <p>The area&rsquo;s population is expected to approach 50,000 people by 2025, according to forecasts. The fastest growing areas are projected to be on the west side of the lake. While public comments indicate a strong interest in a new, larger library, expanding at the current location is not possible</p> <p>&ldquo;These communities told us they want new libraries and we&rsquo;re working with them to determine the best way forward,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>The plan puts all library-district facilities in four broad categories: maintain, renovate, replace and areas of opportunity.</p> <p>Most of the existing 21 libraries, and the administrative service center in Marysville, fall into the &ldquo;maintain&rdquo; category. These facilities are anticipated to meet current and projected needs with regular and ongoing maintenance, according to the plan.</p> <p>One facility, the Mill Creek Library, is identified for renovation. Built in 1987 and expanded in 1992, the plan acknowledges that the library &ldquo;is significantly undersized&rdquo; for the community. However, further expansion at the current site may not be possible so the plan recommends renovating the building to maximize its service to the community.</p> <p>The replace category includes Lake Stevens, Arlington and Stanwood.</p> <p>The plan also has &ldquo;Areas of Opportunity&rdquo; category, which includes an interesting mix of projects.</p> <p>&ldquo;The common theme of these projects is addressing unserved or underserved community needs, as well as population growth,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Topping the list is an area identified in the plan as &ldquo;128th Street/Mariner.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;There are 30,000 people living in this island of unincorporated Snohomish County surrounded by Mukilteo, Everett, Mill Creek and Lynnwood,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the area south of the Everett city limits which includes Mariner High School. &ldquo;The tremendous library needs in the Mariner area were becoming apparent a decade ago, but the economic downturn&nbsp;put things on&nbsp; hold.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan calls for a &ldquo;library demonstration project&rdquo; for the area and Woolf-Ivory says it could be up and running in the first quarter of this coming year. Such a project could mean a library using leased space, staffed with existing Sno-Isle Libraries employees and stocked with existing materials and the normal collection-addition processes.</p> <p>The plan calls for a second demonstration project in the Lakewood/Smokey Point area, where significant growth is occurring now with more expected by 2025, according to the plan. &ldquo;The Camano Library (which opened in 2015), started as a demonstration project,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Using the demonstration-project model, I&rsquo;m hoping we can provide increased services to Lakewood/Smokey Point by the fourth quarter of 2017.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan identifies a new library for what is termed the greater Mill Creek area.</p> <p>According to the plan, &ldquo;The current (Mill Creek Library) is too small to adequately serve the existing customer base and significant population growth is projected in the areas east and south of the current Mill Creek Library.&rdquo; Strong community feedback from area residents indicate they want the existing Mill Creek Library to remain at its current location in addition to a new library in the area.</p> <p>Also in the areas-of-opportunity category is the Lynnwood Library. &ldquo;While the existing library meets today&rsquo;s needs, tomorrow is a different story,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>More than 1,000 multi-family housing units are under construction or permitted in and around Lynnwood&rsquo;s core. City officials are also moving forward with the City Center Project, which envisions a new library as part a new civic center. In addition, Lynnwood is already a regional transit hub and Link Light Rail is expected to open in 2023.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to be prepared to support the city&rsquo;s vision for itself,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>While the plan lays out the needs, it doesn&rsquo;t include a timeline for the projects or the costs.</p> <p>&ldquo;Each of these projects is as unique as the community it serves now or will serve,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The timeline for each project will be a collaborative effort and influenced by each community&#39;s sense of urgency for an improved library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That said, some projects on the list that are likely to move ahead more quickly than others.</p> <p>&ldquo;Lake Stevens deserves a new library. We were so close when the economy nosedived,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Still, while there is considerable support for a new, larger library, Lake Stevens-area voters must approve the funding. &ldquo;The soonest that could happen is Feb. 14, 2017,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Also on a potentially faster track are the library demonstration projects at 128<sup>th</sup> Street/Mariner and Lakewood/Smokey Point. Because they will get started with the library district&rsquo;s existing budget and won&rsquo;t require voter approval, both projects could up and running in 2017.</p> <p>&ldquo;This document reflects what we heard from our communities and customers,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We asked questions and listened. Residents told us they love their libraries and want more space to read, to study and to gather as a community.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for costs, that too, is determined through the collaborative process with each community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Size, location, new building or existing building, level of philanthropic support; there are many variables that can effect project cost,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Library facilities are generally funded by capital bonds, which must be approved by voters in a designated Library Capital Facilities Area. &ldquo;In the end, it is a decision by the community, not by Sno-Isle Libraries.&rdquo;</p> <p>Work on the plan began mid-2015 when the library district commissioned a study to look at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/12675/12675_20160420023603.pdf">the future of libraries</a>. &ldquo;We could see our own data, but we wanted to check our trends against a national perspective,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Findings from that study, released in September, 2015, confirmed what Sno-Isle Libraries officials were seeing, that libraries are becoming places to meet, study, attend programs and use technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;More people are coming to the community libraries and they are coming for more than checking out a book,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. While numbers vary from library to library, data comparing the first quarter of 2015 and 2016 show an average 12 percent increase in people going to libraries across the district.</p> <p>This past fall, an initial phase of public meetings, an online survey and interviews with community leaders began with the help of the Seattle-based consulting firm, <a href="http://enviroissues.com/">Enviroissues</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;We knew that some of the community libraries are undersized for their communities; the Lake Stevens Library is a prime example,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;But we work closely with our communities to provide the library and services that they want. We needed to go listen to our customers and the communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>That community input became part of a draft plan that was released this past May. &ldquo;Then, we took the draft plan back out to the communities to check our work,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the second phase of public review. An online survey and face-to-face presentations to community groups by her and other library officials helped fine-tune the plan.</p> <p><strong>SIDEBAR</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 728,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=268 New 10-Year Plan for Library Buildings http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=269 <p>A new Lake Stevens Library could be one of as many as seven new facilities in the Sno-Isle Libraries system over the coming decade, according to a plan unanimously approved by the library district&rsquo;s Board of Trustees at the regularly scheduled July 25, 2016 meeting.</p> <p>&ldquo;We call it the &lsquo;Capital facilities Plan,&rsquo; but really it&rsquo;s more of a statement of library building needs across the region,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;This plan responds to the services our customers are requesting and the growth in the communities we serve.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Lake Stevens Library is one of three, along with Arlington and Stanwood, called out in the plan as too small to meet current needs, let alone existing and anticipated growth in those areas.</p> <p>The current Lake Stevens Library can&rsquo;t support requested community events and library programs. In an attempt to accommodate some events and programs, forcing library staff to book space in other public facilities.</p> <p>The area&rsquo;s population is expected to approach 50,000 people by 2025, according to forecasts. The fastest growing areas are projected to be on the west side of the lake. While public comments indicate a strong interest in a new, larger library, expanding at the current location is not possible</p> <p>&ldquo;These communities told us they want new libraries and we&rsquo;re working with them to determine the best way forward,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>The plan puts all library-district facilities in four broad categories: maintain, renovate, replace and areas of opportunity.</p> <p>Most of the existing 21 libraries, and the administrative service center in Marysville, fall into the &ldquo;maintain&rdquo; category. These facilities are anticipated to meet current and projected needs with regular and ongoing maintenance, according to the plan.</p> <p>One facility, the Mill Creek Library, is identified for renovation. Built in 1987 and expanded in 1992, the plan acknowledges that the library &ldquo;is significantly undersized&rdquo; for the community. However, further expansion at the current site may not be possible so the plan recommends renovating the building to maximize its service to the community.</p> <p>The replace category includes Lake Stevens, Arlington and Stanwood.</p> <p>The plan also has &ldquo;Areas of Opportunity&rdquo; category, which includes an interesting mix of projects.</p> <p>&ldquo;The common theme of these projects is addressing unserved or underserved community needs, as well as population growth,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Topping the list is an area identified in the plan as &ldquo;128th Street/Mariner.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;There are 30,000 people living in this island of unincorporated Snohomish County surrounded by Mukilteo, Everett, Mill Creek and Lynnwood,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the area south of the Everett city limits which includes Mariner High School. &ldquo;The tremendous library needs in the Mariner area were becoming apparent a decade ago, but the economic downturn&nbsp;put things on&nbsp;hold.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan calls for a &ldquo;library demonstration project&rdquo; for the area and Woolf-Ivory says it could be up and running in the first quarter of this coming year. Such a project could mean a library using leased space, staffed with existing Sno-Isle Libraries employees and stocked with existing materials and the normal collection-addition processes.</p> <p>The plan calls for a second demonstration project in the Lakewood/Smokey Point area, where significant growth is occurring now with more expected by 2025, according to the plan. &ldquo;The Camano Library (which opened in 2015), started as a demonstration project,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Using the demonstration-project model, I&rsquo;m hoping we can provide increased services to Lakewood/Smokey Point by the fourth quarter of 2017.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan identifies a new library for what is termed the greater Mill Creek area.</p> <p>According to the plan, &ldquo;The current (Mill Creek Library) is too small to adequately serve the existing customer base and significant population growth is projected in the areas east and south of the current Mill Creek Library.&rdquo; Strong community feedback from area residents indicate they want the existing Mill Creek Library to remain at its current location in addition to a new library in the area.</p> <p>Also in the areas-of-opportunity category is the Lynnwood Library. &ldquo;While the existing library meets today&rsquo;s needs, tomorrow is a different story,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>More than 1,000 multi-family housing units are under construction or permitted in and around Lynnwood&rsquo;s core. City officials are also moving forward with the City Center Project, which envisions a new library as part a new civic center. In addition, Lynnwood is already a regional transit hub and Link Light Rail is expected to open in 2023.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to be prepared to support the city&rsquo;s vision for itself,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>While the plan lays out the needs, it doesn&rsquo;t include a timeline for the projects or the costs.</p> <p>&ldquo;Each of these projects is as unique as the community it serves now or will serve,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The timeline for each project will be a collaborative effort and influenced by each community&#39;s sense of urgency for an improved library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That said, some projects on the list that are likely to move ahead more quickly than others.</p> <p>&ldquo;Lake Stevens deserves a new library. We were so close when the economy nosedived,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Still, while there is considerable support for a new, larger library, Lake Stevens-area voters must approve the funding. &ldquo;The soonest that could happen is Feb. 14, 2017,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Also on a potentially faster track are the library demonstration projects at 128<sup>th</sup> Street/Mariner and Lakewood/Smokey Point. Because they will get started with the library district&rsquo;s existing budget and won&rsquo;t require voter approval, both projects could up and running in 2017.</p> <p>&ldquo;This document reflects what we heard from our communities and customers,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We asked questions and listened. Residents told us they love their libraries and want more space to read, to study and to gather as a community.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for costs, that too, is determined through the collaborative process with each community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Size, location, new building or existing building, level of philanthropic support; there are many variables that can effect project cost,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Library facilities are generally funded by capital bonds, which must be approved by voters in a designated Library Capital Facilities Area. &ldquo;In the end, it is a decision by the community, not by Sno-Isle Libraries.&rdquo;</p> <p>Work on the plan began mid-2015 when the library district commissioned a study to look at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/12675/12675_20160420023603.pdf">the future of libraries</a>. &ldquo;We could see our own data, but we wanted to check our trends against a national perspective,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Findings from that study, released in September, 2015, confirmed what Sno-Isle Libraries officials were seeing, that libraries are becoming places to meet, study, attend programs and use technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;More people are coming to the community libraries and they are coming for more than checking out a book,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. While numbers vary from library to library, data comparing the first quarter of 2015 and 2016 show an average 12 percent increase in people going to libraries across the district.