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News Releases

02/14/2018
Lake Stevens Library bond misses 60-percent mark
The current Lake Stevens Library on Main Street.

It looks like the Lake Stevens community won’t be getting a new library.

“In 2017 and again this year, most voters said the community needs a new library, but the library bond measure didn’t meet the required threshold for passing,” said Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director.

Election results show 50.81 percent of voters approving a bond measure to build a new library. The measure needs at least 60 percent approval and a minimum voter turnout of 2,792 ballots cast. As of Feb. 14, 7,013 ballots had been counted. Election results are scheduled to be certified Feb. 23.

“Although disappointed with the results of this election, we want to thank the community for its continued use of their library,” Woolf-Ivory said. “We are committed to continue providing library services to the Lake Stevens community.”

Assuming the ballot-count trend continues, the bond measure would fail and the Lake Stevens Library Capital Facility Area (LCFA) taxing district approved by voters in 2017 would be dissolved. State law allows only two tries at a bond measure once an LCFA is approved. A similar bond measure was on the 2017 ballot. That measure also received a majority of support from voters at 66 percent approval, but not enough ballots were returned to validate the election.

“We want to thank all who have been so committed to the community’s vision for a new library,” Woolf-Ivory said. “We will closely review the results of this election before deciding on next steps.”

The ballot measure called for up to $17 million in bond sales to finance a new 20,000 square foot library. The new facility would have been on property previously purchased by the library district near 99th Avenue NE and Market Place in the Chapel Hill area.   

The current Lake Stevens Library building on Main Street is owned by the City of Lake Stevens. It is on property the city envisions for redevelopment as part of the Downtown Subarea Plan.  The Chapel Hill property purchased by the library district for the new library is adjacent to property owned by the city. City and library officials are collaborating on a joint-use plan. The properties are part of the city’s Lake Stevens Center Subarea Plan.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 23 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries public information manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

02/13/2018
Early returns show Lake Stevens levy behind

The Lake Stevens community may not be getting a new library.

“The current ballot count does not look promising, however, we are going to await the final count before commenting further,” said Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory, Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director.

Early results show 50.87 percent of voters approving a bond measure to build a new library. The measure needs at least 60 percent approval and a minimum voter turnout of 2,792 ballots cast. As of Feb. 12, 5,904 ballots had been returned. Election results are scheduled to be certified Feb. 23.

“We want to thank all who have been so committed to the community’s vision for a new library,” Woolf-Ivory said. “Regardless of the outcome of the election, we are committed to continue providing library services to the Lake Stevens community.”

If bond measure fails, the Lake Stevens Library Capital Facility Area (LCFA) taxing district approved by voters in 2017 would be dissolved. State law allows only two tries at a bond measure once an LCFA is approved. A similar bond measure was on the 2017 ballot. That measure received 66 percent approval, but not enough ballots were returned to validate the election.

If the measure does fail, Woolf-Ivory said, “We will closely review the results of this election before deciding on next steps.”

If the bond measure passes, the next steps would include hiring an architect, forming a building committee and starting the design and pre-construction phases. There will be multiple opportunities for the public to provide input during the process.

“Construction should begin by mid-2019 and we’d hope to open the doors of the new library by fall 2020,” Woolf-Ivory said. “In the meantime, we would continue providing library services to the Lake Stevens community.”

The ballot measure calls for up to $17 million in bond sales to finance a new 20,000 square foot library. The new facility would on property previously purchased by the library district near 99th Avenue NE and Market Place. Project costs include the property, engineering, construction, furnishings, equipment and materials (books, DVDs, etc.).

Passage of the bond measure would enable a property-tax levy of 21.1 cents for each $1,000 of assessed value. Once the bonds are paid off over 20 years, the bond levy would no longer be assessed.

The current Lake Stevens Library building is owned by the City of Lake Stevens. It is on property the city envisions for redevelopment as part of the Downtown Subarea Plan.  The new library would be owned by the library district and is adjacent to property owned by the city. City and library officials are collaborating on a joint-use plan for the properties. The properties are part of the city’s Lake Stevens Center Subarea Plan.

Information about the new Lake Stevens Library project is at sno-isle.org/lake-stevens.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 23 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries public information manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

02/12/2018
Orientation set for potential contractors to Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries is hosting an orientation for companies that may want to provide facilities-related services to the library district.

The event is scheduled for 9-11 a.m., Friday, Feb. 23 at the Sno-Isle Libraries Administrative Service Center, 7312 35th Ave. NE, Marysville, WA, 98271.

Sno-Isle Libraries logoSno-Isle Libraries provides library services to more than 740,000 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 23 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.  

“We want to help prospective bidders in our communities understand how to do business with Sno-Isle Libraries,” said Brian Rush, facilities manager. “We value our relationship with vendors and strive to be excellent stewards of the public funds entrusted to us.”

Sno-Isle Libraries follows Washington State Bid Law and Prevailing Wage Guidelines. Information about becoming a state-approved vendor or contractor will be available and library-district staff members will offer assistance that day to help attendees start the process. 

Topics to be discussed include: 

  • General overview of facilities
  • MRSC approved contractor list
  • Prevailing wage requirements
  • Intents and affidavits
  • Work rules and safety 
  • Procurement and invoicing 
  • State bid law and requirements
  • Library district 10 year facilities plan
  • Projects – expense and capital
  • Sno-Isle Libraries website
  • Q&A session

Advance notification of attendance is requested at brush@sno-isle.org, but not required.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 23 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Brian Rush, Sno-Isle Libraries facilities manager, 360-651-7093, brush@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries public information manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

 

01/30/2018
BookFlix puts stars in the ears of young readers

When Meryl Streep speaks, people listen, and she has the Academy Awards to prove it.

Now, Sno-Isle Libraries is bringing Streep’s voice and those of other well-known actors and singers to a new audience: preschoolers and beginning readers.

BookFlix logoBookFlix is an online storytelling service available to the nearly half-million Sno-Isle Libraries cardholders. The service is part of the library district’s strategic priority to increase kindergarten readiness in language and literacy.

“Sno-Isle Libraries is committed to getting children ready to read and ready for kindergarten,” said Joy Feldman, early learning coordinator for the library district.  “We look for literacy programs that support the five research-verified best-practices of talking, singing, reading, writing and playing.”

