Consider technical education or apprenticeships

Traditional colleges and four-year universities are not the only way to pursue a satisfying career. Technical schools and apprenticeships offer educations in trades that get you the experience and training you need, often at much lower costs or while getting paid to be on the job.

If you are still in high school or never received your diploma, consider Sno-Isle Tech. This public high school provides preparatory training, certification, and post-secondary credit to students, who can then choose to continue their education, go straight to work, or both. This education opportunity is open to:

  • Juniors and Seniors in Snohomish and Island counties (Member district students have priority).
  • Anyone age 16 to 20 who has not received a high school diploma.
  • Anyone age 16 to 20 who has earned his/her GED.
  • Students who know what type of technical training they want.

YouthWorks Washington offers youth internships, mentorships and job opportunities for teens and young adults.

The WA State Department of Labor and Industries offers a useful guide on Becoming an Apprentice.

Year Up is a a one-year, intensive training program for under-served young adults, especially DACA students and immigrants. 

For free residential education and job training for young adults ages 16-24, explore Job Corps, where students have access to room and board while they learn skills in specific training areas for up to three years. In addition to helping students complete their education, obtain career technical skills and gain employment, Job Corps also provides transitional support services, such as help finding employment, housing, child care, and transportation. Job Corps graduates either enter the workforce or an apprenticeship, go on to higher education, or join the military.

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