</p> <p>This past fall, an initial phase of public meetings, an online survey and interviews with community leaders began with the help of the Seattle-based consulting firm, <a href="http://enviroissues.com/">Enviroissues</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;We knew that some of the community libraries are undersized for their communities; the Lake Stevens Library is a prime example,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;But we work closely with our communities to provide the library and services that they want. We needed to go listen to our customers and the communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>That community input became part of a draft plan that was released this past May. &ldquo;Then, we took the draft plan back out to the communities to check our work,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the second phase of public review. An online survey and face-to-face presentations to community groups by her and other library officials helped fine-tune the plan.</p> <p><strong>SIDEBAR</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 728,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=269 Stanwood Library listed among new 10-year plan for library buildings http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=273 <p>A new Stanwood Library could be one of as many as seven new facilities in the Sno-Isle Libraries system over the coming decade, according to a plan unanimously approved by the library district&rsquo;s Board of Trustees at the regularly scheduled July 25, 2016, meeting.</p> <p>&ldquo;We call it the &lsquo;Capital Facilities Plan,&rsquo; but really it&rsquo;s more of a statement of library building needs across the region,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;This plan responds to the services our customers are requesting and the growth in the communities we serve.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Stanwood Library is one of three, along with Arlington and Lake Stevens, called out in the plan as too small to meet current needs, let alone existing and anticipated growth in those areas.</p> <p>The Stanwood Library was built in 1971 and renovated in 1986. The small meeting room is heavily used. Public seating, study tables and computers are limited due to lack of space. The Stanwood area is projected to grow by 14 percent by 2025.</p> <p>While public comments indicate a strong interest in a new, larger library, the current location may not accommodate expansion.</p> <p>&ldquo;These communities told us they want new libraries and we&rsquo;re working with them to determine the best way forward,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>The plan puts all library-district facilities in four broad categories: maintain, renovate, replace and areas of opportunity.</p> <p>Most of the existing 21 libraries, and the administrative service center in Marysville, fall into the &ldquo;maintain&rdquo; category. These facilities are anticipated to meet current and projected needs with regular and ongoing maintenance, according to the plan.</p> <p>One facility, the Mill Creek Library, is identified for renovation. Built in 1987 and expanded in 1992, the plan acknowledges that the library &ldquo;is significantly undersized&rdquo; for the community. However, further expansion at the current site may not be possible so the plan recommends renovating the building to maximize its service to the community.</p> <p>The replace category includes Stanwood, Arlington and Lake Stevens.</p> <p>The plan also has &ldquo;Areas of Opportunity&rdquo; category, which includes an interesting mix of projects.</p> <p>&ldquo;The common theme of these projects is addressing unserved or underserved community needs, as well as population growth,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Topping the list is an area identified in the plan as &ldquo;128th Street/Mariner.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;There are 30,000 people living in this island of unincorporated Snohomish County surrounded by Mukilteo, Everett, Mill Creek and Lynnwood,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the area south of the Everett city limits which includes Mariner High School. &ldquo;The tremendous library needs in the Mariner area were becoming apparent a decade ago, but the economic downturn put things on&nbsp; hold.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan calls for a &ldquo;library demonstration project&rdquo; for the area and Woolf-Ivory says it could be up and running in the first quarter of this coming year. Such a project could mean a library using leased space, staffed with existing Sno-Isle Libraries employees and stocked with existing materials and the normal collection-addition processes.</p> <p>The plan calls for a second demonstration project in the Lakewood/Smokey Point area, where significant growth is occurring now with more expected by 2025, according to the plan. &ldquo;The Camano Library (which opened in 2015), started as a demonstration project,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Using the demonstration-project model, I&rsquo;m hoping we can provide increased services to Lakewood/Smokey Point by the fourth quarter of 2017.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan identifies a new library for what is termed the greater Mill Creek area.</p> <p>According to the plan, &ldquo;The current (Mill Creek Library) is too small to adequately serve the existing customer base and significant population growth is projected in the areas east and south of the current Mill Creek Library.&rdquo; Strong community feedback from area residents indicate they want the existing Mill Creek Library to remain at its current location in addition to a new library in the area.</p> <p>Also in the areas-of-opportunity category is the Lynnwood Library. &ldquo;While the existing library meets today&rsquo;s needs, tomorrow is a different story,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>More than 1,000 multi-family housing units are under construction or permitted in and around Lynnwood&rsquo;s core. City officials are also moving forward with the City Center Project, which envisions a new library as part a new civic center. In addition, Lynwood is already a regional transit hub and Link Light Rail is expected to open in 2023.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to be prepared to support the city&rsquo;s vision for itself,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>While the plan lays out the needs, it doesn&rsquo;t include a timeline for the projects or the costs.</p> <p>&ldquo;Each of these projects is as unique as the community it serves now or will serve,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The timeline for each project will be a collaborative effort and influenced by each community&#39;s sense of urgency for an improved library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That said, some projects on the list that are likely to move ahead more quickly than others.</p> <p>&ldquo;Lake Stevens&rsquo; efforts for a new library 10 years ago were frustrated by the economic downturn,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Voter-approval for funding will be required to match the community&rsquo;s urgency for a larger library. &ldquo;The soonest that could happen is Feb. 14, 2017,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Also on a potentially faster track are the library demonstration projects at 128<sup>th</sup> Street/Mariner and Lakewood/Smokey Point. Because they will get started with the library district&rsquo;s existing budget and won&rsquo;t require voter approval, both projects could up and running in 2017.</p> <p>&ldquo;This document reflects what we heard from our communities and customers,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We asked questions and listened. Residents told us they love their libraries and want more space to read, to study and to gather as a community.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for costs, that, too, is determined through the collaborative process with each community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Size, location, new building or existing building, level of philanthropic support; there are many variables that can affect project cost,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Library facilities are generally funded by capital bonds, which must be approved by voters in a designated Library Capital Facilities Area. &ldquo;In the end, it is a decision by the community, not by Sno-Isle Libraries.&rdquo;</p> <p>Work on the plan began mid-2015 when the library district commissioned a study to look at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/12675/12675_20160420023603.pdf">the future of libraries</a>. &ldquo;We could see our own data, but we wanted to check our trends against a national perspective,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Findings from that study, released in September, 2015, confirmed what Sno-Isle Libraries officials were seeing, that libraries are becoming places to meet, study, attend programs and use technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;More people are coming to the community libraries and they are coming for more than checking out a book,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. While numbers vary from library to library, data comparing the first quarter of 2015 and 2016 show an average 12 percent increase in people going to libraries across the district.</p> <p>This past fall, an initial phase of public meetings, an online survey and interviews with community leaders began with the help of the Seattle-based consulting firm, <a href="http://enviroissues.com/" target="_blank">EnviroIssues</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;We knew that some of the community libraries are undersized for their communities; the Lake Stevens Library is a prime example,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;But we work closely with our communities to provide the library and services that they want. We needed to go listen to our customers and the communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>That community input became part of a draft plan that was released this past May. &ldquo;Then, we took the draft plan back out to the communities to check our work,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the second phase of public review. An online survey and face-to-face presentations to community groups by her and other library officials helped fine-tune the plan.</p> <p><strong>SIDEBAR</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 728,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=273 Arlington Library listed among new 10-year plan for library buildings http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=274 <p>A new Arlington Library could be one of as many as seven new facilities in the Sno-Isle Libraries system over the coming decade, according to a plan unanimously approved by the library district&rsquo;s Board of Trustees at the regularly scheduled July 25, 2016, meeting.</p> <p>&ldquo;We call it the &lsquo;Capital Facilities Plan,&rsquo; but really it&rsquo;s more of a statement of library building needs across the entire region,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;This plan responds to the services our customers are requesting and the growth in the communities we serve.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Arlington Library is one of three, along with Lake Stevens and Stanwood, called out in the plan as too small to meet current needs, let alone anticipated growth in those areas.</p> <p>&ldquo;These communities told us they want new libraries and we&rsquo;re working with them to determine the best way forward,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Arlington voters have come tantalizingly close in the past to approving a new library. In the draft version of the now-approved plan, Arlington was slated for a renovation of the existing building. However, community input on the draft plan brought a change in the final version.</p> <p>&ldquo;We did make some changes,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The community told us they wanted more, that they want a new building, and that&rsquo;s reflected in the plan approved by our trustees.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan puts all library-district facilities in four broad categories: maintain, renovate, replace and areas of opportunity.</p> <p>Most of the existing 21 libraries, and the administrative service center in Marysville, fall into the &ldquo;maintain&rdquo; category. These facilities are anticipated to meet current and projected needs with regular and ongoing maintenance, according to the plan.</p> <p>One facility, the Mill Creek Library, is identified for renovation. Built in 1987 and expanded in 1992, the plan acknowledges that the library &ldquo;is significantly undersized&rdquo; for the community. However, further expansion at the current site may not be possible so the plan recommends renovating the building to maximize its service to the community.</p> <p>The replace category includes Arlington, Lake Stevens and Stanwood.</p> <p>The plan also has &ldquo;Areas of Opportunity&rdquo; category, which includes an interesting mix of projects.</p> <p>&ldquo;The common theme of these projects is addressing unserved or underserved community needs, as well as population growth,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Topping the list is an area identified in the plan as &ldquo;128th Street/Mariner.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;There are 30,000 people living in this island of unincorporated Snohomish County surrounded by Mukilteo, Everett, Mill Creek and Lynnwood,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the area south of the Everett city limits which includes Mariner High School. &ldquo;The tremendous library needs in the Mariner area were becoming apparent a decade ago, but the economic downturn put things on&nbsp;hold.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan calls for a &ldquo;library demonstration project&rdquo; for the area and Woolf-Ivory says it could be up and running in the first quarter of this coming year. Such a project could mean a library using leased space, staffed with existing Sno-Isle Libraries employees and stocked with existing materials and the normal collection-addition processes.</p> <p>The plan calls for a second demonstration project in the Lakewood/Smokey Point area, where significant growth is occurring now with more expected by 2025, according to the plan. &ldquo;The Camano Library (which opened in 2015), started as a demonstration project,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Using the demonstration-project model, I&rsquo;m hoping we can provide increased services to Lakewood/Smokey Point by the fourth quarter of 2017.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan identifies a new library for what is termed the greater Mill Creek area.</p> <p>According to the plan, &ldquo;The current (Mill Creek Library) is too small to adequately serve the existing customer base and significant population growth is projected in the areas east and south of the current Mill Creek Library.&rdquo; Strong community feedback from area residents indicate they want the existing Mill Creek Library to remain at its current location in addition to a new library in the area.</p> <p>Also in the areas-of-opportunity category is the Lynnwood Library. &ldquo;While the existing library meets today&rsquo;s needs, tomorrow is a different story,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>More than 1,000 multi-family housing units are under construction or permitted in and around Lynnwood&rsquo;s core. City officials are also moving forward with the City Center Project, which envisions a new library as part a new civic center. In addition, Lynnwood is already a regional transit hub and Link Light Rail is expected to open in 2023.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to be prepared to support the city&rsquo;s vision for itself,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>While the plan lays out the needs, it doesn&rsquo;t include a timeline for the projects or the costs.</p> <p>&ldquo;Each of these projects is as unique as the community it serves now or will serve,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The timeline for each project will be a collaborative effort and influenced by each community&#39;s sense of urgency for an improved library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That said, some projects on the list that are likely to move ahead more quickly than others.</p> <p>&ldquo;Lake Stevens&rsquo; efforts for a new library 10 years ago were frustrated by the economic downturn,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Voter-approval for funding will be required to match the community&rsquo;s urgency for a larger library. &ldquo;The soonest that could happen is Feb. 14, 2017,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Also on a potentially faster track are the library demonstration projects at 128<sup>th</sup> Street/Mariner and Lakewood/Smokey Point. Because they will get started with the library district&rsquo;s existing budget and won&rsquo;t require voter approval, both projects could up and running in 2017.</p> <p>&ldquo;This document reflects what we heard from our communities and customers,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We asked questions and listened. Residents told us they love their libraries and want more space to read, to study and to gather as a community.