BookFlix, from Scholastic Digital, pairs visual presentations of classic children’s tales with factual, non-fiction ebooks about the same subject. The goal is to build a love of reading and learning.

“The data show that 87 percent of BookFLIX readers report an increase in reading motivation,” Feldman said. “We know that creating a genuine interest in books lays the groundwork for later reading success.”

BookFLIX combines great stories with great storytellers.

“Have you ever wondered what makes a successful read-aloud?” Feldman said. “Research shows that the most important quality is the storyteller.” While a parent’s voice is the gold standard, BookFlix narrators include actors such as Streep, Morgan Freeman, John Lithgow and singers including Randy Travis and Cyndi Lauper.

“The University of Washington i-Labs tells us that for young children to learn, the content needs to be meaningful to them,” Feldman said. “Bringing high-quality nonfiction and fiction together creates stronger and more successful learning opportunities for young readers as they prepare for kindergarten and beyond.”

In addition to BookFlix, Sno-Isle Libraries offers other online resources for young readers, including:

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 23 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

01/30/2018
Issues That Matter mental health forums continue in February

 

It’s clear that the Sno-Isle Libraries’ Issues That Matter events for 2017-18 are striking chords.

The theme, “Mental Health: Let’s Talk,” encompasses a breadth of subjects, from dealing with dementia to addiction to traumatic brain injury and more. Since this past November, the community events are drawing large and engaged audiences. The recent “Care for Alzheimer's Caregivers” program brought an overflow crowd to the Lynnwood Library.

The series continues in February with these five forums:

Mental Health Resources in Island County
1:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 5, at the Coupeville Library. Panelists: Charlene Ray, Island County Mental Health; Chris Garden, Coupeville Marshal & North Sound Behavioral Health advisory board member; Rob May, EMS, Whidbey Health;  Judy Heinemann, Compass Health. Host: Jackie Henderson, Director of Island County Human Services

Addiction/Substance Abuse
6:30 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 7, at the Mariner High School Little Theater, hosted by the Mariner Library.
Panelists: Natalie Fryar, Director of Clinical Operations, Evergreen Recovery Centers; Sgt. Ian Huri, Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office, Office of Neighborhoods; Robert Smiley, The Hand Up Project, Founder. Moderator: Judy Hoff from The Hoff Foundation

Caring for Someone During a Mental Health Emergency
6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 13, at the Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley, hosted by ClintonFreeland and Langley libraries. Sarri Gilman, author of "Transform Your Boundaries," 25 Mental Health Tips to Support Your Wellbeing and a TEDxSnoIsleLibraries speaker will be joined by Dr. Howard Aposhyan, Charlene Ray, LICSW, and others who will share ways to understand mental health challenges and how to find help and support. 

Veterans and Mental Health
6:30 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 22, at Mill Creek City Council Chambers, hosted by the Mill Creek Library. Panelists: Chuck Wright, veteran and traumatic stress specialist; Laurie Akers, a therapist specializing in helping transitioning veterans; Sam Powers, veteran and director of Student Veteran life at the University of Washington. Moderator: Andrew Ballard, educator and marketing executive.

Helping Friends or Family with Mental Health Issues
6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 27 at the Granite Falls Library.  Panelists: Stacey Alles, Chief Operating Officer, Compass Health; Susan Gregory, Crisis Services Assistant Program Manager, Volunteers of America Western Washington; Shira Hasson-Schiff, Director of Prevention services, Cocoon House; Peggy Ray, Program Manager, Arlington/Granite Falls/Lake Stevens Community Resource Centers – Lutheran Community Services Northwest. Moderator: Dennis Smith, retired school psychologist and counselor, Granite Falls Community Coalition board member

All five events will be live-streamed to the Sno-Isle Libraries Facebook page where videos from previous events in the series are also available. More information about the series along with resource lists are on the Sno-Isle Libraries website.

Issues That Matter programs are intended to encourage community conversations on high-profile topics. These events are free and open to the public. Funding is provided by the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. 

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 23 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

01/23/2018
Naol Debele joins Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees

 

Naol Debele

Naol Debele is the newest member of the Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees.

Debele is a student at Edmonds Community College (EdCC) where he serves as a student trustee on the college Board of Trustees. He works as a teacher’s assistant for mathematics in the college’s Learning Support Center, is a member of the college Strategic Council committee, volunteers with the college foundation and participated on the winning team in the college Ethics Challenge.

Debele expects to graduate from EdCC in 2018 with an Associate in Arts transfer degree. He has participated in several physics-related projects at the University of Washington and intends to transfer to a university and study physics.

“We’re very pleased to have Naol join the library district’s Board of Trustees,” Board Vice President Martin Munguia said at the board’s Jan. 22, 2018 regular meeting. “His life experience and perspective will be valuable additions to board discussions and decision making.”

Prior to attending EdCC, Debele attended the Piney Woods School in Piney Woods, Miss. Before that, he attended the Andinet International School in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

“I believe I will bring a different perspective to the board,” Debele said in his application. “I have been using Sno-Isle Libraries for the past two years and understand what great impact it has had on me and my education.”

Debele said that his parents were both national politicians in Ethiopia.

“Sno-Isle Libraries’ mission aligns with my beliefs and values in which I was raised and advocate for; to ensure equality, equity and affordable education in our community,” Debele said. “I am dedicated and passionate to be on the board that oversees the organization.”

Debele was appointed by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners to finish the term of Sue Cohn, who resigned in 2017. The term ends on Dec. 31, 2019, and Debele would then be eligible for reappointment to a full seven-year term.

Sno-Isle Libraries is directed by a seven-member Board of Trustees. Trustees are volunteers who may submit applications and are then appointed when positions are available by the Snohomish County Council and Island County Board of Commissioners to represent residents throughout the library district.

Debele joins board members Marti Anamosa, President; Martin Munguia, Vice President; Susan Kostick, Secretary; and members Kelli Smith, Rico Tessandore and Rose Olson. The executive director is Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

 

01/12/2018
Lake Steven Rotarians hear about library bond measure
Sonia Gustafson, managing librarian at the Lake Stevens Library, speaks to the Lake Stevens Rotary on Friday, Jan. 12.