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for costs, that, too, is determined through the collaborative process with each community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Size, location, new building or existing building, level of philanthropic support; there are many variables that can affect project cost,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Library facilities are generally funded by capital bonds, which must be approved by voters in a designated Library Capital Facilities Area. &ldquo;In the end, it is a decision by the community, not by Sno-Isle Libraries.&rdquo;</p> <p>Work on the plan began mid-2015 when the library district commissioned a study to look at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/12675/12675_20160420023603.pdf">the future of libraries</a>. &ldquo;We could see our own data, but we wanted to check our trends against a national perspective,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Findings from that study, released in September, 2015, confirmed what Sno-Isle Libraries officials were seeing, that libraries are becoming places to meet, study, attend programs and use technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;More people are coming to the community libraries and they are coming for more than checking out a book,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. While numbers vary from library to library, data comparing the first quarter of 2015 and 2016 show an average 12 percent increase in people going to libraries across the district.</p> <p>This past fall, an initial phase of public meetings, an online survey and interviews with community leaders began with the help of the Seattle-based consulting firm, <a href="http://enviroissues.com/" target="_blank">EnviroIssues</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;We knew that some of the community libraries are undersized for their communities; the Lake Stevens Library is a prime example,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;But we work closely with our communities to provide the library and services that they want. We needed to go listen to our customers and the communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>That community input became part of a draft plan that was released this past May. &ldquo;Then, we took the draft plan back out to the communities to check our work,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the second phase of public review. An online survey and face-to-face presentations to community groups by her and other library officials helped fine-tune the plan.</p> <p><strong>SIDEBAR</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 728,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=274 New 10-year plan for library buildings approved http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=275 <p>There could be as many as seven new facilities in the Sno-Isle Libraries system over the coming decade, according to a plan unanimously approved by the library district&rsquo;s Board of Trustees at the regularly scheduled July 25, 2016, meeting.</p> <p>&ldquo;We call it the &lsquo;Capital Facilities Plan,&rsquo; but really it&rsquo;s more of a statement of capital facilities needs across the district,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;This plan responds to the services our customers are requesting and the growth in the communities we serve.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan is available online at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/facplan">sno-isle.org/facplan</a>. It puts facilities in four broad categories: maintain, renovate, replace and areas of opportunity.</p> <p><img alt="" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/2604/2604_20160727121503.jpg" style="float:right; height:410px; width:500px" />Most of the existing 21 libraries, and the administrative service center in Marysville, fall into the &ldquo;maintain&rdquo; category. These facilities are anticipated to meet current and projected needs with regular and ongoing maintenance, according to the plan.</p> <p>One facility, the Mill Creek Library, is identified for renovation. Built in 1987 and expanded in 1992, the plan acknowledges that the library &ldquo;is significantly undersized&rdquo; for the community. However, further expansion at the current site may not be possible so the plan recommends renovating the building to maximize its service to the community.</p> <p>The plan also calls out library buildings in Arlington, Lake Stevens and Stanwood as too small to meet current needs, let alone existing and anticipated growth in those areas.</p> <p>&ldquo;These communities told us they want new libraries and we&rsquo;re working with them to determine the best way forward,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;There are reasons for each of these facilities to be replaced.&rdquo;</p> <p>The approved facilities plan refers to an &ldquo;Areas of Opportunity&rdquo; category, which includes an interesting mix of projects.</p> <p>&ldquo;The common theme of these projects is addressing unserved or underserved community needs, as well as population growth,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Topping the list is an area identified in the plan as &ldquo;128th Street/Mariner.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;There are 30,000 people living in this island of unincorporated Snohomish County surrounded by Mukilteo, Everett, Mill Creek and Lynnwood,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the area south of the Everett city limits which includes Mariner High School. &ldquo;The tremendous library needs in the Mariner area were becoming apparent a decade ago, but the economic downturn put things on&nbsp; hold.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan calls for a &ldquo;library demonstration project&rdquo; for the area and Woolf-Ivory says it could be up and running in the first quarter of this coming year. Such a project could mean a library using leased space, staffed with existing Sno-Isle Libraries employees and stocked with existing materials and the normal collection-addition processes.</p> <p>The plan calls for a second demonstration project in the Lakewood/Smokey Point area, where significant growth is occurring now with more expected by 2025, according to the plan. &ldquo;The Camano Library (which opened in 2015), started as a demonstration project,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;Using the demonstration-project model, I&rsquo;m hoping we can provide increased services to Lakewood/Smokey Point by the fourth quarter of 2017.&rdquo;</p> <p>The plan identifies a new library for what is termed the greater Mill Creek area.</p> <p>According to the plan, &ldquo;The current (Mill Creek Library) is too small to adequately serve the existing customer base and significant population growth is projected in the areas east and south of the current Mill Creek Library.&rdquo; Strong community feedback from area residents indicate they want the existing Mill Creek Library to remain at its current location in addition to a new library in the area.</p> <p>Also in the areas-of-opportunity category is the Lynnwood Library. &ldquo;While the existing library meets today&rsquo;s needs, tomorrow is a different story,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>More than 1,000 multi-family housing units are under construction or permitted in and around Lynnwood&rsquo;s core. City officials are also moving forward with the City Center Project, which envisions a new library as part a new civic center. In addition, Lynwood is already a regional transit hub and Link Light Rail is expected to open in 2023.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to be prepared to support the city&rsquo;s vision for itself,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>While the plan lays out the needs, it doesn&rsquo;t include a timeline for the projects or the costs.</p> <p>&ldquo;Each of these projects is as unique as the community it serves now or will serve,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The timeline for each project will be a collaborative effort and influenced by each community&#39;s sense of urgency for an improved library.&rdquo;</p> <p>That said, some projects on the list that are likely to move ahead more quickly than others.</p> <p>&ldquo;Lake Stevens&rsquo; efforts for a new library 10 years ago were frustrated by the economic downturn,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Voter-approval for funding will be required to match the community&rsquo;s urgency for a larger library. &ldquo;The soonest that could happen is Feb. 14, 2017,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said.</p> <p>Also on a potentially faster track are the library demonstration projects at 128<sup>th</sup>&nbsp;Street/Mariner and Lakewood/Smokey Point. Because they will get started with the library district&rsquo;s existing budget and won&rsquo;t require voter approval, both projects could up and running in 2017.</p> <p>&ldquo;This document reflects what we heard from our communities and customers,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We asked questions and listened. Residents told us they love their libraries and want more space to read, to study and to gather as a community.&rdquo;</p> <p>As for costs, that, too, is determined through the collaborative process with each community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Size, location, new building or existing building, level of philanthropic support; there are many variables that can affect project cost,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Library facilities are generally funded by capital bonds, which must be approved by voters in a designated Library Capital Facilities Area. &ldquo;In the end, it is a decision by the community, not by Sno-Isle Libraries.&rdquo;</p> <p>Work on the plan began mid-2015 when the library district commissioned a study to look at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/12675/12675_20160420023603.pdf">the future of libraries</a>. &ldquo;We could see our own data, but we wanted to check our trends against a national perspective,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. Findings from that study, released in September, 2015, confirmed what Sno-Isle Libraries officials were seeing, that libraries are becoming places to meet, study, attend programs and use technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;More people are coming to the community libraries and they are coming for more than checking out a book,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. While numbers vary from library to library, data comparing the first quarter of 2015 and 2016 show an average 12 percent increase in people going to libraries across the district.</p> <p>This past fall, an initial phase of public meetings, an online survey and interviews with community leaders began with the help of the Seattle-based consulting firm,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.enviroissues.com/" target="_blank">EnviroIssues</a>.</p> <p>&ldquo;We knew that some of the community libraries are undersized for their communities; the Lake Stevens Library is a prime example,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;But we work closely with our communities to provide the library and services that they want. We needed to go listen to our customers and the communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>That community input became part of a draft plan that was released this past May. &ldquo;Then, we took the draft plan back out to the communities to check our work,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said of the second phase of public review. An online survey and face-to-face presentations to community groups by her and other library officials helped fine-tune the plan.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was very helpful and we did make some changes,&rdquo; Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;For example, the draft plan identified the Arlington Library for renovation. The community told us they wanted more, that they want a new building, and that&rsquo;s reflected in the plan approved by our trustees.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>SIDEBAR</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 728,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=275 ALA honors Maloney for Whidbey Reads poster http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=263 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:300px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Boys in the boat poster" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160720035508.jpg" style="float:left; height:381px; width:300px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><em>This Whidbey Reads poster by Brenda Maloney was part of the work that&nbsp;won the 2015 American Libraries Association contest in that category.</em></p> <p><a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskzcLFRd"><em>See a gallery of other Sno-isle Libraries posters by Maloney.</em></a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Brenda Maloney, graphic designer for Sno-Isle Libraries, has been recognized by the American Library Association (ALA) for her work.</p> <p>Maloney&rsquo;s posters and programs for Whidbey Reads 2015 won in the category of &ldquo;Reading Program Themes (all ages) -print&rdquo; in the large library group. The award was announced in June at the ALA national conference in June. This is the third year in a row that Maloney has been honored in the ALA&rsquo;s PR Xchange Awards Competition.</p> <p>Contest organizers said the panel of 17 judges was very impressed with the depth and breadth of all of the work submitted. About 390 entries were submitted and judges called the competition &ldquo;extremely tight.&rdquo;</p> <p>The complete <a href="http://tinyurl.com/PRXchange-winners-2016">list of winners</a> is available online, as is the <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/mobile/markaaronpolger/2016-pr-xchange-award-winners">slide show</a> presented at the PR Xchange Awards ceremony at the 2016 American Library Association conference.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Julie Titone, Communications and Marketing Manager, 360-651-7081, jtitone.sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 20 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=263 Robot Rally brings turnout for technology http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=262 <p>More than 50 children, tweens, teens and adults built, programmed and operated robots on Saturday, July 16 at the Marysville Library, all part of the &ldquo;Robot Rally&rdquo; program.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:400px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Robot rally photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160718054054.jpg" style="float:left; height:267px; width:400px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Jose Alcantara holds his robot after a successful run at the&nbsp;Robot Rally, July 16, 2016, at the Marysville Library.<br /> <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskEytzP2">Photo gallery</a></em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&ldquo;I think it was really successful,&rdquo; Jill Wubbenhorst, assistant managing librarian at the Marysville Library, said as the event was wrapping up. &ldquo;We had children with their parents, the high-school team and university students.&rdquo;</p> <p>The event included demonstrations by the Lakewood High School&#39;s Full Metal Robotics team, the Cedarcrest Middle School Timberbots and the Washington State University - Everett engineering club. The WSU students brought components from their second-place entry in the University Rover Challenge at the Mars Desert Research Station in Hanksville, Utah.</p> <p>Participants on Saturday were able to use Ozobots, LEGO Mindstorm robots and laptop computers.</p> <p>Kathy Smargiassi, children&rsquo;s librarian at the Marysville Library, was helping some of the younger participants get their first experiences with robot hardware and the coding that makes robots work. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s not that I&rsquo;m an expert, but the lesson is you don&rsquo;t have to be to get started,&rdquo; Smargiassi said.</p> <p>But there were experts on-site, including Austin Sundseth, Vice President of the Engineering Club at WSU&nbsp;&ndash; Everett. Sundseth and his club-mates recently <a href="https://news.wsu.edu/2016/06/06/mars-rover-team-wins-second-international-competition/">placed second in an international competition</a> to build Mars rover prototypes. To make many of the specialized parts they needed, club members worked closely with the <a href="http://www.everettcc.edu/ccec/amtec/">Advanced Manufacturing Training and Education Center</a> at Everett Community College.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was a great experience and we&rsquo;re getting ready to enter again next year,&rdquo; Sundseth to a group of younger attendees. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m from Marysville, went to high school here and did Running Start. When I graduate with a degree in Mechanical Engineering, I&rsquo;ll be 20 years old.