Whether it is a water project in Africa or funding scholarships for high-schoolers, Lake Stevens Rotarians are all about service to others.

At their Jan. 12 breakfast meeting, members heard about another effort that, if approved by voters, is intended serve the community. Lake Stevens Library managing librarian Sonia Gustafson presented information about a bond measure on the upcoming Feb. 13 ballot that would build a new, larger library to serve the growing Lake Stevens area.

“Since I’ve been at the library, customers regularly ask, ‘Why isn’t it bigger,’” Gustafson told the group gathered at the Lake Stevens School District Educational Service Center. The current library is about 2,500 square feet, she said. A new library would be eight times larger, about 20,000 square feet, if the bond measure is approved.

Along with more space, a new library would include more books and other materials, more computers … “Really, more of everything,” Gustafson said.  And, the proposed library would have one thing the current library doesn’t have, she said, “If the ballot measure is approved, the new library would have a meeting room available to the community.”

The proposed library would be built on the corner of 99th Avenue NE and Market Place. Sno-Isle Libraries purchased land in 2016, next to property already owned by the City of Lake Stevens. Gustafson said the location prompts another common question: “Why not stay at the current spot?”

“The existing building is owned by the city and they have other plans for that area,” she said. The city’s downtown subarea plan calls for an expanded North Cove Park, including the area where the current library sits. Some other city-owned buildings at the location have already been removed.

Another question that comes up, Gustafson told the Rotarians, is, “Didn’t we already vote on this?”

A year ago, there were two items on the ballot. The first measure established the Lake Stevens Library Capital Facility Area, passing with 69 percent approval. The second measure was a bond to build the new library. While it received a 66 percent approval, the required turnout fell short by 749 voters and didn’t pass.

The Feb. 13 ballot includes only one measure, the bond that would build a new library if approved, she said. For more information, two in-person open-house events are scheduled and there is an online version. The open-house events are:

Saturday, Jan. 20
10-11:30 a.m.
Community Center
1808 Main St.

Wednesday, Jan. 24
6-7:30 p.m.
Fire District Station 82
9811 Chapel Hill Road

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
  • Sonia Gustafson, Lake Stevens Library Managing Librarian, 425-334-1900, sgustafson@sno-isle.org
01/09/2018
Sno-Isle Libraries opens Lakewood/Smokey Point Library
Cutting the ribbon was a community effort at the Jan. 6 grand opening for the Lakewood/Smokey Point Library.  Photo gallery

According to the plan, residents in the growing Lakewood-Smokey Point area have been underserved when comes to library services.

According to the residents turning out for the Jan. 6 grand opening of the Lakewood/Smokey Point Library, the plan was right.

But, no longer.

“Your day is here, and your library is open,” Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said in her remarks to the crowd. 

The library district’s 2016-25 Capital Facilities Plan calls for establishing a demonstration library to serve the area. This is the third time Sno-Isle Libraries has used the demonstration library idea. The approach includes leasing space, allowing both area residents and library officials to better understand community needs before considering a more permanent location. The Camano Library started as a demonstration library and the Mariner Library opened in 2017 as a demonstration project.

Woolf-Ivory said the new library is an acknowledgment of community and economic development occurring in Lakewood-Smokey Point. “This new library is an example of the excitement and growth sweeping through this area,” she said.

Arlington Mayor Barb Tolbert echoed those sentiments.

“We have always believed the Stillaguamish Valley was the best place in the world to live. It is rapidly becoming one of the best places to visit, to shop, to eat, to receive medical attention, and to learn,” Tolbert said. “This new library is another vital element in our area’s success.

“I think, judging by the size of the crowd, that it really validates the need we knew was here.”

Lakewood School Superintendent Michael Mack said he is excited that students will now have a community library. “We have so desperately wanted and needed one of these,” he said.

Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees Chair Marti Anamosa said the new Lakewood/Smokey Point Library was a top priority in the capital facilities plan.

“Several years ago we started looking at population growth to look at where we might need to build new libraries and the Smokey Point and Lakewood area jumped out at us," Anamosa said.

“We realized a critical mass was forming here and there were a lot of people who needed better access to a library.”

Significant financial support for the library came from the community through the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation.

Foundation Executive Director Paul Pitkin said the Stillaguamish Tribe and The Mark and Vickie Fund at the Nysether Family Foundation each contributed  $25,000 to help with library expenses. The donations went to the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation, which then directed the funds to needs at the Lakewood/Smokey Point Library.

“We’re so grateful for this support,” Pitkin said. “The tribe and Mark and Vickie were very generous.”

The Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation funds programs at libraries across Snohomish and Island counties. “The foundation provides a way for people to help their community libraries through private donations and enable excellence beyond what is possible through public funds alone,” Pitkin said. 

Other agencies joining the grand opening event with information for attendees included:

  • Lakewood School District
  • City of Arlington
  • Community Transit
  • Snohomish Health District
  • Snohomish County Auditor voter registration
  • Providence Institute for a Healthier Community 

The new library is the 23rd in the library district. It includes free wi-fi, laptops for checkout and coffee-shop-like laptop bar, a children’s’ area, a teen area with study carrels, other desks, a variety of upholstered seating and a community meeting room. Customers will have the same access to the entire 1.2 million-item collection and services that are available at any of the community libraries. The address 3411 169th Place NE, Suites ABC, Arlington, near Tractor Supply Co. and Lowe's.

Branch manager Jocelyn Redel said storytimes and other programming will start soon start. The library’s hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. More information is available at sno-isle.org/lakewood-smokeypoint.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 23 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

12/26/2017

Updated:
12/27/2017
New Lakewood/Smokey Point Library to open Jan. 6
Lakewood/Smokey Point Library Manager Jocelyn Redel takes a moment before the shelves were filled. Photo gallery

The new year will see a new library serving the Lakewood-Smokey point area.

The grand opening of the new facility named the Lakewood/Smokey Point Library is scheduled for 9:30 a.m., Jan. 6.

 “Opening a new library is a big project and staff members across Sno-Isle Libraries have been working hard to get the library ready,” said Jocelyn Redel, recently named as library manager.