&rdquo;</p> <p>And then what?</p> <p>&ldquo;I want to work on space technology,&rdquo; said Sundseth, adding that he&rsquo;s got his sights set on companies such as Blue Origin, the Kent-based space firm set up by&nbsp;Amazon&nbsp;founder&nbsp;Jeff Bezos.</p> <p>The event was part of Sno-Isle Libraries&rsquo; <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/summerteens">Explore Summer</a> program and funded by the Gellerson Memorial Programming Endowment through the <a href="http://sno-islefoundation.org/">Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation</a>.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Marta Murvosh, Marysville Library Teen Librarian, 360-651-5033, mmurvosh@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 18 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=262 Pokémon among the stacks: Libraries welcome players http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=261 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:350px"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><img alt="Pokemon photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160715121933.jpg" style="float:left; height:261px; line-height:22.4px; width:350px" /></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Pok&eacute;mon at the Arlington Library</em></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="background-color:rgb(204, 204, 204)"> <p><em>&ldquo;I wanna be the very best,</em></p> <p><em>Like no one ever was.</em></p> <p><em>To catch them is my real test,</em></p> <p><em>To train them is my cause.</em></p> <p><em>&hellip; Gotta catch &rsquo;em all.&rdquo;</em></p> <p style="text-align:right"><strong>Lyrics from the Pok&eacute;mon<br /> TV show&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyXTgqJtoGM">theme song</a></strong></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>On July 11, a group of 20-somethings walked into the Stanwood Library and stood in a circle.</p> <p>With heads down, they stared intently at their phones.</p> <p>Unsure, library staffer Melissa Borders approached the all-male group and asked:</p> <p>&ldquo;Are you playing Pok&eacute;mon GO?&rdquo;</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a scene playing out more and more since the mobile online game launched in the U.S. on July 6 and one that is especially common in places such as libraries.</p> <p>&ldquo;We love it,&rdquo; said Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory. &ldquo;We are all about supporting our communities and Pok&eacute;mon GO has quickly become something our customers are embracing.&rdquo;</p> <p>Libraries and other public places figure prominently in the world of Pok&eacute;mon GO. Players go in search of Pok&eacute;mon figures, which they capture and then train at Pok&eacute;mon GO Gyms. Along the way, they may need supplies, which are available at Pok&eacute;Stops.</p> <p>Libraries can be any or all of those things and Sno-Isle Libraries welcomes players on their quests.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re putting up signs that say &lsquo;Welcome Pok&eacute;mon Trainers,&rdquo; said Dawn Rutherford, Teen Services Coordinator for the library district. If there is one caveat, it is a request to respect other library users while capturing Pok&eacute;mon, training or resupplying.</p> <p>So far, that doesn&rsquo;t seem to be a problem.</p> <p>&ldquo;Pok&eacute;mon GO players can be very focused on the game,&rdquo; Rutherford said. &ldquo;We are also hearing stories of people making it out of the house more and families walking around playing the game together. We are thrilled to be a place Pok&eacute;mon trainers can safely connect and discover!&rdquo;</p> <p>Rutherford added that it appears that most if not all Sno-Isle Libraries facilities are identified in some way in Pok&eacute;mon GO: &ldquo;Some of our libraries are Gyms, many are Pok&eacute;Stops and I&rsquo;m pretty sure all have Pok&eacute;mon waiting to be caught.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 728,745 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Dawn Rutherford,&nbsp;Teen Services Coordinator, 360-651-7069, drutherford@sno-isle.org</li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> Fri, 15 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=261 'Write Now' looking for instructors with 'write stuff' http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=260 <p>Ernest Hemingway said writing is easy: &ldquo;All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.&rdquo;</p> <p>There definitely won&rsquo;t be&nbsp;any bleeding and typewriters are unlikely, but Sno-Isle Libraries is looking for people who can help others be writers, maybe even the next Hemingway.</p> <p><img alt="Write Now graphic" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160707121001.jpg" style="border-style:solid; border-width:0px; float:right; height:210px; margin-left:5px; margin-right:5px; width:400px" />&ldquo;We&rsquo;re soliciting proposals for a series of workshops, classes, lectures and presentations,&rdquo; said Lead Librarian for Readers&rsquo; Services Jackie Parker. &ldquo;The project is called <a href="http://goo.gl/forms/zwu39n0VxzsjeoQV2">&lsquo;Write Now: Write, Revise, Publish, and Find an Audience.&rsquo;</a>&rdquo;</p> <p>The goal, Parker said, is to help writers and prospective writers develop their skills.</p> <p>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s been a lot of interest from local authors and attendees at writing and author-related events,&rdquo; Parker said.&nbsp; &ldquo;Writers are readers, readers are often writers and Sno-Isle Libraries has hundreds of thousands of readers.&rdquo;</p> <p>The project is accepting proposals that cover any step of the writing and publishing process and from any perspective, including: traditional publishing, indie/self-publishing, fiction, non-fiction, author, agent, bookseller and marketing. Selected proposals will include clearly measurable learning outcomes that will be measured in a post-event survey.</p> <p>Sample session topics include:</p> <ul> <li>Specific aspects of how to write or revise</li> <li>How to get an agent</li> <li>How to self-publish</li> <li>How to design a book cover</li> <li>How to market a book on social media</li> <li>How to approach booksellers</li> </ul> <p>&ldquo;The strongest proposals will be on a list of courses that each our 21 community libraries can book,&rdquo; Parker said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re hoping to sponsor between 15-20 sessions this fall.&rdquo;</p> <p>The timeline for fall 2016 classes is:</p> <ul> <li>July 20: Proposals due</li> <li>July 28: Notice of acceptance</li> <li>July 29: Session list sent to community libraries for bookings</li> <li>October-December: Sessions to take place</li> </ul> <p>Parker said she is reaching out to established writers groups in the Snohomish and Island counties, but that proposals will be considered from all corners. If the series is a success, Sno-Isle Libraries will continue to offer the Write Now series through 2017.</p> <p>Parameters for proposals include:</p> <ul> <li>Must be submitted through the <a href="http://goo.gl/forms/zwu39n0VxzsjeoQV2">online form</a>.</li> <li>Sessions should range from 1-4 hours.</li> <li>Presentations should focus on learning</li> <li>Presentations may include contact information for the presenter</li> <li>Presenters are welcome to sell books after their session.</li> <li>Sno-Isle Libraries will not provide presenters with a list of registered attendees due to privacy policies.</li> <li>Sno-Isle Libraries will market classes to the public and presenters are encouraged to promote to their networks.</li> <li>A contract with Sno-Isle Libraries is required to ensure engagement and payment.</li> </ul> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Jackie Parker, Lead Librarian for Readers&rsquo; Services, 360-651-7049, <a href="mailto:jparker@sno-isle.org">jparker@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Thu, 07 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=260 Candidate, issue forums July 6 & 7 on Whidbey Island http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=259 <p><img alt="League of Women Voters and Sno-Isle Libraries logos" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160705120459.jpg" style="float:right; height:102px; margin:0px 5px; width:400px" />The League of Women Voters and Sno-Isle Libraries are partnering on two public forums for races and issues to be decided in the August primary election. League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island representatives will ask questions of the candidates at these events which are free and open to the public.</p> <p>The scheduled forums are:</p> <p><strong>Wednesday, July 6, 6:30 p.m., at Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 Ernst St., Oak Harbor</strong></p> <ul> <li>10th Legislative District Senate - Candidates expected to attend include Sen. Barbara Bailey, Angie Homola and Nick Petrish.</li> <li>Island County Board of Commissioners Pos. 2 &ndash; Candidates expected to attend include Commissioner Jill Johnson, John Fowkes and Dustin Amundson.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Thursday, July 7, 6:30 p.m., at Unitarian Universalist Church, 20103 SR 525, Freeland</strong></p> <ul> <li>10th Legislative District Senate - Candidates expected to attend include Sen. Barbara Bailey, Angie Homola and Nick Petrish.</li> <li>Discussion of Port District of South Whidbey Island ballot measure &ldquo;Concerning Fairgrounds property and a property tax increase to support it.&rdquo;</li> </ul> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island, <a href="mailto:lwv.whidbey@gmail.com">lwv.whidbey@gmail.com</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Tue, 05 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=259 Speaking at teen-suicide forums difficult, but rewarding, choice http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=258 <p><img alt="Megan LaPlante photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160701031249.jpg" style="float:left; height:362px; width:900px" /></p> <p><em>Megan LaPlante (right) speaks during the June 23 Issues That Matter forum at Snohomish Library. Listening are Rena Fitzgerald (left) and Dr. Gary Goldbaum. <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskCYo69D">Photo gallery</a></em></p> <p>It was the end of an eighth-grade choir field trip and Megan LaPlante and her friend were braiding each other&rsquo;s hair.</p> <p>&ldquo;They were laughing, just girls being girls,&rdquo; said Megan&rsquo;s mom, Susan LaPlante.</p> <p>Hours later, the friend took her own life.</p> <p>It wasn&rsquo;t until the next morning at school that Megan and her classmates learned about the suicide.</p> <p>&ldquo;I got a call from Megan about 8:15 in the morning. It was awful,&rdquo; Susan LaPlante said. &ldquo;She couldn&rsquo;t speak; just sobbing.&rdquo;</p> <table align="right" border="1" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" style="width:400px"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/issues-that-matter"><strong>Issues That Matter &ndash; Teen Suicide</strong></a></p> <p>Three more Issues That Matter forums on teen suicide are scheduled:</p> <ul> <li>July 7,&nbsp;Stanwood Camano Community Resource Center, 9612 271st St. NW, Stanwood</li> <li>July 13, Rosehill Community Center, 304 Lincoln Ave., Mukilteo</li> <li>July 21, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr., Oak Harbor</li> </ul> <p>All events start at 6:30 p.m. They are open and free&nbsp;to the public&nbsp;with funding provided by the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. The forums feature panels&nbsp;of experts and community members to discuss what can be done about teen suicide.</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://sno-isle.org/?ID=2903&amp;lid=1525&amp;srec=595145">Reading list</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>Online resources</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.islandcountywa.gov/Health/AHC/Documents/HYS2014mentalhealth.pdf" target="_blank">Island County: Youth and Mental Health</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.snohd.org/Healthy-Living/Healthy-Communities/Suicide-Prevention" target="_blank">Snohomish County Health District suicide prevention resources&nbsp;</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/">National Suicide Prevention Lifeline&nbsp;</a>(800-273-8255)</li> <li><a href="http://www.sptsusa.org/" target="_blank">Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide</a></li> <li><a href="http://scsuicideprevention.org/" target="_blank">Stanwood Camano Community Action</a></li> <li><a href="https://prezi.com/aptt2_ax03ob/suicide-in-island-county/" target="_blank">Suicide in Island County: Island County Board of Health Presentation</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.thetrevorproject.org/" target="_blank">The Trevor Project</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.intheforefront.org/" target="_blank">University of Washington Forefront</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.carecrisischat.org/" target="_blank">Volunteers of America Care Crisis Chat</a> (800-584-3578)</li> <li><a href="http://866teenlink.org/about-teen-link/" target="_blank">Washington Recovery Help Line Teen Link</a></li> <li><a href="http://win211.org/" target="_blank">Washington State 2-1-1</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/InjuryandViolencePrevention/YouthSuicidePrevention" target="_blank">Washington State Department of Health Youth Suicide Prevention</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.yspp.org/" target="_blank">Washington State Youth Suicide Prevention Program</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>Library research resources</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/research/gvrl">Gale Virtual Reference Library</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/research/masterfile-premier">MasterFILE Premier</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/research/viewpoints">Opposing Viewpoints in Context&nbsp;</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/research/proquest-family-health">ProQuest Family Health</a></li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>A year later, the loss still feels fresh, but Megan is working to turn tragedy into something that may help others. A freshman at Monroe High School, Megan is also Miss Washington High School&nbsp;America and will compete for the national title, July 15-16 in San Antonio, Texas.</p> <p>As part of the pageant, each contestant is required to have an advocacy platform, something that they not only feel passionately about, but are also supporting with their time and voice. After losing her friend in 2015, Megan decided her platform would be &ldquo;Preventing Teen Suicide through Hope and Awareness.&rdquo;</p> <p>It wasn&rsquo;t an easy choice.</p> <p>&ldquo;Megan wasn&rsquo;t sure,&rdquo; Susan LaPlante said. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s so personal and so difficult. We talked about it a lot. I told her, &lsquo;You need to talk about it for yourself.&nbsp; And, it can help others.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p>While she&rsquo;ll be taking the message to the national stage, Megan&rsquo;s first opportunity to speak publically on the subject came June 23 at Sno-Isle Libraries&rsquo; Issues That Matter forum on teen suicide at Snohomish Library. &nbsp;She will speak at similar forums on July 7 in Stanwood and July 21 in Oak Harbor.</p> <p>At the Snohomish event, the public packed the meeting room. Megan was on the panel with two experts on the issue, Dr. Gary Goldbaum, Director of the Snohomish Health District, and Rena Fitzgerald, manager of the Care Crisis Chat line at Volunteers of America Western Washington in Everett.</p> <p>When it was her turn to speak, Megan&rsquo;s voice was charged with emotion.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s such a big issue, but not a lot of people know about it,&rdquo; Megan said later. &ldquo;People don&rsquo;t touch on it. Parents don&rsquo;t learn about this and kids die. They don&rsquo;t know, but they should know about this.&rdquo;</p> <p>The path to suicide, why some choose it and others don&rsquo;t, can be difficult to understand. From Megan&rsquo;s perspective, one important thing to do is just be there for someone who reaches out.</p> <p>&ldquo;If they&rsquo;ve opened up to you, they are trusting you and thinking you will do something and possibly stop it,&rdquo; Megan said. &ldquo;Just hang out as much as possible and make them feel loved and welcome because they are, they really are.</p> <p>&ldquo;There are things that you can do. Say, &lsquo;Come on over,&rsquo; or &lsquo;Go to a movie with me.&rsquo;&nbsp; And if they say, &lsquo;Leave me alone,&rsquo; tell them, &lsquo;No, you&rsquo;re hurting, I&rsquo;m staying with you.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p>Part of Megan&rsquo;s platform is to work with the <a href="http://afsp.org/">American Foundation for Suicide</a> Prevention. The organization works with local supporters to sponsor Out of the Darkness Walks to raise funds for suicide prevention work. Fellow panelist Fitzgerald and Denise Bathurst, a Mukilteo School District counselor, are organizing a walk for <a href="http://afsp.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&amp;eventID=4145">Oct. 15 at Legion Park in Everett</a>.</p> <p>While choosing to speak about teen suicide wasn&rsquo;t easy for Megan, the response at the Issues That Matter Forum convinced her that it was the right choice.</p> <p>&ldquo;A girl came up to me after it was over to say how much it helped,&rdquo; Megan said.</p> <p>Susan LaPlante had a similar experience with a parent.</p> <p>&ldquo;The father of a boy who died in April came up and said Megan&rsquo;s comments were so relevant. It was very confirming,&rdquo; Susan LaPlante said. &ldquo;That night was amazing.&rdquo;</p> Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=258 'Storytime' is about growth; the children and the community http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=257 <table align="left" border="0" cellpadding="10" cellspacing="10" style="width:900px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160629044343.jpg " style="float:left; height:454px; width:900px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Logan Schlicker launches a toy airplane during Storytime at Lake Stevens Library. <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskDcCbxj">(Photo gallery)</a></em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Two or three mornings a week, the Lake Stevens Library is full of young readers.</p> <p>Well, make that soon-to-be young readers and don&rsquo;t expect it to be whisper-quiet because the groups that are filling the air and floor are all under age 5 and accompanied by a parent or caregiver. It&rsquo;s called <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/kids/ready-readers">&ldquo;Storytime&rdquo;</a> and children&rsquo;s librarian Monica Jackson says it is a popular and growing program.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="8" cellspacing="8" style="width:400px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160629043710.jpg" style="float:left; height:267px; width:400px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Lindsay Johns and her daughter, Ava, during Storytime at Lake Stevens Library.</em></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><a href="http://host5.evanced.info/sno_isle/evanced/eventcalendar.asp?ag=&amp;et=&amp;dt=dr&amp;ds=2016-6-29&amp;de=2016-7-29&amp;df=calendar&amp;cn=0&amp;private=0&amp;ln=9"><strong>Storytime Schedule</strong></a></p> <p>Summer</p> <ul> <li>Toddler (18 months- 3 years): 10 a.m., Mondays, July 11, 18, 25 and Aug. 1</li> <li> <p>Preschool (3-5 years): 10 a.m., Thursdays, July 7, 14, 21, 28 and Aug. 4</p> <p><em>*Note: The July 7 Preschool Storytime at Lake Stevens Library will feature the Washington State University Extension Beach Watchers, a group of trained beach naturalists dedicated to the protection of Puget Sound beaches through education. </em></p> </li> </ul> <p>Fall (weekly, starting Sept. 20)</p> <ul> <li> <p>Baby (newborn-18 months): 10 a.m., Tuesdays</p> </li> <li> <p>Toddler (18 months- 3 years): 10 a.m., Wednesdays</p> </li> <li> <p>Preschool (3-5 years): 10 a.m., Thursdays</p> </li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&ldquo;Every week it seems a new child and parent are joining us,&rdquo; said Jackson, who is the children&rsquo;s librarian at the library. &ldquo;The Lake Stevens area is just growing so fast with young families.&rdquo;</p> <p>On a recent morning, one of those first-timers was Mandi Schlicker and her son, Logan.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was our first time to visit the library for Storytime,&rdquo; Schlicker said. &ldquo;The program offered many aspects of entertainment for Logan, stories, singing, dancing and then a little play time with lots of toys. We look forward to going again!&rdquo;</p> <p>And, it&rsquo;s not just the little ones who like these 60-minute sessions: &ldquo;It was nice to socialize with other moms,&rdquo; Schlicker said.</p> <p>Lake Stevens Library Managing Librarian Sonia Gustafson agrees that while such reading programs are popular at most libraries, the community&rsquo;s demographics make them particularly attractive in Lake Stevens.</p> <p>&ldquo;This area is growing fast,&rdquo; said Gustafson, who stays close to community issues by regularly participating in meetings with city staff.</p> <p>In 2000, Lake Stevens had about 6,300 residents and was the 12th largest city in Snohomish County. In 2014, the population was just shy of 30,000 and ranked fifth in the county. The city is planning for another 10,000 people by 2035. Much of that growth so far is coming from young families attracted by good schools and comparatively affordable housing.</p> <p>&ldquo;We see families come in, sometimes with laundry baskets to load up with books and DVDs,&rdquo; Gustafson said. &ldquo;The next week, they&rsquo;re back to return those and load up again.&rdquo;</p> <p>For the younger ones, and their parents, Storytime is the draw.</p> <p>&ldquo;We started going there because my friend from high school takes her daughter here,&rdquo; said Lindsay Johns, mother of Ava. &ldquo;She posted on Facebook and we went and its lots of fun.</p> <p>&ldquo;The movement and interaction with kids her age is always fun. We love the songs and hanging out with other babies. I feel like she can move around there.&rdquo;</p> <p>Johns said she also appreciates the expertise of the library staff: &ldquo;Monica is really great at what she does.&rdquo;</p> <p>Jackson has been a children&rsquo;s, teen and adult services librarian in school, public and college libraries. Her undergraduate degree is in Elementary Education and she received her Master of Library Science from the University of Washington. She&rsquo;s been at the Lake Stevens Library since 2011.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Sonia Gustafson,&nbsp;Managing Librarian, Lake Stevens Library, 425-334-1900, <a href="mailto:sgustafson@sno-isle.org">sgustafson@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Wed, 29 Jun 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=257 Issues That Matter forum takes emotional look at teen suicide http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=256 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Photo of Issues That Matter panelists " src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160624022945.jpg" style="float:left; height:334px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><em>Megan LaPlante, A Monroe High School student (at right) speaks during the June 23 Issues That Matter event at Snohomish Library. LaPlante, who is&nbsp;Miss Washington High School America 2016,&nbsp;has made teen suicide awareness and prevention part of her platform. Listening are fellow panelists Rena Fitzgerald,&nbsp;manager of the Crisis Chat line run by Volunteers of America Western Washington, and&nbsp;Dr. Gary Goldbaum, Health Officer and Director of the Snohomish Health District. <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/sno-isle/albums/72157670167634905">Photo gallery</a>&nbsp; #snoisleITM</em></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><strong>Issues That Matter forums</strong></p> <p>The remaining three Issues That Matter events on teen suicide are scheduled for:</p> <ul> <li>July 7, Stanwood Camano Community Resource Center, 9612 271st St. NW, Stanwood</li> <li>July 13, Rosehill Community Center, 304 Lincoln Ave., Mukilteo</li> <li>July 21, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr., Oak Harbor</li> </ul> <p>All events will start at 6:30 p.m. They are open are to the public and free, with funding provided by the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. The forums feature panels of experts and community members to discuss what can be done about teen suicide.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>An emotional and hopefully helpful evening unfolded during&nbsp;Sno-Isle Libraries&rsquo; &ldquo;Issues That Matter&rdquo; event at Snohomish Library.</p> <p>The June 23 event was the first of four public forums about the causes, scope and prevention of teen suicide in Snohomish and Island counties. Local health officials have noted an increase in teen suicides over the past several years. The Issues That Matter initiative is designed to encourage conversations on topics that impact the community.</p> <p>&ldquo;Suicide affects all ages and entire communities,&rdquo; said forum panelist Dr. Gary Goldbaum, Health Officer and Director of the Snohomish Health District. &ldquo;Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. and the suicide rate in Snohomish County is higher than the national average.&rdquo;</p> <p>A study done by the health district in 2014 showed that 20 percent of high school students in Snohomish County consider suicide.</p> <p>Goldbaum said the public-health approach to suicide is not blaming or shaming. &ldquo;Suicide is not inevitable,&rdquo; he said. &ldquo;We can, we will prevent suicides.&rdquo;</p> <p>Rena Fitzgerald, manager of the Crisis Chat line run by Volunteers of America Western Washington in Everett, debunked the idea that talking about suicide makes people suicidal. Indeed, she said, the opposite is true.</p> <p>&ldquo;We think people don&rsquo;t talk about it, but most people do talk about it,&rdquo; Fitzgerald told the capacity audience in the library&#39;s meeting room. &ldquo;They say, &lsquo;I can&rsquo;t do this anymore&rsquo; or I&rsquo;ve figured out a solution.&rsquo; You don&rsquo;t have to be a mental-health professional to help someone. Call the crisis line for advice.&rdquo;</p> <p>Megan LaPlante brought a personal perspective to the panel.</p> <p>LaPlante, a sophomore-to-be at Monroe High School, became emotional as she recounted the suicide of a friend. LaPlante, who is Miss Washington High School America 2016, has made teen suicide awareness and prevention part of her platform. LaPlante showed a video from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) called <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFVVwLERoX4">&ldquo;Talk Saves Lives.&rdquo;</a></p> <p>Audience members also became emotional as they stood to share their stories. One mother asked what can be done so, &quot;We don&#39;t have another funeral in Marysville.&rdquo; Another tearful mother said: &ldquo;I lost my son last year; he wasn&#39;t quite a teen yet. I wish I had known warning signs.&rdquo;</p> <p>Fitzgerald noted there will be an <a href="http://afsp.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&amp;eventID=4145">Out of the Darkness community walk</a> on Oct. 15 at Legion Park in Everett. Sponsored by the AFSP, the walks are intended to raise awareness and funds to help the organizations work toward its goals.</p> <p><strong>Teen suicide resources</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.islandcountywa.gov/Health/AHC/Documents/HYS2014mentalhealth.pdf" target="_blank"><strong>Island County: Youth and Mental Health</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.snohd.org/Healthy-Living/Healthy-Communities/Suicide-Prevention" target="_blank"><strong>Snohomish County Health District suicide prevention resources&nbsp;</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/"><strong>National Suicide Prevention Lifeline&nbsp;</strong></a>800-273-8255</li> <li><a href="http://www.sptsusa.org/" target="_blank"><strong>Society for the Prevention of Teen Suicide</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://scsuicideprevention.org/" target="_blank"><strong>Stanwood Camano Community Action</strong></a></li> <li><a href="https://prezi.com/aptt2_ax03ob/suicide-in-island-county/" target="_blank"><strong>Suicide in Island County: Island County Board of Health Presentation</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.thetrevorproject.org/" target="_blank"><strong>The Trevor Project</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.intheforefront.org/" target="_blank"><strong>University of Washington Forefront</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.carecrisischat.org/" target="_blank"><strong>Volunteers of America Care Crisis Chat</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://866teenlink.org/about-teen-link/" target="_blank"><strong>Washington Recovery Help Line Teen Link</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://win211.org/" target="_blank"><strong>Washington State 2-1-1</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.doh.wa.gov/YouandYourFamily/InjuryandViolencePrevention/YouthSuicidePrevention" target="_blank"><strong>Washington State Department of Health Youth Suicide Prevention</strong></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.yspp.org/" target="_blank"><strong>Washington State Youth Suicide Prevention Program</strong></a></li> </ul> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Charles Pratt,&nbsp;Managing Librarian, Stanwood&nbsp;Library and Issues That Matters chair, 360-629-3132, <a href="mailto:cpratt@sno-isle.org">cpratt@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Fri, 24 Jun 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=256 Teens can make a difference with ambassador program http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=254 <p>Sno-Isle Libraries has volunteer opportunities for 14- to 18-year-olds looking to make a difference in their communities.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s called the <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/teens/ambassador">&lsquo;Teen Ambassador&rsquo; program</a>,&rdquo; said Dawn Rutherford, teen-services coordinator for the library district. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re looking for a variety of personalities and interests, but the common denominator will be teens who want to help and communicate with others.&rdquo;</p> <p><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/teens/ambassador" target="_blank"><img alt="Teen ambassador poster" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160616095651.jpg" style="float:right; height:388px; width:300px" /></a>The program is for teens across the district, which has 21 libraries across Snohomish and Island counties. Starting in August, ambassadors would commit to volunteering at least four hours a month for the next year.</p> <p>&ldquo;Our goal is that ambassadors will bring more teen voices - their own and others&rsquo; - to our libraries,&rdquo; Rutherford said. &ldquo;Ambassadors will gain leadership and workplace skills while educating and raising awareness about library programs and resources.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Not only will ambassadors have an opportunity to help build connections in their community, but they&rsquo;ll also get a behind-the-scenes look at how the library works.&rdquo;</p> <p>Just how ambassadors bring those voices forward will depend on the skills and interests they bring to the job, said Rutherford, who had a similar experience when she was a teen. &ldquo;Teen Ambassadors may be good writers, have social-media skills, be great at video or photography, be interested in advocacy or maybe just love movies, music and books,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p>For those thinking about going on to college, this kind of experience may be beneficial. According to the College Board, which sponsors the Advanced Placement (AP) program and administers the SAT and other standardized tests, extracurricular experience on an application adds information for college admissions screeners to consider.</p> <p>The <a href="http://sno-isle.org/teens/ambassador">Teen Ambassador-program application</a> process includes:</p> <ul> <li>Applications due June 30, 2016.</li> <li>Interviews in July.</li> <li>Training in August.</li> <li>Teen Ambassador work begins in September.</li> </ul> <p>&ldquo;Teen Ambassadors may report on library events, create reviews, post on social media and blogs and generally represent the library in a friendly professional manner,&rdquo; Rutherford said. &ldquo;Sno-Isle Libraries already has a number of ways teens can get involved, including our video bloggers, or &lsquo;vloggers,&rsquo; and the Teen Explore Summer. Teen Ambassadors is another way for teens to make their voice heard.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves more than 713,000 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Dawn Rutherford, teen-services coordinator, 360-651-7069, <a href="mailto:drutherford@sno-isle.org">drutherford@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, public information manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Thu, 16 Jun 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=254 Snohomish Library has carpet project covered http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=253 <table align="center" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width:800px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Photo of worn carpeting at Snohomish Library" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160614121722.jpg" style="float:left; height:334px; width:800px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>The carpeting at Snohomish Library is showing signs of wear after 13 years.</em> <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskyh6ukd">Photo gallery</a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/locations/snohomish/">Snohomish Library</a> is going to shrink for a month this summer.