The library district leased space at 3411 169th Place NE, just off Smokey Point Boulevard, close to the Lowe’s and Tractor Supply stores and near I-5 and Highway 531. Following Saturday’s opening ceremony, the library will be open from 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. There also will be special grand-opening hours on Sunday and Monday, Jan. 7-8, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The library’s normal schedule will be:

  • Tuesday: 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
  • Wednesday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
  • Thursday: 11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
  • Friday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
  • Saturday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

As the 23rd and newest in the Sno-Isle Libraries system, library customers will be able to access all the same materials and services that are available in the district collection of more than 1.2 million items. As with all Sno-Isle Libraries facilities, the library will offer free wi-fi.

Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said the new library has been in the planning stages for a number of years. “We said in the 2016-2025 Capital Facilities Plan that the growing Lakewood-Smokey Point community deserves better library services,” Woolf-Ivory said. “Now, we’re following through on that recommendation.”

The grand opening ceremonies are scheduled to start at 9:30 a.m. Among those scheduled to offer welcome comments at the event are Woolf-Ivory, Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees Chair Marti Anamosa, Arlington Mayor Barb Tolbert, Lakewood School District Superintendent Michael Mack and Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation Director Paul Pitkin. Along with a ribbon-cutting ceremony, there will be live music by an ensemble from Lakewood High School.

Other agencies joining the event with information for attendees include:

  • Lakewood School District
  • City of Arlington
  • Community Transit
  • Snohomish Health District
  • Snohomish County Auditor voter registration
  • LiveHealthy 2020

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

12/12/2017
Trustees vote to put levy on April 24 ballot

Sno-Isle Libraries will ask voters to maintain funding with a ballot measure in April, 2018.

“Going to the voters is not a decision we take lightly,” Board of Trustees President Marti Anamosa said before a unanimous vote at the Dec. 11 regular meeting. “Libraries are vital to our communities. Addressing the levy rate now enables the library to continue providing the resources that are so important to our communities and customers.”

The resolution passed by the trustees calls for asking the voters to consider restoring 9 cents to the library district's regular operating levy. The 2018 levy rate is expected to be 38 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. If voters approve the ballot measure scheduled for April 24, 2018, the levy rate would go to 47 cents in 2019.

Sno-Isle Libraries receives 98 percent of its funding from a property-tax levy across most of Snohomish and all of Island counties.

“The predictability of property-tax revenue helps in budgeting, but unfortunately costs often rise more rapidly than revenue,” Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. The library district’s strategy, she said, is to do what most people do; budget carefully and put some away in savings.

“We last went to the voters in 2009,” Woolf-Ivory said. “Those were tough times and we promised that if our communities said ‘yes,’ we wouldn’t come back for at least five years and we’ve stretched that five years to nine. We made good on our promise by using what was necessary to maintain services and reserved the rest until needed.”

Woolf-Ivory said the need to draw from reserves began three years ago and was used again to balance the 2018 budget. “By the 2019 budget, there won’t be enough in regular funding and the levy stabilization reserve to maintain current services.”

Board President Anamosa said the combination of the library district’s history of “careful, thoughtful and practical” budgeting with recent community survey results made the decision to go to voters a reasonable choice.

“The results from phone, email and online surveys, as well as three open-house events, indicate to me that the community wants an opportunity to vote,” Anamosa said.

Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation President Terry Lippincott thanked the trustees for bringing the levy question to the voters.

"The Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation partners with Sno-Isle Libraries to bring strong programming to community libraries," Lippincott said. "We're excited to be part of the community support that includes corporate partners, friends-of-the-library organizations and a huge group of dedicated library volunteers."

Voter approval of a library operations levy means library services would continue at current levels. If voters do not approve the ballot measure in April, the next step would be budget cuts for 2019 and service reductions.

“We project that the 2019 budget would need to be cut by $2 million,” said Woolf-Ivory, adding that additional reductions would be needed in 2020 and subsequent years.

“If cuts are necessary, the only way you get to $2 million is examining reductions in personnel and materials costs,” Woolf-Ivory said. Such budget reductions would mean:

  • Fewer open hours, fewer library services and fewer librarians would be hired as current staff members depart.
  • Fewer new titles, a smaller collection and longer customer wait times for print and digital books, movies and music.

Without additional revenue, budget reductions in 2019 would be followed by additional cuts in 2020 and beyond, reducing the library district's ability to meet requests and expectations of communities and customers each year.

Sno-Isle Libraries operates 22 community libraries, bookmobile, outreach and online services available to more than 743,000 people across Snohomish and Island counties. More than 476,000 library cardholders use a variety of services annually. Children and families attended 7,280 library programs, drawing 221,000 attendees in 2016.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

12/04/2017
County Council puts new Lake Stevens Library on ballot
If voters approve a Feb. 13, 2018, bond measure, the current Lake Stevens Library (top) would be replaced with a new, larger building on property near the corner of  99th Avenue NE and Market Place (below).

Voters will get a chance to decide on a new library for the Lake Stevens area.

The final step to putting a library bond measure on the Feb. 13, 2018, ballot was passed unanimously Dec. 4 by the Snohomish County Council.

“The Lake Stevens community has told us for years that a new, larger library is needed,” Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. “The actions and support of the Friends of the Lake Stevens Library, the Lake Stevens Library Board, the City of Lake Stevens, the Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees and now the county council bring that opportunity to the community.”

County Council member Sam Low, previously a member of the Lake Stevens City Council, said he supports going to the voters. “The citizens of Lake Stevens have told me they want to have a voice with regard to a library in our city,” Low said.  “This vote will allow that voice.”

The Lake Stevens City Council on Oct. 24 unanimously passed a resolution supporting putting the bond measure on the Feb. 13 ballot. This past summer, both the Lake Stevens Library Board and the Friends of the Lake Stevens Library sent letters to the city council calling for a larger library for the community.

The bond measure on the ballot will be for up to $17 million to build and furnish a new 20,000 square foot library. The location of the new building would be near 99th Avenue NE and Market Place in an area known as Chapel Hill.

“Our 2016-25 Capital Facilities Plan identified the need in the Lake Stevens community as a priority,” Woolf-Ivory said. “Community members were clear that they felt the current library is too small for this rapidly growing area.”

The current library is about 2,500 square feet. It is in a city-owned building in an area identified by the city for redevelopment. The location of the proposed new library is included in a subarea plan by the City of Lake Stevens. The new building would be owned and maintained by Sno-Isle Libraries.

The proposed site was purchased by the library district in 2016 and is adjacent to property owned by the City of Lake Stevens. Woolf-Ivory, Lake Stevens Mayor John Spencer and others from the city and library district have been in discussions on how to collaboratively best use the parcels.

This is the second time the library bond measure will go to voters. On the Feb. 14, 2017 ballot, the bond measure received a 66-percent “Yes” vote. While the approval rate was above the required 60 percent, voter turnout missed the needed threshold.

Also on the 2017 ballot was a measure establishing the Lake Steven Library Capital Facility Area (LCFA). That measure passed with a 69 percent “Yes” vote and didn’t have a voter-turnout requirement.

The proposed bond would be for 20-years and repaid by a property-tax levy assessed within the LCFA boundaries, which mirror those of the Lake Stevens School District. The projected levy rate would be 21.1 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value. The owner of a $350,000 home would pay $73.85. When the bonds are paid off in 20 years, the levy would go away.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

11/28/2017
Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees adopts budget for 2018

The 2018 budget for Sno-Isle Libraries is in place following unanimous action by the Board of Trustees at the Nov. 27 regular meeting.

“This budget focuses on the 2017-19 strategic priorities for the library district,” Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said in presenting the budget during the meeting at the district’s Service Center in Marysville. “The budget also continues to integrate elements of our 10-year capital facilities plan.”

On the revenue side, the budget is based on just more than $57 million in total revenue. Property-tax revenue accounts for 96.7 percent of the revenue. Property-tax revenue comes from a levy on properties in unincorporated Snohomish and Island counties as well as cities that have annexed to the library district.

The estimated levy rate for 2018 will decrease to 38 cents for each $1,000 of assessed property value, well under the 50-cent cap allowed by law. The decline is due to a combination of the law limiting levy increases to not more than 1 percent a year and rising property values.

To maintain current levels of service, the 2018 budget includes a transfer from reserves totaling $4.8 million.

“Using reserves in this manner was always part of the library district’s long-term budget planning,” Woolf-Ivory said. “Voters approved a levy-rate increase in 2009. For the six years starting in 2010, funds were placed into the levy rate stabilization reserve account. Starting in 2016, we began using those savings to maintain service levels.”

On the expense side of the budget, the two biggest items are related to people and materials. Salaries and benefits account for 68 percent of the expenditures for 2018. New materials for the library district collection – books, music, movies, digital resources and more – add up to 13.4 percent of the operating budget.

Among the other expenditures include professional and contract services at 4 percent of the budget and software and licensing fees at 2 percent.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

11/06/2017
Books are this Pearl's oyster
Nancy Pearl

Nancy Pearl is a librarian, book reviewer, teacher and author.

This Wednesday, Nov. 8, Pearl will wear two of those hats when she takes the stage at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts (WICA) not once, but twice in events hosted by the Friends of the Langley Library.

At 11 a.m., Pearl the reviewer will share her list of favorite books of the year. Pearl and her reviews and lists are well-known from appearances on public radio and her books “Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment and Reason,” “More Book Lust,” “Book Lust to Go” and “Book Crush,” which included recommendations for children and teens.

This is Pearl’s 20th anniversary of her first book talks at WICA. In honor of the occasion, Pearl will include favorite lists and recommendations from years past.

At 7:30 p.m., Pearl will be back on the WICA stage to talk about her own and very first novel, “George & Lizzie.” This benefit book reading and signing will include anecdotes about her own journey into fiction. Now on the receiving end of reviews, Sno-Isle Libraries’ reaction by KatC includes, “This book surprised me and will stick with me. This story will appeal to anyone who is interested in human behavior, …. George & Lizzie ticked off all the boxes for me.”

Tickets are required with proceeds to benefit the Friends of Langley Library and WICA.

The Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, is at 565 Camano Ave, Langley. 

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

 

10/30/2017
Community conversation in Arlington focuses on dementia

The Sno-Isle Libraries librarians have created resource lists related to various aspects of mental health that will be the focus of Issues That Matter events:

Whether it is a mental illness or another health risk of aging, dementia can have devastating effects on those who have it and their families.

As part of Sno-Isle Libraries’ ongoing Issues That Matter series, the Arlington Library is hosting “Families and Dementia,” 6:30 p.m., Nov. 9, at the Stillaguamish Senior Center, 18218 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington.

This community conversation will include a panel discussion with Arlington Mayor Barb Tolbert as moderator.

“More families are trying to cope with the issues that arise when a loved one has dementia,” Tolbert said. “The library’s Issues That Matter series is a good way for the community to talk, listen and learn more.”

Panelists will include Marilyn Enright, outreach social worker with the Stillaguamish Senior Center; Ruth Egger, of Homage Senior Services; Aime Fink, supervisor for the Long Term Care and Aging Administration for Snohomish County; and Hazel Borden, Snohomish outreach coordinator for the Washington chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association.

“This information is of interest to a broad spectrum of people,” Borden said. “When I give a presentation, whether it is ‘Healthy Living for the Brain’ or the 10 warning signs of dementia, people are interested in learning more.”

Borden said the Alzheimer’s Association’s helpline at 1-800-272-3900 is a good place to start. “We also offer in-home care consultations at no-charge,” Borden said.

The Arlington event is the first in the 2017-18 Issues That Matter series focusing on aspects of mental health. Issues That Matter programs are intended to encourage conversations on topics of community interest. Building civic engagement to address community issues is a priority for Sno-Isle Libraries. Issues Tha Matter events are free and open to the public. Funding is provided by the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation.

The current schedule of Issues That Matter events includes:

Families and Dementia
Arlington Library, 6:30 p.m. Nov. 9, at Stillaguamish Senior Center, Arlington
Panelists: Marilyn Enright, Stillaguamish Senior Center; Ruth Egger, Homage, Hazel Borden, Alzheimers Associaton; Aime Fink, Snohomish County. Moderator: Mayor Barbara Tolbert.