</p> <p>&ldquo;We need to replace the carpeting and some flooring in the library,&rdquo; Darlene Weber, former managing librarian at the Snohomish Library,&nbsp;said. Weber recently took the same position at the Mill Creek Library.&nbsp;Jude Anderson became managing librarian at Snohomish as of July 1.&nbsp;&ldquo;It&rsquo;s a big job that requires closing the main part of the building. The good news is that we&rsquo;re going to turn the meeting room into a mini-version of the library so that our customers can still access many of the materials and services they want and need.&rdquo;</p> <table align="right" border="1" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="0" style="width:350px"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><strong>The book on August library service</strong></p> <ul> <li>The main area of the Snohomish Library building will be closed Aug. 7-Sept. 5 for a carpeting and flooring project.</li> <li>The meeting room, lobby and restrooms will not be available for general public use from Aug. 7-Sept. 5.</li> <li>From Aug. 8-31, limited library services will be available in the building&rsquo;s meeting room from 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Mondays-Saturdays and 1-5 p.m. on Sundays.</li> <li>There will be no library service from Sept. 1-5&nbsp;</li> <li>The main library and all other areas will repoen with full services on Tuesday, Sept. 6.</li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The main library will be closed from Aug. 7 &ndash;Sept. 5. During that time, there will be no public access to the main library, the entrance area and the restrooms.</p> <p>&ldquo;We will be able to provide limited library service during the closure,&rdquo; Weber said. &ldquo;Customers can come to the outside entrance of the meeting room to pick up items on hold, turn in &lsquo;Explore Summer&rsquo; logs and get prizes and take care of issues related to their accounts.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;We also hope to have some small collections for people to browse, especially for children, so come visit us!&rdquo;</p> <p>Weber said that, unfortunately, the limited space in the meeting room will make it not possible to provide some services, including access to public computers and normal programs and events. And, Weber said, since the meeting room is being used as the mini-library, it won&rsquo;t be available for other public uses and reservations.</p> <p>&ldquo;While we won&rsquo;t have computers available, the Wi-Fi will be on and accessible to those outside and with their own devices,&rdquo; Weber said.</p> <p>Most of the carpet and flooring in the 23,000-square-foot library is original to when it was built in 2003. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re really excited about this major update and replacement of worn out carpet and flooring,&rdquo; Weber said.</p> <p>The ongoing maintenance work is just part of what facilities manager Brian Rush has brought to the Snohomish facility in recent years. Energy efficiency upgrades mean that in 2015, the building used 17 percent less electricity and 70 percent less natural gas than in 2011.</p> <p>&ldquo;This is a standard replacement and update cycle of carpeting for us. After 13 years of use in a public space we would expect to be replacing the carpet,&rdquo; Rush said. &ldquo;We want to keep this building looking great, and this kind of routine, proactive maintenance is a part of doing that.&rdquo;</p> <p>For those who want or need to use a full-service facility during the closure, she suggests Snohomish customers look toward the Monroe or Marysville libraries. &ldquo;If someone would like to get set up to use another location during the closure, we&rsquo;d be happy to help, especially for public computing,&rdquo; Weber said.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <ul> <li>Jude Anderson, Managing Librarian, Snohomish Library, 360-651-4020, <a href="mailto:janderson@sno-isle.org">janderson</a><a href="mailto:dweber@sno-isle.org">@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Chy Ross, District Manager, Community Libraries, 360-651-7015, <a href="mailto:cross@sno-isle.org">cross@sno-isle.org</a></li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a></li> </ul> Tue, 14 Jun 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=253 Four forums to tackle tough issue of teen suicide http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=252 <p>Teen suicide is a dark issue, one that can be difficult for family members and loved ones to comprehend. It&rsquo;s also a problem that experts say can shrink when light is shined upon it.</p> <p><img alt="teen suicide forums post" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160601112947.jpg" style="float:right; height:352px; line-height:22.4px; margin:5px; width:500px" /></p> <p>Shining a light is what Sno-Isle Libraries hopes to do in hosting a series of four public forums about the causes, scope and prevention of teen suicide in Snohomish and Island counties. The events are part of Sno-Isle Libraries&#39; &ldquo;<a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/issues-that-matter">Issues That Matter</a>&rdquo; initiative designed to encourage conversations on topics that impact the community. The events are scheduled for:</p> <ul> <li>June 23, Snohomish Library, 311 Maple Ave., Snohomish</li> <li>July 7, Stanwood Camano Community Resource Center, 9612 271st St. NW, Stanwood</li> <li>July 13, Rosehill Community Center, 304 Lincoln Ave., Mukilteo</li> <li>July 21, Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Dr., Oak Harbor</li> </ul> <p>All events will start at 6:30 p.m. They are open are to the public and free, with funding provided by the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. The forums will feature panels&nbsp;of experts and community members to discuss what can be done about teen suicide.</p> <p>One of those panelists will be Rena Fitzgerald, program manager for Care Crisis Chat run by Volunteers of America &ndash; Western Washington. &ldquo;The suicide rate in Snohomish County is just about the highest it&rsquo;s ever been. It&rsquo;s more than a public health problem, it&rsquo;s a crisis,&rdquo; Fitzgerald said earlier this year.</p> <p>Another participant will be Dr. Gary Goldbaum, health officer for the Snohomish Health District. In June 2015, the Snohomish Health District released figures showing 13 young people had taken their own lives since September, 2014, more than double the annual number of previous years.</p> <p>A 2014 survey of 11,852, sixth-, eighth-, 10th- and 12th-graders in Snohomish County found significant numbers of students &ndash; from 16-21 percent depending on grade level &ndash; had seriously considered suicide. Nearly one in five surveyed students reported they did not have a parent or trusted adult that they feel comfortable confiding in for asking for help.</p> <p>The health district has sent out fliers to school districts on what resources are available to help. The crisis line managed by Fitzgerald is open to people of all ages, but about half of the users are younger than 25.</p> <p>Suicide prevention &ndash; for both youth and adults &ndash; was one of the top three issues of Snohomish County identified in the Community Health Improvement Plan. The plan aims to reduce the rate of suicide in Snohomish County from 14.6 per 100,000 to 10.2 per 100,000 by 2020.</p> <p>Charlene Ray, Island County Mental Health clinical supervisor, will be participating at the Oak Harbor event on July 21. Island County Human Services provides a variety of mental health services including a school-based program in all four school districts of Island County; Oak Harbor, Coupeville, South Whidbey and Camano/Stanwood. Suicide prevention is among the concerns addressed by the program.</p> <p>More information about the forums, along with library resources addressing the topic, is available online at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/issues-that-matter">sno-isle.org/issues-that-matter.</a></p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong><br /> Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 01 Jun 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=252 Get ready to 'Explore Summer' with Sno-Isle Libraries http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=251 <p>Think summer reading is lazing under a tree as a warm breeze turns the pages for you?</p> <p>Well, could be, but the Sno-Isle Libraries, &ldquo;Explore Summer &ndash; Read, Learn Discover&rdquo; program is aimed at youth from tiny to teens and has something more competitive, energetic and probably louder in store.</p> <p><img alt="Explore Summer graphic" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160526024038.jpg" style="float:right; height:178px; width:500px" />&ldquo;While children and teens of all ages are welcome to participate in &rsquo;Explore Summer, it is designed to better prepare students when they return to school in the fall by battling the summer slide&rdquo; said Leslie Moore, youth and outreach services manager for Sno-Isle Libraries. &ldquo;We have a really full lineup of events, activities and library materials to keep kids engaged, entertained, and learning while having fun.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Explore Summer,&rdquo; which runs from June 1-Aug. 31, may just make students smarter, too.</p> <p>Educators from school districts across Snohomish and Island counties say that summer programs such as &ldquo;Explore Summer &ndash; Read, Learn Discover&rdquo; can improve a student&rsquo;s performance when they go back to school in the fall. School officials supporting Sno-Isle Libraries&rsquo; program include:</p> <ul> <li>Edmonds School District Library and Instructional Technology Coordinator Marianne Costello</li> <li>Everett School District Associate Superintendent of Teaching and Learning Joyce Stewart</li> <li>Lakewood School District Director of Teaching and Learning Melissa VanZanten</li> <li>Mukilteo School District Assistant Superintendent Alison Brynelson</li> <li>Oak Harbor School District Special Programs Director Janice Gaare</li> <li>Sultan School District Superintendent Dan Chaplik</li> </ul> <p>&ldquo;Explore Summer&rdquo; challenges participants to become bronze-, silver- and gold-medal readers. The program includes reading logs for kids and teens that are available at any Sno-Isle library or can be printed at home by going to <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/explore-summer">www.sno-isle.org/explore-summer</a>. Gaining each level and other milestones will make participants eligible for prizes awarded at each library.</p> <p>In addition, children can earn extra badges in <a href="http://sno-isle.org/beanstack">Beanstack</a>. Beanstack is a personalized online service designed for families with young readers discover books, activities, apps and other items that matched to your child&#39;s age and interests.</p> <p>&nbsp;Yes, &ldquo;Explore Summer&rdquo; definitely includes reading, but there is more.</p> <p>&ldquo;The Sarvey Wildlife Center is bringing their &lsquo;Birds of Prey&rsquo; show to several libraries, we&rsquo;ve got bands playing, magicians, the Pacific Science Center, the &lsquo;Noiseguy&rsquo; &hellip; a whole summer of some pretty exciting and fun activities scheduled across our libraries,&rdquo; Moore said.</p> <p>The &ldquo;Explore Summer&rdquo; program addresses a number of the Sno-Isle Libraries strategic goals, including literacy and learning, community and culture, free and equal access and championing early literacy.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information, contact: </strong></p> <p>Leslie Moore, Youth and Outreach Services Manager, 360-651-7055, <a href="mailto:lmoore@sno-isle.org">lmoore@sno-isle.org</a></p> <p>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Thu, 26 May 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=251 Dedication of library friends results in dedication of art http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=249 <p>It was a long time coming, but on Saturday, May 21, a dedicated group from Friends of the Camano Island Library were joined by their friends and supporters for an art dedication event at the library.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="John Ebner and Ryan Jansen with Islnaders sculture" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160524092120.jpg" style="height:392px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><em>John Ebner (left) and Ryan Jansen stand with their art piece &quot;Islanders&quot; following a May 21, 2016 dedication event at Camano Island Library. Ebner conceived of&nbsp;the sculpture and Jansen fabricated it at the Stanwood High School welding shop. <a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskAnQ794">More photos</a></em></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Officially installed and accepted as permanent art displays were:</p> <p>&quot;Wonders and Curiosities on Every Shelf,&quot; a 14-foot by 2-foot, mixed-media mural printed digitally on aluminum by Danny Koffman.</p> <p>&ldquo;Brown, Matsui, and Levi Strauss,&rdquo; by Duane Simshauser includes metal plates, hardware cloth, jeans, branches, concert tickets, acrylic on wood panels.</p> <p>&quot;Islanders,&quot; a steel sculpture conceptualized by John Ebner and fabricated by Ryan Jansen.</p> <p>The event included a reception to meet the three local artists, followed by opening remarks by Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, executive director of Sno-Isle Libraries, then the presentation of the three art pieces, followed by comments by Connie Hall, co-chair of the Camano Library Fundraising Committee and then closing comments by Woolf-Ivory.</p> <p>The Camano Island Library began as a pilot project in 2006. The economic downturn and other factors turned the intended three-year timeframe into an eight-year odyssey that resulted in the opening of the new library in August, 2015.</p> <p>Norma Mouton, chair of the Friends of Camano Island Library Art Committee, said art was always part of the plan and more is on the way. &ldquo;We decided on five pieces and ended up with seven,&rdquo; Mouton said prior to Saturday&rsquo;s ceremony. &ldquo;These are just the first three.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong><br /> Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</p> Tue, 24 May 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=249 Survey asks library customers about technology use http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=250 <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is asking its customers to share how they use and value various library technology services.</p> <p><a href="https://impactsurvey.org/branch-select/yit710/203777" target="_blank"><img alt="Impact Survey graphic" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160524024434.jpg" style="border-style:solid; border-width:0px; float:right; height:146px; width:500px" /></a>From May 23-June 12, <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/impactsurvey">an online survey</a> will be open to ask library customers how they use and benefit from technology and related services at their library. Called the Impact Survey, it is an ongoing national research project created by the University of Washington Information School with support from the Bill &amp; Melinda Gates Foundation.</p> <p>This is the second time Sno-Isle Libraries has offered the survey to customers. In 2014, library district officials used the information from the survey to inform and adjust services such as public computers, wireless internet access, online resources and digital literacy training.</p> <p>Anne Murphy, lead librarian for public computing, said the 2014 results were informative and some have been put to work.</p> <p>&ldquo;We learned that our services such as internet access and printing are valuable, even to those with access at home,&rdquo; Murphy said. &ldquo;We also learned that staff assistance on the computers is frequently requested and highly valued by our customers.&rdquo;</p> <p>Murphy said that information resulted in added staff training to help ensure even service levels across the district&rsquo;s 21 libraries.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want every customer that walks through our doors to receive the same high quality level of assistance with technology,&rdquo; Murphy said. &ldquo;To date, 42 information services staff members have received training about teaching technology classes, and many have already taught classes in their branches.&rdquo;</p> <p>More training will be on the way later this year with the development of curriculum around the most popular devices and electronic resources used by Sno-Isle Libraries customers, Murphy said.</p> <p>The plan is to offer the survey every two years.</p> <p>&ldquo;We want to learn if the changes we make are effective,&rdquo; said Christa Werle, public services project manager. &ldquo;We want to stay close to our communities and learn how customers&rsquo; needs are evolving.&rdquo;</p> <p>The survey results from Sno-Isle customers also help inform <a href="https://impactsurvey.org/sites/impactsurvey.org/files/cumulative_report.pdf">the national study</a>. Since October, 2013, 71,239 library customers from 1,167 libraries across the U.S. have taken the survey.