Aging and Mental Health
Sultan Library, 10 a.m. Nov. 20, at Sky Valley Senior Center
Confirmed panelist: Carol Teichgrab, Mental Health Outreach Specialist, Homage Senior Services

Living with Traumatic Brain Injuries
Snohomish Library, 2 p.m. Dec. 3
Featuring representatives of the Brain Injury Alliance of Washington and Delta Rehabilitation Center

Self-care as an Accepted Practice
Mountlake Terrace Library, 6:30 p.m. Dec. 6
Experts and audience members will explore self-care for optimal health and its role in the ability to support others. Panelists: Sarri Gilman, family therapist and author of Transform Your Boundaries; Amber Saldivar, mental health counselor, and Saranne Moreschi, Family-to-Family instructor with National Alliance on Mental Illness.

Trauma Timeline: Breaking down barriers for community healing
Darrington Library, 2 p.m. Jan. 20, 2018

Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment options, mental health of caregivers
Lynnwood Library 7 p.m. Jan. 25, 2018
Participating organizations: Northshore Senior Center, Homage Senior Services, Alzheimer's Association of Washington State

Youth and Mental Health
Lake Stevens Library, 6:30 p.m. Jan. 25, 2018

Veterans and Mental Health
Monroe Library, 2 p.m. Jan. 27, 2018

Youth Mental Health
Oak Harbor Library, January 2018

Addiction/Substance Abuse
Mariner Library, 6:30 p.m. Feb. 7, 2018, at Mariner High School Little Theater

Self-care for Caregivers and Supportive Friends and Family
Brier Library, 6 p.m. Feb. 8, 2018

Mental Health Resources in Island County
Coupeville Library, February, 2018
Panelists: Charlene Ray, Island County Mental Health; Larry Cox, Compass Health

Caring for Someone During a Mental Health Emergency
ClintonFreeland and Langley libraries. 6:30 p.m. Feb. 13, 2018, at Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley.
An evening with Sarri Gilman, author of Transform Your Boundaries and "Naming and Taming Overwhelm" and a TEDxSnoIsleLibraries speaker.

Veterans and Mental Health
Mill Creek Library, 6:30 p.m. Feb. 22, 2018, at  Mill Creek City Council Chambers

Helping Friends or Family with Mental Health Issues
Granite Falls Library, 6:30 p.m., Feb. 27, 2018

Teen Depression and Suicide
Edmonds Library, time and date TBA

Parenting a Troubled Teen
Camano Island Library, time and date TBA

Self-Care for Friends, Family and Caregivers
Stanwood Library, time and date TBA

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
  • Kathy Bullene, Arlington Library Managing Librarian, 360-435-3033, kbullene@sno-isle.org
10/25/2017
New Lake Stevens Library moves closer to ballot
Lake Stevens Library Managing Librarian Sonia Gustafson and members of the Lake Stevens Library Board, Kevin Stone, Abe Martinez, Debbie Ames, Janice Stepp, Board Chair Shaelynn Charvet Bates and Andy Powers (from left) gathered Aug. 23 at the Chapel Hill-area property proposed for a new Lake Stevens Library. The get-together was the day after Charvet Bates presented a unanimous letter of support for the proposed project from the library board to the Lake Stevens City Council. The Friends of the Lake Stevens Library group has also presented a similar letter of support to the city council.    

A bond measure for a new, larger Lake Stevens Library is one step away from being on the ballot in February.

Three related actions this week by the Sno-Isle Libraries Board of Trustees, the Lake Stevens City Council and members of the Lake Stevens Library Capital Facility Area (LCFA) governing body are paving the way for voters to weigh in on a new library.

“The Lake Stevens community is growing and deserves a library that can deliver the services that community members want and need,” Sno-Isle Libraries Executive Director Jonalyn Woolf-Ivory said. “The support of the community, the city council and Mayor John Spencer along with the LCFA is gratifying.”

On Monday, Oct. 23, the library-district trustees voted unanimously to request putting a bond measure on the Feb. 13, 2018, ballot. The proposed bond of not more than $17 million would pay for building, furnishing and equipping a new 20,000-square-foot library on property at 99th Avenue NE and Market Place in Lake Stevens.

On Tuesday, Oct. 24, the city council members voted unanimously to approve a companion resolution to the one passed the library-district trustees.

“I’m very pleased with our council’s support for a new library,” Lake Stevens Mayor John Spencer said. “Our city and the surrounding community is one of the fastest growing in the region. We’ve been working with the library district to bring a facility that meets our needs and I look forward to continuing that collaboration.”

Today, Oct. 25, both the library district’s and city’s resolutions went to three-member LCFA governing body and again was unanimously approved. The LCFA members are Snohomish County Council members Sam Low, Nate Nehring and Brian Sullivan. The next and final step before appearing on the Feb. 13 ballot is consideration by the full county council, expected in early December.

If voters approve a bond measure in February, it would be the second half of a process that started earlier this year.

On Valentine’s Day 2017, voters passed a measure that created the LCFA with 69 percent “yes” vote. On that same ballot, a bond proposal received 66 percent approval, but fell short of the required voter turnout.

The Lake Stevens Library has long been recognized as too small to serve the existing community as well as the projected growth for the area. The Sno-Isle Libraries 10-year capital facilities plan published in 2016 recommends replacing the current library with a new, larger facility.

The current library building is owned by the City of Lake Stevens on property identified for redevelopment in the Lake Stevens Downtown Subarea Plan. Library services are provided by Sno-Isle Libraries. In 2008, city residents approved joining the library district. Funding from the 2008 vote helps cover Lake Stevens Library operating costs, but not a new facility.

If the bond measure is approved in February, a new Lake Stevens Library would be owned by Sno-Isle Libraries. What a new library would look like would be determined later with opportunities for public input if funding is approved by voters.

The property purchased in 2016 by the library district is adjacent to land that was already owned by the City of Lake Stevens. The city is considering moving some services from downtown to the new location. City and library officials have been in discussions on how to utilize both properties to achieve library and city goals. 

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

 

10/13/2017

Updated:
10/18/2017
TEDxSnoIsleLibraries reservations open Sunday, Oct. 15

Reservations for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2017 open at 7 a.m., Sunday, Oct. 15.

The event is scheduled for 1-5:30 p.m., Nov. 4, at Kamiak High School Performing Arts Center in Mukilteo.