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <p>Anne Murphy, Lead Librarian - Public Computing, 360-651-6035,&nbsp;AMurphy@sno-isle.org</p> <p>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 24 May 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=250 Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation gets statewide award http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=247 <p>The <a href="http://sno-islefoundation.org/">Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation</a> has received the 2016 <a href="http://www.wla.org/">Washington Library Association</a> Foundation Merit Award.</p> <p><img alt="Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation logo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160518092724.jpg" style="float:right; height:137px; width:350px" />&ldquo;The foundation is a strong supporter of our efforts to serve our communities and customers,&rdquo; Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;The foundation enhances programming aimed at early literacy, multicultural understanding, staff development and community involvement. The foundation has been a strong advocate for public libraries since its formation.&rdquo;</p> <p>The award was presented in April during the state library association&rsquo;s 2016 conference in Spokane.</p> <p>Three very visible examples of recent foundation support include the TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2015 event, the increasingly popular annual Third Grade Reading Challenge and just this past month, the Trudy Sundberg Lecture Series.</p> <p>TEDxSnoIsleLibraries was the first TEDx event in Snohomish County. At the Edmonds Center for the Arts, the day-long series was an unqualified success. TEDxSnoIsleLibraries could not have happened without the support and trust from the foundation&rsquo;s Directors. The foundation&rsquo;s initial $20,000 pledge encouraged 22 community partners to jump on board, which resulted in over $80,000 of regional support for the effort.</p> <p><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/tedx/">TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016</a> is scheduled for Nov. 18, again at Edmonds Center for the Arts.</p> <p><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=235">The reading challenge</a>, officially known as &ldquo;The Sno-Isle Libraries Mega-Fun, Biblio-Trivia, Rockem-Sockem Third Grade Reading Challenge,&rdquo; began seven years ago with just two schools on Whidbey Island. This year, the program involved had 46 schools and 192 teams with 1,312 students participating. The foundation&rsquo;s support helps prepare the next generation of readers to become the literate leaders of tomorrow.</p> <p><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=241">The Trudy Sundberg Lecture Series</a> was three years in the making, fundraising in honor of the former Whidbey Island educator and activist. The two inaugural lectures earlier this month by Pulitzer Prize winner Hedrick Smith drew overflow crowds.</p> <p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m just so pleased to be able to support an organization such as Sno-Isle Libraries,&rdquo; said Paul Pitkin, the foundation&rsquo;s executive director. &ldquo;We have great people supporting a great mission.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation</strong></p> <p>The Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation provides a way for people to help their community libraries through private donations, enabling excellence beyond what is possible through public funds alone.&nbsp;Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation is a public, tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization registered with the U.S.&nbsp;Internal Revenue Service and the <a href="http://www.sos.wa.gov/charities/search_detail.aspx?charity_id=25040">state of Washington</a>.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information</strong></p> <p>Paul Pitkin, Foundation Executive Director, 360-651-7092, ppitkin@sno-isle.org<br /> Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org<br /> &nbsp;</p> Wed, 18 May 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=247 Camano Island Library project garners design award http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=248 <table align="left" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width:850px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Camano Island Library photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160518044640.jpg" style="float:left; height:387px; width:850px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><em>The Camano Island Library is a striking addition to the Camano Commons project at Terry&#39;s Corner on Camano Island.&nbsp;<a href="https://flic.kr/s/aHskA6Ctoi">Photo gallery&nbsp;</a></em></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Camano Island Library staff members are getting used to hearing customers&rsquo; verbal votes of approval about their building:</p> <p>&ldquo;Ooh, what a nice library!&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Aah, what a pleasant space.&rdquo;</p> <p>And now, it&rsquo;s official. The Camano Island Library is an award-winning design.</p> <table align="right" border="1" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" style="width:450px"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <h3><strong>Library art dedication set for Saturday, May 21</strong></h3> <p>From the beginning, art was part of the design for the Camano Island Library and on Saturday afternoon, May 21, work by three local artists will dedicated for permanent display at the library.</p> <p>The event is scheduled for 2-4 p.m. at the Camano Island&nbsp;Library, 848 N. Sunrise Blvd., Camano Island, WA 98282.</p> <p>&nbsp;&ldquo;When the library moved to the new location, we decided we needed permanent art as part of the d&eacute;cor,&rdquo; said Norma Mouton, chair of the Friends of Camano Island Library Art Committee. &ldquo;We worked with the architect to determine where (the art would be located).&rdquo;</p> <p>Art works to be dedicated on Saturday are:</p> <ul> <li>&quot;Wonders and Curiosities on Every Shelf,&quot; a 14-foot by 2-foot, mixed-media mural printed digitally on aluminum by Danny Koffman.</li> <li>&ldquo;Brown, Matsui, and Levi Strauss,&rdquo; by Duane Simshauser includes metal plates, hardware cloth, jeans, branches, concert tickets, acrylic on wood panels.</li> <li>&quot;Islanders,&quot; a steel sculpture conceptualized by John Ebner and fabricated by Ryan Jansen.</li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The <a href="http://www.nwaia.org">AIA Northwest Washington</a> chapter of the American Institute of Architects has honored architect Dan Nelson of Stanwood-based Designs Northwest, Stig Carlson of Stig Carlson Architecture in Coupeville, general contractor Kirtley Cole Construction of Everett and Sno-Isle Libraries with a Citation Award for their collective work in turning a former restaurant into a library.</p> <p>The honor was bestowed May 5 at the group&rsquo;s annual awards dinner in Bellingham. The awards celebrate projects that represent the finest standards in sustainability, innovation, building performance and overall integration with the client and surrounding community. Architects based in Whatcom, Skagit, San Juan and Island counties are eligible for consideration.</p> <p>&ldquo;I think the award is recognition that we took an existing structure and turned that into a focal point and an asset for the community,&rdquo; Nelson said. &ldquo;The award criteria included social enhancement and community involvement. There was really good community input, a lot of public meetings and working closely with Camano Islanders.&rdquo;</p> <p>The process for a Camano Island Library began in December, 2006, when the Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees approved a pilot library project. Six months later a temporary facility opened in a storefront at Terry&rsquo;s Corner. With voter approval of funding, work began in 2014 on the then-empty Islanders Restaurant, also at Terry&rsquo;s Corner in Camano Commons, and the new library opened in August, 2015.</p> <p>&ldquo;We had a good working relationship with Dan at Designs Northwest, Stig Carlson and everyone on the project,&rdquo; said Jeanne Crisp, Director of Facilities and Special Projects for Sno-Isle Libraries.</p> <p>It helped, Nelson said, that his firm was familiar with the site.</p> <p>&ldquo;We did the initial concept for Camano Commons and the schematic for the restaurant that the library eventually became,&rdquo; Nelson said. &ldquo;&rdquo;Then, Stig came together with Designs Northwest to work on the library. There were challenges in turning a facility that had been a restaurant into a library, but it helped the functionality to add approximately 900 square feet on to the original structure.&rdquo;</p> <p>By all accounts, the customers, community and the library district are happy with the now award-winning result.</p> <p>&ldquo;The support of the community meant we can provide what they had asked for: adequate library space for children&rsquo;s activities; a larger selection of popular books, movie and music titles; as well as more space and public computers for research, school assignments and comfortable browsing,&rdquo; Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director said. &ldquo;A permanent library on Camano Island enables Sno-Isle Libraries to continue to focus on building literate, economically sound and connected communities.&rdquo;</p> <p>Other firms involved in the project include structural engineering by Lund Opsahl of Seattle, interior design by H2K Design of Stanwood, mechanical &nbsp;consultant RICE Group of Lynnwood and electrical by Case Engineering of Bothell. Jayme Zold and Kim Williams were the project architects from Designs Northwest Architects who also worked on the project.</p> Wed, 18 May 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=248 Sno-Isle Libraries seeks input on Draft Capital Facilities Plan http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=246 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:350px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="hashtag image" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160511045051.jpg" style="height:124px; line-height:22.4px; width:350px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is a tax-supported library district serving Snohomish and Island counties. The mission is to be a community doorway to reading, resources and lifelong learning, and a center for people, ideas and culture. Policy is set by a seven-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners.</p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries provides a network of public library services to more than 713,000 residents across approximately 2,200 square miles. The population within the library district is projected to increase by 14 percent by 2025, with some areas growing at a much higher rate.</p> <p>Library services and materials are delivered through 21 facilities in 21 cities, towns and communities; through mobile library services and online. Eight of the 21 community libraries are owned by the library district. The library district owns the Service Center, an administrative and distribution facility in Marysville which supports library operations across the district. Twelve facilities are owned and maintained by individual cities and towns. One facility is owned by a local Friends of the Library group.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries is planning how its facilities will meet the changing needs of communities and customers now and in the future.</p> <p>A Draft Capital Facilities Plan available now for review includes proposed recommendations for all 21 of the libraries across the library district plus the service center in Marysville. The draft plan recommendations are informed by work that began in the fall of 2015 by library-district officials and consultants and included an extensive public input campaign</p> <p>Before finalizing a plan, Sno-Isle Libraries officials are checking with communities to see if they got it right.</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re taking a fresh look at our facilities and how our customers and communities are using them,&rdquo; Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. &ldquo;We listened to our communities, customers and partners. We looked at how customers have been using their libraries, as well as national trends in libraries and technology.</p> <p>&ldquo;We think we&rsquo;ve got a plan that can guide our decisions over the next 10 years, but we want to ask for feedback before moving ahead.&rdquo;</p> <p>The draft plan is posted online at <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/facplan">www.sno-isle.org/facplan</a>&nbsp;along with a link to an <a href="http://mysnoislelibrary.publicmeeting.info/">online survey that is open for public comment</a>. The survey is open through June 3. In addition, each library will have information about the draft plan for review and library-district staff are taking the information to city councils, community groups and other public gatherings.</p> <p>The draft plan includes recommendations to add services in three areas that currently have inadequate library service, including the Lakewood/Smokey Point area, the 128th Street area southeast of Paine Field and west of I-5 and the area east and south of the current Mill Creek Library.</p> <p>Three current libraries are identified for replacement with larger facilities in Lake Stevens, Stanwood and Lynnwood. Renovation and/or expansion is proposed for the current libraries in Arlington and Mill Creek. The rest of the libraries in the district plus the service center, 14 facilities in all, are identified in the draft plan as able to meet current and predicted demands.</p> <p>&ldquo;As population and use has grown, some of our libraries are now undersized for their service areas. The need for new buildings is already being discussed in cities such as Lake Stevens and Mill Creek,&rdquo; Director of Facilities Jeanne Crisp said. &ldquo;In other places, remodels or additions are called for. And, some existing facilities as well as our newer libraries are well-suited for their communities -so we don&rsquo;t anticipate any substantive changes in the next 10 years.&rdquo;</p> <p>Population growth is adding fuel to the need for new or expanded libraries in growing areas, Crisp said.</p> <p>&ldquo;Some areas of the library district are among the fastest growing in the U.S.,&rdquo; Crisp said. &ldquo;In some cases, that growth is coming to formerly rural areas. In others, unincorporated suburban areas are filling in as well as cities seeing significant growth.&rdquo;</p> <p>Besides the sheer number of people to serve, Sno-Isle Libraries and libraries across the country are seeing changes in how customers use services and the buildings which provide them. To help inform the capital facilities plan, plan, library project staff worked with design consultant Margaret Sullivan Studios to take a big-picture look at the future of library facilities. The idea is to create conditions that facilitate library activities that are timeless, even though technologies may change.</p> <p>For example, Crisp said, many customers want access to computers, printers, wi-fi, maker-spaces and other technology. Meeting and study spaces are in increasing demand as well as small-business support centers. Also, while print books and DVDs are the most used materials, the popularity of downloadable items such as eBooks, audiobooks and movies is rapidly growing.</p> <p>&ldquo;This is a plan for our facilities, but it also aligns with our Strategic Plan which guides the services, programs and strategic priorities of the library district,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p>Crisp said the survey results will be compiled with the assistance of the Seattle-based consulting firm, EnviroIssues. &ldquo;They helped with the outreach effort last fall and we&rsquo;re fortunate to have them assist this time, too,&rdquo; Crisp said.</p> <p>Once all of the feedback is gathered and reviewed, library-district officials will determine if adjustments to the draft plan are needed. The goal is approval and adoption by the Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees in mid- to late summer.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong><br /> Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information, contact:&nbsp;</strong><br /> Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org<br /> Jeanne Crisp, Director Facilities and Technical Services, 360-651-7068, &nbsp;jcrisp@sno-isle.org</p> Wed, 11 May 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=246 Camano Island Library art dedication set for May 21 http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=245 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="5" cellspacing="5" style="width:500px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Camano library art photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160506094950.jpg " style="height:284px; width:500px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>&quot;Wonders and Curiosities on Every Shelf&quot; by Danny Koffman will be dedicated on May 21 at the Camano Island Library.