“Based on the past two years, we suspect that reservations for seats at Kamiak may fill pretty quickly,” said Ken Harvey, communications director for Sno-Isle Libraries. “Live-stream video from Kamiak will also be shown nine community libraries and other venues and reservations for those sites will also open Oct. 15.”

New this year is an opportunity to reserve a space at the dress rehearsal starting at 4:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 3. Admission is free at all sites and both dates, but reservations are required and must be made online.

There are 11 speakers scheduled for the event, including:

  • Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger, former astronaut
  • Ron Carucci, leadership and change coach
  • Mark Perez, Cascadia College student
  • Richard Yonck, futurist and author
  • Zsofia Pasztor, executive director of Farmer Frog
  • Kathy Coffey, Executive Director of Leadership Snohomish County
  • Dhruvik Parikh, Jackson High School student
  • Nic O'Neill, Executive Director of the American Kitefliers Association
  • Tom Sebastian, President and CEO of Compass Health
  • Sargun Handa, Kamiak High School student
  • Bill Bernat, mental-health awareness advocate

“I believe the mix of subjects and viewpoints will make for an interesting afternoon,” Harvey said.

The live-stream viewing events sites include eight community libraries: Camano Island, Coupeville, Darrington, Edmonds, Lynnwood, Marysville, Mukilteo and Snohomish; and also at Gencare in Granite Falls.

For those who can’t attend one of the viewing sites, live-stream video will be available on the Sno-Isle Libraries website. This year, TEDxSnoIsleLibraries is working with Glisser.com to bring an interactive experience to anyone, anywhere with a computer or mobile device connected to the internet.

During the event, participants watching through Glisser will see the live-stream video from Kamiak and be able to post comments to others on Glisser and submit questions for speakers and event organizers for possible responses following the event.

Also new this year is an opportunity to interact with the speakers at Kamiak

“Previous attendees told us they wanted a chance to talk with the speakers,” Harvey said. “This year, there will be a separate post-event session at Kamiak where attendees will be able to ask questions of the speakers.”

Sno-Isle Libraries will also showcase a variety of services during the afternoon at Kamiak in what is dubbed the “IdeaLab.”

Through six informational stations with library staff, attendees will be able to get a library card, match their interests with a next book to read, learn more about business-related services, get technical with STEAM programming, see how kindergarten-readiness programs increase success and register to vote and other civic-engagement opportunities.

The Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation is a founding partner for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries. “TEDxSnoIsleLibraries makes the best ideas visible to our communities,” said Paul Pitkin, executive director of the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. “Our Foundation and other partners are delighted to invest in this effort so that audiences can attend free of charge.”

Other organizations backing the 2017 event include:

  • Community Transit
  • Whole Foods Market
  • Edmonds Community College
  • Everett Community College
  • Snohomish Health District
  • Washington State University North Puget Sound at Everett
  • The Daily Herald
  • KSER
  • Mukilteo Chamber of Commerce
  • OverDrive

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

About TED

TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. Started as a four-day conference in California 30 years ago, TED has grown to support its mission with multiple initiatives. The two annual TED Conferences invite the world's leading thinkers and doers to speak for 18 minutes or less. Many of these talks are then made available, free, at TED.com. TED speakers have included Bill Gates, Jane Goodall, Elizabeth Gilbert, Sir Richard Branson, Nandan Nilekani, Philippe Starck, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Sal Khan and Daniel Kahneman.

For more information

  • Ken Harvey, Communications Director, 360-651-7030, KHarvey@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
10/05/2017

Updated:
10/18/2017
TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2017 finalizes lineup of speakers

The final three announced speakers for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2017 are (clockwise from above): Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger, former astronaut; Ron Carucci, leadership and change coach; Mark Perez, Jackson High School student.

There will be plenty of ideas worth sharing at TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2017 

The final three speakers have been announced, filling out the lineup of presentations scheduled for the event scheduled for 1-5 p.m., Nov. 4, at Kamiak High School Performing Arts Center in Mukilteo.

The three speakers announced this week are:

  • Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger, former astronaut
  • Ron Carucci, leadership and change coach
  • Mark Perez, Jackson High School student

“I think people will find the mix of subjects and viewpoints shared by all the speakers to be worth their Saturday afternoon,” Sno-Isle Libraries Communications Director Ken Harvey said. “Three amazing high-school students, a former astronaut, high profile leaders from the community, a gardener, a kite flyer and more will be stepping onto the TEDx red circle to share some amazing stories.”

The full list includes:

  • Richard Yonck, futurist and author
  • Zsofia Pasztor, executive director of Farmer Frog
  • Kathy Coffey, executive director of Leadership Snohomish County
  • Dhruvik Parikh, Jackson High School student
  • Nic O'Neill, executive director of the American Kitefliers Association
  • Tom Sebastian, president and CEO of Compass Health
  • Sargun Handa, Kamiak High School student
  • Bill Bernat, mental-health awareness advocate

There will be three ways to view and participate in TEDxSnoIsleLibraries 2017.

“The speakers will be on stage for the audience at Kamiak High School,” Harvey said. “There will also be 10 community sites across Snohomish and Island counties where attendees can gather and view the livestream video of the speakers from Kamiak.”

The community sites include nine libraries; Camano Island, Coupeville, Darrington, Edmonds, Granite Falls, Lynnwood, Marysville, Mukilteo and Snohomish, and the GenCare living facility in Granite Falls.

Reservations for seats at Kamiak and the community viewing sites must be made online starting Oct. 15. When registration opens, a link will be available at sno-isle.org/tedx. Admission is free.

And the third way to view and participate is online.

This year, TEDxSnoIsleLlibraries is working with Glisser.com to bring an interactive experience to anyone, anywhere with a computer or mobile device connected to the internet. During the event, participants watching through Glisser will see the live-stream video from Kamiak and all the slides a presenter may be using. Participants may also use Glisser to post comments to others on the Glisser event and submit questions for speakers and event organizers for possible responses following the event.

Also new this year is an enhanced opportunity to interact with the speakers at Kamiak

“In the first two years of this event, attendees wanting to interact with the speakers was one of the most frequent requests,” said Harvey, who is also the event licensee. “This year, there will be a separate post-event session at Kamiak where attendees will be able to ask questions of the speakers.”