</em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The vibrant and active local arts community has been working hard to support the Camano Island Library.</p> <p>The results of those efforts will be on permanent display starting May 21 at a dedication event for works from three local artists. The event is scheduled for 2-4 p.m. at the Camano Island&nbsp;Library, 848 N. Sunrise Blvd., Camano Island, WA 98282.</p> <p>&ldquo;When the library moved to the new location, we decided we needed permanent art as part of the d&eacute;cor,&rdquo; said Norma Mouton, chair of the Friends of Camano Island Library Art Committee. &ldquo;We worked with the architect to determine where (the art would be located).</p> <p>&ldquo;We decided on five pieces and we ended up with seven.&rdquo;</p> <p>While not all of it is ready yet, pieces from three artists will be dedicated at the May 21 ceremony, including:</p> <p><strong>&quot;Wonders and Curiosities on Every Shelf&quot; </strong></p> <p>By Danny Koffman, the mixed media artwork printed digitally on aluminum depicts three surprised and amazed children as book subjects come to life on the shelf. The 14-foot by 2-foot mural is installed in the reading room. The artwork is donated to the library by Gay and Oren Campbell in memory of their son Drew Campbell.</p> <p><strong>&ldquo;Brown, Matsui, and Levi Strauss&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>Donated by the artist, Duane Simshauser, in memory of Julie Simshauser, this piece includes metal plates, hardware cloth, jeans, branches, concert tickets, acrylic on wood panels. The artwork is installed in the teen area of the library.</p> <p><strong>&quot;Islanders&quot;</strong></p> <p>With the design concept from John Ebner, this steel sculpture was fabricated by Ryan Jansen of Stanwood High School Welding Shop. The pieces are flat steel and banded with one inch steel trim and powder coated. The installation is outside on the north side of the library.</p> <p>The background of the artists and the committee members illustrate the library&rsquo;s strong connections to art and the community.</p> <p>Mouton is a watercolorist who came to Camano four years ago, she said. &ldquo;Shortly after I arrived, I found out about the library project,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;It made me more interested in my own art and became a way to meet more people.&rdquo;</p> <p>For Danny Koffman, the library project is close to his heart and his gallery.</p> <p>&ldquo;The idea for the piece is that the three children are responding to what they are seeing on the shelf,&rdquo; said Koffman, who came to Camano 10 years ago after owning a gallery Monterey, Calif. &ldquo;The titles on the book spines are coming alive and in the background is Port Susan and Mount Rainier.&rdquo;</p> <p>Koffman said the concept for the work &ldquo;came to me immediately&rdquo; as an outgrowth of his work with children at local schools. &ldquo;I just want people to smile as they look at the shelves,&rdquo; he said.</p> <p>Mouton said the May 21 dedication event at the library is scheduled to include remarks by Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, the artists and others connected to the project.</p> <p>With Mouton as chair, the Camano Library Art Committee includes community members Gay Campbell, Ann Barbas, Barbara Scott and Tamara Drake plus branch manager David Menard and district manager Becky Bolte.</p> <p>The Camano Art Fundraising committee includes Rose Olson, a member of both the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation and Sno-Libraries Board of Trustees; Jackie DeFazio, a former Sno-Isle Libraries trustee; and Connie Hall, a member of the Friends fundraising committee and lead planner on unveiling ceremonies.</p> <p>&ldquo;The level of commitment to our community is impressive,&rdquo; Mouton said.</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/" style="color: rgb(7, 130, 193);">Sno-Isle Libraries</a> serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information, contact:</strong>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Jim Hills, Public Communications Manager, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org" style="color: rgb(7, 130, 193);">jhills@sno-isle.org</a>, 360-651-7050</p> Thu, 05 May 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=245 Call to artist for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=244 <p><img alt="call to artist logo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160504115230.jpg " style="float:right; height:300px; margin:5px; width:300px" />TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016 is all about showcasing inspirational and innovative ideas from the region and now, in partnership with the Snohomish County Arts Commission, there is an opportunity to do the same for art.</p> <p>The arts commission has issued a <a href="http://cdn1.assets.sites.launchrocketship.com/c402bd7b-cd60-40bf-81d6-457c1d660a36/files/c0be9c67-e96d-4055-b6b8-1e9a58c47214/tedx_call_to_artist_2016.pdf">call-to-artist</a> to create or provide a temporary interactive-based work of art, or performance art experience, to be included as part of the TEDxSnoIsleLibraries main event, scheduled for Nov. 18, 2016 at the Edmonds Center for the Arts. The deadline for submissions is June 6 for a project that includes a $3,500 budget.</p> <p>The theme for <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/tedx/">TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016</a> is &ldquo;Transformations&rdquo; which should be the inspiration for the installation.</p> <p>&ldquo;The <a href="http://www.snohomishcountyarts.org/">Snohomish County Arts Commission</a> is pleased to select and commission an artist to develop an interactive artwork for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries again in 2016,&rdquo; said Robert Fairfax, Chair of the Snohomish County Arts Commission.&nbsp; &ldquo;We&rsquo;re fortunate to have this wonderfully executed, well-attended platform to connect artistic talent to our broad Snohomish County community.&rdquo;</p> <p>Sparked by the celebrated TED conferences worldwide, TEDxSnoIsleLibraries is a locally organized event featuring over a dozen talks, demonstrations and performances under 18 minutes each. The day-long program will harness the spirit of TED&#39;s mission, &quot;ideas worth spreading&quot; and focus on the rich innovation, invention and cultural depth of our region.</p> <p>&ldquo;The presence of art at last year&rsquo;s TEDxSnoIsleLibraries event showed the perfect symmetry of ideas and beauty,&rdquo; says Terry Lippincott, president of the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation Board of Directors. &ldquo;We are excited that the Snohomish Arts Commission is working to make art available again for attendees of the 2016 TEDx event.&rdquo;</p> <p>The public installation/performance of the project will take place throughout the day of the event within a space identified as the TEDx IdeaLab. This space will be in the gymnasium of the Edmonds Center for the Arts. An exceptional submission would propose an original, bold and creative concept that is designed to engage a large audience as they enter and exit the IdeaLab, either of a large scale or interactive or kinetic in nature. The selected artist will be paid $3,500 to complete the installation.</p> <p>For an artist prospectus:</p> <ul> <li>Office of Economic Development, 3000 Rockefeller Ave., M/S #411, Everett, WA, 98201</li> <li>425-388-3186</li> <li><a href="http://www.snocoarts.org">www.snocoarts.org</a></li> </ul> <p>Information:</p> <ul> <li>Wendy Poischbeg, Snohomish County Economic and Cultural Development Manager, <a href="mailto:Wendy.Poischbeg@Snoco.org">Wendy.Poischbeg@Snoco.org</a>, 425-388-3186</li> <li>Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org">jhills@sno-isle.org</a>, 360-651-7050</li> </ul> Wed, 04 May 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=244 Filmmakers flood Stanwood Library on rainy weekend http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=242 <p>The Stanwood Library is about to get its 253 seconds of fame.</p> <p>A rainy weekend, a kind librarian and a cast of creative educators were all in the script that will put the library up on the silver screen May 6 at Tacoma&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.grandcinema.com/253-short-film-party/">Grand Cinema 253 Short Film Party</a>.</p> <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="10" cellspacing="0" style="width:350px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Filmmakers photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160428010930.jpg " style="height:263px; width:350px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>The cast and crew of &quot;How I Did It&quot; at work in the Stanwood Library on April 23.</em></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p><strong>On film</strong></p> <ul> <li> <p>&ldquo;How I Did It&rdquo; and 30 other entries will be shown at The 253 Short Film Party, 7 p.m., Friday, May 6 at Urban Grace Church, 902 Market St., Tacoma</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://youtu.be/mPcGbVUB_KY">&ldquo;How I Did It&rdquo; trailer</a></p> </li> <li> <p>The 253 Short Film Competition winners from 2015 can be seen at <a href="http://www.youtube.com/GrandCinemaTacoma">www.youtube.com/GrandCinemaTacoma</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Interested in filming your own project in a Sno-Isle Libraries facility? Contact the <a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/locations/">local library building manager</a> for details.</p> </li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&ldquo;It all started about five years ago,&rdquo; said Lance Cadena, who married into his wife&rsquo;s family cabin on Camano Island&rsquo;s Juniper Beach. The cabin became the site of an annual spring getaway for a Cadena, a Tacoma School District educator, and a group of fellow teachers and librarians from across the Puget Sound region.</p> <p>&ldquo;We used to bring our cameras and shoot photos during the weekend,&rdquo; Cadena said. &ldquo;Then, we saw that this film festival is the same weekend and said, &lsquo;Let&rsquo;s do a movie!&rsquo;&rdquo;</p> <p>The 253 Film Competition is a quick-turnaround event, perfect for the group&rsquo;s weekend plans. The rules are that the films can be no more than 253 seconds long, must include references to a list of &ldquo;mystery items&rdquo; that change each year and must be completed in just 72 hours.</p> <p>The group calls itself Too Many Cooks Productions and their entry this year is titled &ldquo;How I Did It,&rdquo; an amusing look into the dream of making it big. The mystery items that all entries must include are a dialog line &ldquo;That&rsquo;s all she wrote,&rdquo; an allergy, a toothbrush and a Tacoma business.</p> <p>The library&rsquo;s turn in front of the camera came in a book-signing scene with the help of group member Indie Berg, a Tacoma schools librarian.</p> <p>&ldquo;It was raining like crazy,&rdquo; said Cadena, which washed out some anticipated locations. The library looked like a good and dry option. &ldquo;Indie is a librarian so she says, &lsquo;I&rsquo;ll just go ask.&rdquo; They said &lsquo;yes&rsquo; and we started shooting.&rdquo;</p> <p>Berg said the library staff was very helpful. &ldquo;When I asked and told them what wanted to do, they were just so accommodating,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p>Cadena said the crew for the weekend film-shoot is growing. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve gotten so big that we now rent a house in addition to using the cabin,&rdquo; he said, adding that the effort is starting to have local economic impact.</p> <p>Still, the weekend getaway is all about having fun, Berg said.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s like a 72-hour summer camp,&rdquo; Berg said. &ldquo;We&rsquo;re all in charge of a meal. We bring our cameras and props and whatever we can scrounge up. Everybody brings sleeping bags, but we don&rsquo;t get much sleep.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>About Sno-Isle Libraries</strong></p> <p>Sno-Isle Libraries serves 713,835 residents in Washington&rsquo;s Snohomish and Island counties through 21 community libraries, online services, and Library on Wheels.</p> <p><strong>For more information, contact:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </strong></p> <p>Jim Hills, Public Communications Manager, jhills@sno-isle.org, 360-651-7050</p> Thu, 28 Apr 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=242 TEDx Salon set for May 10 at Edmonds CC http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=243 <table align="right" border="0" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="10" style="width:400px"> <tbody> <tr> <td><img alt="Matt Cail photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160428023718.jpg " style="height:200px; width:200px" /></td> <td><img alt="Jeff Ericson photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160428023801.jpg " style="height:200px; width:200px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Matt Cail</em></td> <td><em>Jeff Ericson </em></td> </tr> <tr> <td><img alt="Sarri Gilman photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160428023845.jpg " style="height:200px; width:200px" /></td> <td><img alt="Shaela Niles photo" src="http://www.sno-isle.org/assets/5039/5039_20160428023920.jpg " style="height:200px; width:200px" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td><em>Sarri Gilman</em></td> <td><em>Shaela Niles</em></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Think of it as a taste of TEDx.</p> <p>On Tuesday, May 10, Edmonds Community College, Sno-Isle Libraries, Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation and The Daily Herald will serve up &ldquo;Shift Happens: Creating New Futures.&rdquo; The 7 p.m. event will be at Black Box Theatre in Mukilteo Hall at Edmonds CC, 20000 68th Ave. W, Lynnwood. It is free and open to the public.</p> <p>The program is a TEDx Salon event, an extension of<a href="http://www.sno-isle.org/tedx/"> TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2016</a>, scheduled for Nov. 18 at Edmonds Center for the Arts.</p> <p>&ldquo;TEDx Salons are bite-sized TEDx events&rdquo; said Ken Harvey, TEDxSnoIsleLibraries organizer and communications director for the library district. &ldquo;The audience and speakers can have a closer interaction. Attendees are invited to discuss speakers&rsquo; ideas and experience a cohesive community of thinkers.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;We&rsquo;re excited for this opportunity to partner with the Sno-Isle Libraries and The Daily Herald to bring rich dialogue to our campus and community,&rdquo; said Dr. Jean Hernandez, Edmonds CC President. &ldquo;The TEDx conversations are invaluable to our community.&rdquo;</p> <p>Host and moderator for the evening will be publisher of The Daily Herald, Josh O&rsquo;Connor. The event will include three speakers and one video, including:</p> <p>Matt Cail &ndash; An online marketer and consultant, Cail started out with message boards and expanded into social media, search engine marketing, web design and online advertising. His company, Super Charge Marketing, provides digital marketing support and services.</p> <p>Jeff Ericson - Now in his second successful career, Ericson owns Camano Island Coffee Roasters, known for its zeal in making the world a better place. In addition to running the company, Ericson lectures around the world on business, sustainability and the future of social enterprise.</p> <p>Sarri Gilman &ndash; Gilman&rsquo;s book, &ldquo;Transform Your Boundaries,&rdquo; is based on insights gleaned from decades of experience as a marriage and family therapist. The founder of two organizations focused on youth homelessness, she created partnerships and programs to increase the chances of success for youth in overwhelming circumstances.</p> <p>In addition, a video will show Shaela Niles&rsquo; inspirational battle to overcome mutism and unlock her life and future.</p> <p>&ldquo;Shift Happens&rdquo; is a year-long theme for Edmonds CC providing the framework for a variety of campus and community events. &nbsp;&ldquo;Shift Happens: Creating New Futures&rdquo; is part of a lecture series sponsored by the Center for Student Engagement and Leadership to bring thought-provoking and inspirational speakers to campus.</p> <p>&ldquo;We appreciate the opportunity to host this event with Edmonds Community College and The Herald,&rdquo; Harvey said.</p> <p><strong>For more information, contact:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </strong></p> <p>Jim Hills, Public Sno-Isle Libraries Communications Manager, <a href="mailto:jhills@sno-isle.org, 360-651-7050">jhills@sno-isle.org, 360-651-7050</a></p> <p>Marisa Pierce, Edmonds CC Director of Marketing and Public Information, <a href="mailto:marisa.pierce@edcc.edu">marisa.pierce@edcc.edu</a>, <a href="tel:425.640.1697">425.640.1697</a></p> Thu, 28 Apr 2016 07:00:00 GMT http://www.sno-isle.org/news-releases/?nid=243