Sno-Isle Libraries will also showcase a variety of services during the afternoon at Kamiak in what is dubbed the “IdeaLab.”

Through six informational stations with library staff, attendees will be able to get a library card, match their interests with a next book to read, learn more about business-related services, get technical with STEM programming, see how kindergarten-readiness programs increase success and register to vote and other civic-engagement opportunities.

The Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation is a founding partner for TEDxSnoIsleLibraries. “TEDxSnoIsleLibraries makes the best ideas visible to our communities,” said Paul Pitkin, executive director of the Sno-Isle Libraries Foundation. “Our Foundation and other partners are delighted to invest in this effort so that audiences can attend free of charge.”

Other creative and inspiring organizations backing the 2017 event include:

  • Community Transit
  • Whole Foods Market
  • Edmonds Community College
  • Everett Community College
  • Snohomish Health District
  • Washington State University North Puget Sound at Everett
  • The Daily Herald
  • KSER
  • Mukilteo Chamber of Commerce
  • OverDrive

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TED Talks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized. (Subject to certain rules and regulations.)

About TED

TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. Started as a four-day conference in California 30 years ago, TED has grown to support its mission with multiple initiatives. The two annual TED Conferences invite the world's leading thinkers and doers to speak for 18 minutes or less. Many of these talks are then made available, free, at TED.com. TED speakers have included Bill Gates, Jane Goodall, Elizabeth Gilbert, Sir Richard Branson, Nandan Nilekani, Philippe Starck, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Sal Khan and Daniel Kahneman.

For more information

  • Ken Harvey, Communications Director, 360-651-7030, KHarvey@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org
10/04/2017

Updated:
10/18/2017
Survey looks at Sno-Isle Libraries funding and services

Sno-Isle Libraries is asking for advice as officials look ahead to budgets starting in 2019

An online survey, open through Oct. 15, is looking for comments from customers, stakeholders and the general public about library services and funding for those services.

About 98 percent of the district’s funding comes from a property-tax levy in Island and most of Snohomish counties. The survey asks respondents whether they like the idea of increasing the levy rate or cutting at least $2 million from the 2019 library-district budget. The library operations levy was most recently on a ballot in 2009.

The intention is to share survey data with the Board of Trustees at their Oct. 23 meeting. A decision about putting the levy on a future ballot could come as soon as the trustees’ Dec. 11 meeting.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

Jim Hills, Sno-Isle Libraries Public Information Manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

 

10/03/2017
Donor helps Prime Time program come to Oak Harbor Library

Learning how to read opens possibilities.

Learning why to read opens minds.

On Oct. 3, a group of Oak Harbor children and their families will begin learning more about both how and why to read. Prime Time Family Reading program is a collaboration between Oak Harbor Library, Humanities Washington, Oak Harbor Public Schools and the generosity of one local donor.

The program is a series of six weekly evening sessions at the Oak Harbor Library. Each session, a skilled storyteller reads a story. Then, with the help of a scholar, the group discusses the ethical and cultural themes in the book. “Children’s books aren’t always child’s play,” according to the Humanities Washington website. “They can inspire important philosophical discussions on topics such as fairness, greed, courage, and compassion.”

School district staff invited 25 students and their families to participate.

“We focused on second- and third-graders,” said Kari Chwirka, of Oak Harbor Elementary School. “The families were recommended by their teachers.”

Research has shown that reading ability at third grade is critical for success later in school and life, according to Jane Lopez-Santillana, a librarian at the Oak Harbor Library. Humanities Washington says the program can inspire active thought and conversation in families through reading, boost long-term academic achievement and build connections with libraries.

This is the first time the statewide program has come to Oak Harbor.

“The program is free to the families, but there are costs,” Lopez-Santillana said.

The program includes library staff, local educational professionals and a staff member from Humanities Washington. The project is funded by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the George and Sheila Moy Saul Family Fund of the Whidbey Community Foundation.

The George and Sheila Moy Saul Family Fund of the Whidbey Community Foundation contributed $29,350 to help fund the program.  The Saul family contribution is made in honor of Betty Saul, George Saul's deceased mother, a longtime Ithaca, New York High School assistant librarian from 1970-89.

 “My mother was very involved in early learning programs and would be extremely excited about the potential for this program to help youngsters read,” George Saul said. “In her eyes, being able to read constituted the keys to the magic kingdom. This program would certainly bring an enthusiastic smile to her face.”

Saul said he believes strongly that learning to read is a foundational building block in the life-long learning process. He urged others to join him in supporting the program.

“Our community has many retirees who want to make an impact on the community and help youth,” he said. “An appealing aspect of the Oak Harbor Prime Time Family Reading Program is that anyone can step forward and help.” 

10/03/2017

Updated:
10/18/2017
Lynnwood Library to host 'Techtoberfest' on Oct. 7

“TechtoberFest” returns to Lynnwood Library on Oct. 7.

“Access to computers and connectivity is one of our core services,” said Roxanna Garrison, assistant managing librarian at Lynnwood. “This event lets us showcase the technology available at the library plus we bring in experts and professionals to talk about where technology can take you.”

The Techtoberfest switch will be flipped at 1 p.m. with a panel of graphics-industry experts discussing art and artists in the digital age. They’ll talk about what they do, and the paths they took to get to where they are today. Panelist will include:

From 2-4 p.m., participants can experience virtual reality with the Oculus Rift, learn about The Facility Maker Space at Edmonds Community College, watch the WSU-Everett Engineering Club robotics team in action and explore exotic locations with the iMac photo booth green screen.

Other activities will include programming Ozobots, painting with an airbrush and using iMacs to explore Adobe Creative Suite software. There will also be a contest to earn a USB flash drive and a drawing to win a Kindle Fire. This is the third year for the tech-focused event.

Techtoberfest is supported by the Friends of the Lynwood Library.

About Sno-Isle Libraries

Sno-Isle Libraries serves 743,540 residents in Snohomish and Island counties through 22 community libraries, online services and Library on Wheels.

For more information

  • Roxanna Garrison, Lynnwood Library assistant managing librarian, 425-778-2148, rgarrison@sno-isle.org
  • Jim Hills, public information manager, 360-651-7050, jhills@sno-isle.org

Libraries are the concert halls of the finest voices gathered from all times and places.
- Jean Paul Richter